Housing environment – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 11:33:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sadc-tribunal.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/favicon-1.png Housing environment – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ 32 32 The promise of hemp to heal a fragile world: Energy, food, housing, environment https://sadc-tribunal.org/the-promise-of-hemp-to-heal-a-fragile-world-energy-food-housing-environment/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 06:43:52 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/the-promise-of-hemp-to-heal-a-fragile-world-energy-food-housing-environment/ By Steve Allin If the COVID-19 pandemic was, as UN Secretary-General Antonio António Guterres said, “like an X-ray revealing fractures in the fragile skeleton of the societies we have built”, and if climate change is a major cause of these fractures, and then Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, it’s as if the painkillers were taken out […]]]>

By Steve Allin

If the COVID-19 pandemic was, as UN Secretary-General Antonio António Guterres said, “like an X-ray revealing fractures in the fragile skeleton of the societies we have built”, and if climate change is a major cause of these fractures, and then Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, it’s as if the painkillers were taken out of this discomfort.

All the issues of energy dependency, food security and the housing crisis were all present before but in a somewhat distant form, vaguely felt through the haze of rising fuel prices, overcrowded supermarkets and images of strangers on the sidewalks. As we now contemplate the grave problems looming before us, we urgently need to identify solutions as quickly as possible.

So how do we tackle these seemingly unrelated issues? I suggest that they are not at all unrelated and that the solutions could be found in a single plan based on industrial hemp.

Food safety

Addressing food security is of paramount importance. Despite the growing number of stories of farmers protesting unsustainable market prices, we all agree with the concept that food should be cheap and indefinitely supplied. We now realize that many of the foods we consider essential, such as bread and the foods we give to our other food sources, especially animals for meat products, come from Russia or other countries. ukraine!

With food and fuel supplies disrupted by the horrific invasion of Ukraine, the costs of this unsustainable system are impacting food production everywhere else.

Many people are familiar with hemp foods these days, but there are still many ways hemp can be used to transition to a low-meat diet and provide us with a highly nutritious meal.

The good harvests

To solve the problems of rising nitrate costs and the loss of fertility of much of the western farmland, we need crops that do not require large amounts of fertilizer and that could improve the quality land for future crops such as industrial hemp. Hemp could be grown with human waste, which we currently literally flush down the toilet.

Although this waste should be filtered for microplastics and toxic elements that may be present, treating animal and human waste with anaerobic digesters can provide not only completely safe fertilizer, but also energy in the form of much needed gas. .

Hemp also provides an ideal crop to begin the return to tillage agriculture currently being promoted by governments in response to the war in Ukraine, as it grows extremely quickly, smothers competing weeds, reduces the use of herbicides and improves the soil for future crops of especially winter wheat or barley or green cover plants sown immediately after the hemp harvest.

Healthy housing

The accommodation of our young populations as they try to start their studies or their career in our cities, or the desire of young families to have a first comfortable home does not seem possible at the present time because there seems to be a housing shortage in most cities. The fact that so much of the available space is also energy inefficient and expensive or unsanitary is a sad reflection of current building standards.



Materials extracted from the hemp plant can be used as a natural fiber alternative to mineral wool and plastic foam insulation products or as an aggregate in hempcrete. These materials have a combination of positive behaviors, damping heat changes inside and outside a building while regulating humidity. This is especially true of hempcrete, which can easily be formed to provide a seamless fireproof thermal cover to a structure that resists mold and does not off-gas toxic.

These breathable, heat-storing, and insulating materials are now being used to make healthy upgrades to existing structures or new buildings all over the world. Preformed in blocks, particleboard or panels, hemp-based materials are also incorporated into modular housing systems.

Investment needed

Addressing this range of problems with the cultivation of a single plant may seem ideal, but without the essential primary processing facility there is no market for the raw material. The process of dehulling and separating materials or crushing chaff to extract bast fibers and kernel particles, called hurds, into a marketable form is not possible until there are mills to do the job. This would require a site in the center of the most suitable tillage area in a region to serve a community of farmers growing hemp as part of a sustainable crop rotation system.

It is possible to have a factory where a bale of hemp goes in at one end and bricks or entire houses of modular panels come out the other end. The plant would require an investment of €3,000,000 to €30,000,000 depending on the number of additional products to be manufactured at the same site. This is nothing if we include in the financial statement the employment of 8 to 60 people with the additional labor created by the delivery and installation of the product.

Add to that both the calculated carbon sequestration and reduction for the materials, and the entire process would then be measured as “net zero” for emissions, just like most hemp homes built internationally. right now.

In times of ’emergency’, basic needs such as food and shelter become paramount. And if there are good new systems to meet these basic needs, we should do everything we can to invest in this vital crop to reap these opportunities.


Steve Allin is a consultant, teacher and author of “Building with Hemp” (2005, 2012) and “Hemp Buildings 50 International Case Studies” (2021). An advisor to HempToday, Allin is the director of the International Hemp Building Association.

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Traffic jam, housing, environment all worries https://sadc-tribunal.org/traffic-jam-housing-environment-all-worries/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 15:00:05 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/traffic-jam-housing-environment-all-worries/ Kenny Boddye, Occoquan District Supervisor [Photo: Uriah Kiser/PLN] The district supervisor who represents what could be the next home of Washington commanders has spoken of plans to bring an NFL stadium to Woodbridge. Prince William County Occoquan District Supervisor Kenny Boddye said the team’s option to purchase 200 acres of land on Interstate 95, and […]]]>

Kenny Boddye, Occoquan District Supervisor [Photo: Uriah Kiser/PLN]

The district supervisor who represents what could be the next home of Washington commanders has spoken of plans to bring an NFL stadium to Woodbridge.

Prince William County Occoquan District Supervisor Kenny Boddye said the team’s option to purchase 200 acres of land on Interstate 95, and Prince William Parkway and Interstate 95 sparked many concerns. Traffic congestion, affordable housing and the effect on the environment are concerns Boddye noted in a voter information bulletin.

“From what I’ve read, the commanders’ search for a new site is still at an exploratory stage. The landing would be one of several sites under consideration for a mixed-use development and year-round entertainment venue that the team believes could attract off-season visitors,” Boddye writes. “I have not spoken with team representatives and no rezoning request has been submitted to the county for consideration. Additionally, the General Assembly has yet to approve the creation of a football stadium authority – which state lawmakers have publicly identified as a necessary step for the team to locate anywhere. in Virginia.

So far, the team has not completed a land sale in Woodbridge, according to the Prince William Circuit Court.

A Washington Commanders Football Stadium and a mixed-use development in Virginia would have an economic impact of more than $24 billion and create more than 2,200 jobs when fully constructed, InsideNoVa.com reports. It would be built on what the county government calls Prince William Landing, land that the county government has identified as ripe for an urban downtown.

A rendering showing a proposed stadium and practice facility shows a new downtown complex, complete with retail stores and an amphitheater, being built on the Horner Road Commuter lot, the state’s largest.

The Associated Press reports the team purchased 200 acres of land in Woodbridge to house a new stadium, training facility, amphitheater, shops and restaurants. A concept map shows the Commander’s facility replacing the Horner Road suburban lot, the state’s largest, on Interstate 95 and Prince William Drive, and the Telegraph Road lot, just across the street. from the street.

The team’s current lease at FedEx Field in Landover, Md., since 1997, runs through 2027. Despite purchasing land in Woodbridge, the team is considering other sites in Loudoun County , in Washington, DC and Maryland.

Over the years, the team has indicated that it wants a new stadium smaller than FedEx Field (90,000 seats) and a complex with a dome to host a Super Bowl.

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Where do the 38th District Senate candidates stand on homelessness, housing and the environment – ​​NBC 7 San Diego https://sadc-tribunal.org/where-do-the-38th-district-senate-candidates-stand-on-homelessness-housing-and-the-environment-nbc-7-san-diego/ Fri, 06 May 2022 01:16:23 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/where-do-the-38th-district-senate-candidates-stand-on-homelessness-housing-and-the-environment-nbc-7-san-diego/ With about a month to go until the June 7 California primary, NBC7 takes a closer look at the major races to watch, including the 38 Seat of the state senate for the district, which has three candidates vying for office representing voters living near the San Clemente beaches to Mission Bay. Among the priority […]]]>

With about a month to go until the June 7 California primary, NBC7 takes a closer look at the major races to watch, including the 38 Seat of the state senate for the district, which has three candidates vying for office representing voters living near the San Clemente beaches to Mission Bay.

Among the priority issues are concerns about the environment, water supplies, California’s skyrocketing housing prices and widespread homelessness.

The hopefuls include a businessman, a former fire captain and the mayor of a North County town.

Environmental issues like climate change and its effects are easy to see on local beaches.

Republican candidate Matt Gunderson, a former businessman and Orange County resident, said the recent bluff collapse at Beacon’s Beach in Encinitas was self-explanatory.

“This is proof that we are not doing enough to maintain security and access to our beaches,” Gunderson said.

As for the drought, Gunderson referred to California’s excess funding.

“To them not allocating some of that to serious infrastructure improvements that would solve the problem of access to water, or to building reservoirs…that allow us to maintain water levels, is glaring. “, said Gunderson.

Democratic candidate Catherine Blakespear, who is currently mayor of Encinitas and president of SANDAG, told NBC7 that her city is already reducing emissions with new transportation infrastructure plans through 2050, such as creating bike lanes. Encinitas is currently transitioning to a 100% renewable energy system called Community Choice Energy (CCE).

“People can basically go for dirty energy, but the default is clean energy,” Blakespear said.

The mayor believes that a major gesture is necessary to have an impact on climate change.

“We’re not going to be able to protect bluffs and prevent that from happening,” Blakespear said. “What we need to do is collectively wean ourselves off oil and gas and take a more sustainable approach to living on this planet.”

Orange County resident and Democrat Joe Kerr, a former fire captain, said a priority should be reducing or controlling wildfires. He sits on a regional water quality monitoring board and said the drought conditions were further fueling wildfires. In addition, he believes, there is a need to improve reservoirs and stormwater capacity, which have not kept pace with the state’s population growth.

“As a complement to our firefighters,” Kerr said. “By providing them with the tools and resources they need. California State staffing will be at the top of the priority list.”

Another objective of the candidate: the lack of affordable housing in California.

Blakespear said there is a need to build more housing for all income levels because it creates a vital community. She has been a strong proponent of accessory living units or granny flats.

“We have the ability to sprinkle in density and add more housing, and also allow value to go to the landlord,” Blakespear said.

Kerr approaches the housing issue from a public safety perspective, saying density can create problems.

“It will negatively impact the water system which was pre-designed, the sewage system which was pre-designed, the electrical system, wi-fi and parking,” Kerr said.

Gunderson said adding density in single-family neighborhoods is disruptive.

“The government can’t promise you can afford to live wherever you want,” Gunderson said. “And we have to accept that some of these communities are built and they exist.”

A lack of affordable housing has contributed to a growing homeless population across the state.

Kerr suggested the state could hire NGOs and their own agencies to help with services such as rides to job fairs, temporary housing and California ID applications to help someone get back on your feet.

“Sometimes mental health and addiction go hand in hand, so increasing that support to manage addiction funding, mental health, and getting those people the services they need is really important,” Kerr said. .

Gunderson said just building shelters is not enough.

“We’re going to fight homelessness by really getting to the heart of the issues, which is mental health and addiction,” Gunderson said.

Blakespear said a mechanism — like a power of attorney, a judge, or someone stepping in — is needed.

“I support the idea of ​​CAL Court, which basically says that people are literally dying and killing themselves on our streets, and we need to be able to get them into treatment, even if it’s against their will,” said Blakespear.

The two candidates who receive the most votes in the primary elections, regardless of political affiliation, will advance to the November general election.

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Housing, Environment, and Bishop of Fall River https://sadc-tribunal.org/housing-environment-and-bishop-of-fall-river/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/housing-environment-and-bishop-of-fall-river/ Construction vs. environment difficult to reconcile Ms. Ludtke’s Your Turn column on January 15 touched on a topic very close to the hearts of many Cape Town communities. We all agree that there is a great need for affordable housing across Cape Town. At the same time, we are concerned to preserve the character of […]]]>

Construction vs. environment difficult to reconcile

Ms. Ludtke’s Your Turn column on January 15 touched on a topic very close to the hearts of many Cape Town communities. We all agree that there is a great need for affordable housing across Cape Town. At the same time, we are concerned to preserve the character of our cantons and to protect our fragile strip of sand from overconstruction.

How can we reconcile our need for housing with our desire to preserve the environment? Here in Wellfleet, the city owns nine acres of land, six of which are offered to an affordable housing developer. It’s a very commendable undertaking, and on paper it sounds like an ideal solution. However, it is a question of stripping six acres of woodland and replacing them with the development of 46 housing units, asphalt, public lighting and traffic.

Are we overloading our environment? Are we adding pollutants to the air, to the water, to the soil? In my opinion, it would be healthier to find or build smaller dwellings that won’t impact our open spaces, because once they’re gone, they’re gone forever. I completely agree with Mrs Ludtke that we have an obligation to avoid the destruction of our heritage.

Edina Kopits, Wellfleet

The Bishop of Fall River exceeded his authority

Bishop Edgar M. da Cunha of the Catholic Diocese of Fall River may have exceeded his authority by silencing Rev. Michael Fitzpatrick of St. Francis Xavier Parish in Hyannis for his criticism of COVID-19 vaccines, (the anti-priest -vaccine in Hyannis is censored by the Catholic Bishop of Fall River, January 13).

It is not up to any Catholic prelate to determine the “effectiveness” of a medical treatment. As for its moral legitimacy, although Pope Francis has urged Catholics to accept the vaccine, the same Vatican document that states that receiving the vaccine is morally licit, insists that vaccination must be voluntary.

This makes it clear that those with medical or ethical reservations about the vaccine — such as Catholics concerned about the use of fetal cell lines in vaccine production or testing — should not be coerced.

Nor does the Pope’s endorsement of the vaccine negate traditional Catholic teaching on the exercise of a properly formed conscience.

The Catholic Church expects faithful Catholics to uphold the sanctity of innocent human life in an often hostile public square. One would think that the hierarchy would be accommodating to the conscientious concerns of such Catholics.

Unfortunately, it is not the case. When it comes to the relationship between the Catholic people and the Catholic bishops, loyalty, it seems, is one-sided.

CJ Doyle, Executive Director, Catholic Action League of Massachusetts

COVID deaths explain the loss of many workers

In Sunday’s paper, there was a long article explaining all the reasons companies can’t find workers. Nowhere in the entire article was there any mention of the fact that over 800,000 Americans have died from COVID. I wonder why not. Are journalists warned not to report these numbers?

True, many of those dead were elderly and retired people, but surely several hundred thousand were workers who will never return to the workforce. And, until people take reasonable precautions to get vaccinated and wear masks, that number will continue to rise.

Robin Hubbard, Orleans

This article originally appeared on Cape Cod Times: construction of affordable housing at the expense of the environment of the cape

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‘Hostile Housing Environment’ Claim Survives Summary Judgment in HOA Lawsuit https://sadc-tribunal.org/hostile-housing-environment-claim-survives-summary-judgment-in-hoa-lawsuit/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 20:04:26 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/hostile-housing-environment-claim-survives-summary-judgment-in-hoa-lawsuit/ Federal court allows legal action alleging that an Indianapolis homeowners association and its property management company were aware of racial harassment in the Twin Creeks subdivision and did not take legal action to prevent the problematic neighbor using offensive language and making threats. The Fair Housing Center of Central Indiana and a former resident of […]]]>


Federal court allows legal action alleging that an Indianapolis homeowners association and its property management company were aware of racial harassment in the Twin Creeks subdivision and did not take legal action to prevent the problematic neighbor using offensive language and making threats.

The Fair Housing Center of Central Indiana and a former resident of the Twin Creeks subdivision filed a complaint in April 2020, claiming that the Twin Creeks Homeowners Association and Kirkpatrick Management Co., Inc. as well as neighbor Vicky New violated the Fair Housing Act. . They detail years of intimidation and verbal reprimands against neighbors, as well as the use of racist names and threats of bodily harm.

In January, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Indiana found that the plaintiffs had enough factual allegations to pursue their allegations of violations of the Federal Fair Housing Act, the Fair Housing Act of l ‘Indiana and Federal Civil Rights Act.

After the defendants were granted dismissal of some of the claims, they filed a motion for summary judgment on the remaining Fair Housing Act claims pursuant to 42 USC § 3601. and following. and the Civil Rights Act claim under 42 USC § 1982.

In a December 17 decision in Fair Housing Center of Central Indiana, Inc., and Donata Banks, v. Vicki New, Kirkpatrick Management Company, Inc. and Twin Creeks Homeowners Association, Inc., 1: 20-cv-01176, the Southern Indiana District Court issued summary judgment in part, but allowed one of the fair housing claims and the section 1982 claim.

The federal court issued summary judgment on 42 USC §§ 3604 (a) which prohibits denial of housing based on race, color, religion, sex, familiar statue or national origin and (c) which prohibited from making public notice that the home is available only to certain persons on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, disability, familiar status or national origin.

However, the court rejected the summary judgment on 42 USC § 3604 (b) which prohibits discrimination against any person in the sale or rental of a home on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, familiar status or national origin.

“The evidence referred to by the parties could allow a reasonable investigator to conclude that a hostile housing environment based on race and national origin existed at Twin Creeks,” wrote Chief Justice Tanya Walton Pratt. “For years, New openly and brazenly harassed and verbally assaulted his neighbors because of their race and national origin. The designated evidence could also allow a reasonable investigator to conclude that New’s conduct, intimidation and threats interfered with the banks’ enjoyment of their housing rights.

Specifically, the court noted that the plaintiffs indicated that the defendants were aware of News’s racial harassment as early as September 2016 and that the CCRs gave the defendants the power to take legal action against New.

The defendants replied that the letters they wrote to New were a reasonable response to his racial harassment and there is no evidence that they intentionally discriminated against neighbors complaining about New’s behavior.

By allowing the 3604 (b) request to continue, the court found that these factual disputes should be decided by an investigator.

Likewise, the court concluded that summary judgment was not warranted on the claim under section 1982.

“The rights of the banks to use and profit from its assets have been compromised, and there is evidence that supports an inference – which should be decided by the investigator – that the defendants had discriminatory intent because they brought suing News for non-payment of HOA dues but failed to initiate legal action against New for his racial harassment, ”Walton Pratt wrote.


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Governor DeSantis’ budget includes housing, environment https://sadc-tribunal.org/governor-desantis-budget-includes-housing-environment/ Thu, 09 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/governor-desantis-budget-includes-housing-environment/ The budget – a proposal to the Florida legislature for the 2022 session – includes a number of legislative priorities for Florida real estate agents, such as affordable housing assistance. TALLAHASSEE, Florida – Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has announced his State Budget for Freedom First 2022-23 recommendations Thursday, and his proposal includes a number of […]]]>

The budget – a proposal to the Florida legislature for the 2022 session – includes a number of legislative priorities for Florida real estate agents, such as affordable housing assistance.

TALLAHASSEE, Florida – Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has announced his State Budget for Freedom First 2022-23 recommendations Thursday, and his proposal includes a number of Florida Realtors® core legislative priorities, including affordable housing and environmental goals.

The governor’s budget outlines DeSantis’ priorities ahead of the 2022 session of the Florida legislature. It represents its spending priorities and recommendations as to the amount of money that it believes should be allocated to different areas of the state budget, such as education, health, transport, etc.

Lawmakers don’t have to accept DeSantis’ proposals, but its budget often serves as a roadmap for policies and funding amounts. The governor also has the power to veto final budget items, and this gives lawmakers insight into which issues the governor promotes and does not promote.

“It’s a huge, huge budget. It’s a huge deal, ”DeSantis said at a press conference. “This is something that is going to have very positive effects. We are doing it while remaining the lowest per capita tax burden in the country.”

Overall, DeSantis’ proposal is about $ 2 billion less than the current year’s budget, according to its office. Its budget would continue to use federal money to fund some key issues, such as a plan to eliminate the state’s gasoline taxes for five months from July. The federal government allocated this money to offset roughly $ 1 billion in lost gas tax revenue typically used for transportation projects but lost during pandemic lockdowns.

Affordable housing

Governor DeSantis’ budget provides $ 40 million to create a revolving loan program that supports home ownership of the workforce, including down payment and assistance with closing costs. Its proposed program is similar to the Hometown Hero Housing program that Florida Realtors are already working with lawmakers to create next year.

The governor recommends $ 355.5 million to fully fund the state and local government housing trust funds as follows:

  • $ 95 million for the State Apartment Incentive Loan (SAIL) program
  • $ 220.5 million for the State Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) program

Environment

DeSantis recommends more than $ 980 million for Everglades restoration and water resource protection. That amount would bring the DeSantis administration’s four-year investment to more than $ 3 billion, exceeding the governor’s target of $ 2.5 billion set more than four years ago.

$ 660 million for the restoration of the Everglades includes:

  • $ 86.5 million for restoration strategies
  • $ 372 million for the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP)
  • $ 69 million for the EAA reservoir
  • $ 50 million for specific project components designed to achieve the greatest reductions in harmful discharges in the Caloosahatchee and Saint Lucia estuaries
  • $ 83.3 million is included for the Everglades and Northern Estuaries Protection Program

$ 195 million for targeted water quality improvements includes:

  • $ 125 million for the wastewater subsidy program
  • $ 50 million to accelerate projects to meet science-based nutrient reduction targets
  • $ 20 million for critical infrastructure, including sewage and stormwater projects in Biscayne Bay

$ 50 million to restore Florida springs

$ 35 million to improve water quality and fight algal blooms, including blue-green algae and red tide:

  • $ 15 million for innovative technologies and short-term solutions to help prevent, clean up and mitigate harmful algal blooms
  • $ 10.8 million to increase water quality monitoring
  • $ 5 million to help county governments respond to biological debris emergencies associated with red tides
  • $ 4.2 million in funding for the continued support of research activities conducted by the Center for Red Tide Research and long-term collaborative partnerships between the FWC, the University of South Florida College of Marine Science and the Mote Marine Laboratory

$ 40 million for the Alternative Water Supply Grants Program to help communities plan and implement vital conservation, reuse and other alternative water supply projects

$ 100 million for the stabilization, treatment and closure of the Piney Point site

$ 100 million for the Florida Forever program

More than $ 550 million for the Resilient Florida program

© 2021 Florida Realtors®

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The Ensemble Montréal platform emphasizes safety, housing, the environment https://sadc-tribunal.org/the-ensemble-montreal-platform-emphasizes-safety-housing-the-environment/ https://sadc-tribunal.org/the-ensemble-montreal-platform-emphasizes-safety-housing-the-environment/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 20:26:15 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/the-ensemble-montreal-platform-emphasizes-safety-housing-the-environment/ Breadcrumb Links Local News “We are realistic, we have experience and we understand the issues,” said Denis Coderre, officially unveiling his party’s electoral program on Friday. Author of the article: Jason magder • Montreal Gazette Ensemble Montreal leader Denis Coderre says Montrealers want a change from the direction Valérie Plante has taken the city over […]]]>


“We are realistic, we have experience and we understand the issues,” said Denis Coderre, officially unveiling his party’s electoral program on Friday.

Content of the article

These were the three priorities described by the leader and mayoral candidate Denis Coderre on Friday morning when he officially unveiled his party’s electoral platform.

Coderre said Montrealers want a change from the direction in which Valérie Plante has taken the city over the past four years. He added that the city cannot afford four more years of Project Montreal leadership, saying the ruling party has left the city in dire financial straits.

“It’s a war cabinet. I want to make sure we all work together, because it’s for the good of Montreal, ”said Coderre, surrounded by candidates on a stage in picturesque Gouin Park, by the river, in Montreal-North. “Clearly, we will have a mayor who knows what leadership is. “

Content of the article

He accused Plante of bowing down to a certain group of Montrealers, adding that he plans to be the mayor of all Montrealers from all walks of life.

“We need an administration that can bring people together,” Coderre said. “We are realistic, we have experience and we understand the issues.

Coderre also lashed out at Balarama Holness, claiming that a vote for the leader of the Montreal Movement is essentially a vote for Plante.

“If you really want change, we are the alternative,” he said.

Nadine Gelly, Coderre’s choice for the executive committee chair, said her party’s pledges amount to $ 2.89 billion, which is more than three times lower than the promises made by Projet Montreal. She refuted the ruling party’s claim that it will only have $ 255.9 million in new spending over four years.

Content of the article

“It’s a joke,” Coderre agreed. “We have a wonderful team and they know how to count. “

Some of the highlights of the Ensemble Montréal platform, titled Vision 2045: Building the Metropolis for Future Generations, include:

Public security

  • Hire 250 more police officers to bring the total to 4,800, secure a seat for Montreal on the board of directors of the École nationale de police du Québec and give the chief of police the power of a deputy city director .
  • Double the number of mixed squads, where police work together with health and social service workers to help marginalized people living on the streets or suffering from mental illness.
  • Put in place more prevention tools by adding more sports facilities for young people, by increasing the number of patrol officers on foot and by bicycle and by adequately funding the Center for the prevention of radicalization leading to violence ( CPRLV).


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Gainey and Moreno debate housing, environment and more in lengthy Pittsburgh town hall debate https://sadc-tribunal.org/gainey-and-moreno-debate-housing-environment-and-more-in-lengthy-pittsburgh-town-hall-debate/ https://sadc-tribunal.org/gainey-and-moreno-debate-housing-environment-and-more-in-lengthy-pittsburgh-town-hall-debate/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 20:42:12 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/gainey-and-moreno-debate-housing-environment-and-more-in-lengthy-pittsburgh-town-hall-debate/ In an extensive debate that lasted nearly three hours, mayoral candidates Ed Gainey, a state representative, and Tony Moreno, a retired Pittsburgh police officer, discussed topics ranging from housing and from economics to the environment and voter identification. If elected, Gainey would become the city’s first black mayor. Moreno would become the first Republican candidate […]]]>


In an extensive debate that lasted nearly three hours, mayoral candidates Ed Gainey, a state representative, and Tony Moreno, a retired Pittsburgh police officer, discussed topics ranging from housing and from economics to the environment and voter identification.

If elected, Gainey would become the city’s first black mayor. Moreno would become the first Republican candidate elected for the post since the 1930s.

“I think Pittsburgh is ready for change,” Democratic candidate Gainey said in his opening remarks, adding that he wanted to make the city safer, cleaner and more affordable for everyone.

Moreno, a Republican candidate after losing the Democratic primary, described his opponent as part of the city’s existing problems rather than someone who could help solve them. Moreno said he was running because “my city is broken” after elected officials fail to represent the people and “the politics of the day are not working”.

Both agreed that the affordable housing shortage was one of the main issues to be addressed, although their views on how to deal with the housing crisis differ.

“Housing is currently very expensive,” Gainey said, adding that his administration would be “laser-focused” on creating more affordable housing.

“We’ve had explosive growth in this city that has gentrified neighborhoods, because we haven’t invested in affordability,” Gainey said.

He proposed to remedy the problem with inclusionary zoning, which would ensure that “all projects presented to us are affordable”.

Moreno accused Gainey of “intentionally going out and gentrifying” the city, citing a 2013 interview in which Gainey touted his involvement in an East Liberty project that is often cited as an example of gentrification in the city.

“He is campaigning and telling you to stop what he has already done,” Moreno said.

Instead, Moreno suggested finding people in the community, training them in the communities where they live and encouraging them to revitalize the homes and buildings already there. Then people who live in the community can move into affordable housing that has been revitalized there by local workers, he said.

The two were also divided over whether they would extend the moratorium on evictions, which was aimed at helping people stay at home throughout the covid-19 pandemic, when many were not able to work.

Moreno said he would eliminate the moratorium, instead focusing on helping people who have lost their jobs to find jobs so they can pay their bills. The moratorium, he said, hurt homeowners who relied on that income, as not all of them are “billionaire homeowners.”

Gainey, however, was in favor of maintaining the moratorium as part of the emphasis on ensuring that housing was available to everyone.

It also recommended using the land available through the city’s land bank for affordable housing, while designating part of this land for urban gardens and green spaces.

Moreno argued that, if affordable housing is the main problem, all of the land bank’s resources should be devoted to solving this problem.

Candidates also addressed the theme of the environment, a topic that was brought to the fore under the administration of Mayor Bill Peduto.

“The more we move towards green and clean jobs, the better our economy will be,” Gainey said.

He advocated for renewable energy sources, stressed the importance of clean water and air, and urged accelerating the process of removing lead water pipes, some of which have more 100 years old. Gainey also pledged not to privatize PWSA, saying other parts of the country have seen tariffs “rise dramatically” after the privatization of utility companies.

“We see climate action every day. Let’s make it personal. We see it in our homes, ”he said, using flooded basements as an example.

Regarding the environment, Moreno also highlighted the importance of clean water and air, with particular emphasis on using the city’s well-known rivers as a source of energy.

But he said people should focus on solving environmental issues within the city, rather than pointing fingers.

“Blaming the fracking in Beaver County for what’s going on here is the wrong thing to do,” he said, accusing traffic of being a major cause of pollution in the city.

Moreno said he would work to fill positions on the board of directors of PWSA and other city councils with people qualified to do the job, rather than politicizing the process by appointing political friends, which he has. suggested to current managers to do.

“We have professionals here who are expert at what they do in the city of Pittsburgh,” said Moreno, suggesting they shouldn’t continue to outsource to other cities to fill roles that could be. best run by residents who understand the community. “We’re not looking internally to find our best and brightest to develop Pittsburgh in every corner we can.”

Gainey said that completing such appointments is “a great opportunity to engage in the community” and solicit their recommendations.

Both said they believe everyone should have access to jobs to strengthen the local economy and get people back on their feet after the covid-19 pandemic.

They briefly discussed the police, an area in which the candidates have very different views.

“We have to change mentalities. We don’t need a military-style police force. Who are we at war with? We are not at war with our neighbors, ”Gainey said, calling for“ systematic changes ”and more social workers who could be called in to“ defuse situations ”.

But Moreno argued that “reimagining the police force,” as Gainey suggested, “is consistent with redefining funds or funding the police.”

He pointed out that Pittsburgh police officers receive mental health training and are equipped to handle all kinds of situations. The retired police officer blamed the city administration for any shortcomings in the police service, pointing out that the officers themselves believe in “justice and benevolence.”

They were also divided on the subject of voter identification, with Moreno supporting the measure as a way to protect the voting rights he fought for in the military. He suggested that the city government pay for IDs for everyone on their 18th birthday.

The idea that people of color and other minorities can be barred from voting because of voter identification laws is “just ridiculous” and “insulting,” he said.

Gainey, however, has spoken out against voter identification and said he is arguing instead for strengthening voter participation.

Moreno also opposed recent measures by the city council to strengthen his own power, calling them a “takeover”. He said he did not know which candidate council was “afraid of more”, but said he did not believe their efforts to strengthen their own authority would be successful.

Julia Felton is an editor for Tribune-Review. You can contact Julia at 724-226-7724, jfelton@triblive.com or via Twitter .



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Housing environment influenced mental health during COVID-19 pandemic https://sadc-tribunal.org/housing-environment-influenced-mental-health-during-covid-19-pandemic/ https://sadc-tribunal.org/housing-environment-influenced-mental-health-during-covid-19-pandemic/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 00:32:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/housing-environment-influenced-mental-health-during-covid-19-pandemic/ The last year and a half has been a struggle for all of us, and that’s to be put lightly. But in terms of mental health, Americans living in apartments, especially those who live alone, may have suffered more mental health issues during the COVID-19 pandemic than those who live with their families in the […]]]>


The last year and a half has been a struggle for all of us, and that’s to be put lightly.

But in terms of mental health, Americans living in apartments, especially those who live alone, may have suffered more mental health issues during the COVID-19 pandemic than those who live with their families in the suburbs, suggest. new research from the University of Georgia. .

Posted in the International Journal of Environmental and Public Health Research, the study found that people living in multi-family dwellings, such as apartment complexes, were more likely to have mental health problems than people living in single-family homes or condos. Renters were also more likely to suffer from mental health issues during the pandemic than these landlords.

I firmly believe that your housing environment can impact your mental health, especially during COVID. “

Andy Carswell, Professor, College of Family and Consumer Sciences

Research has shown that tenants, especially those living in high-density complexes, are more prone to mental health crises in general, but the pandemic appears to be making that effect worse.

“In most tenant environments, the resident doesn’t have as much control as they would like,” Carswell said. Loud neighbors, outdoor space, even though the resident may own pets, it all depends on the rental company rules. “When you are out of control it can damage your mental health, cause anxiety, and make you a little more depressed.”

As social opportunities dried up, people living alone found it more difficult to cope mentally than those who lived with family members.

“One side of the coin is this feeling of relief: ‘I live alone. “I am much less likely to contract the virus if I live alone,” Carswell said. “But there is also an epidemic of loneliness. Our data shows that your mental health improves as more and more people come into the picture: the more people there are in the home, the better the mental health of the people. people.”

High-density apartment complexes have caused stress

The researchers drew on data from the Household Pulse Survey, a randomized online survey from the Census Bureau that collected information on how people’s lives have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic. On average, over 80,000 households per week participated, with over 1.5 million total participants during the study period.

The survey included a variety of questions, including employment status, food security, and job security. Participants were also asked how often they have felt depressed, anxious or worried during the past week.

For tenants, a variety of factors likely came into play. Narrower living quarters in high-density buildings means an increased likelihood of meeting someone in the hallway and possibly being exposed to the virus. Series of closures meant more people were staying at home 24/7, potentially increasing the likelihood of interacting with others in the building.

Using traditional equipment like apartment gymnasiums or swimming pools has become a calculated risk, if they were not shut down by management to curb the spread.

Renters also generally have moderate to low incomes, and the pandemic has likely exacerbated already existing financial anxieties. The possibility of eviction was a pervasive threat until the adoption of moratoria.

Certification in mental wellness

Regardless of a participant’s housing situation, mental health issues were pervasive in all living units.

A mental wellness certification program for rental properties exists. Based on academic research studies, the Fitwel certification system was originally created by the CDC to improve health and well-being in buildings and communities. But extensive protocols to protect the mental health of residents are still quite rare.

“The big takeaway is that, unsurprisingly, housing matters,” Carswell said. “By defining one of the issues of the many layers of issues that COVID brings, mental health has really been a hidden aspect of this whole pandemic.”

Source:

Journal reference:

Ghimire, J., et al. (2021) The Impact of American Housing Type and Residential Living Situations on Mental Health During COVID-19. International Journal of Environmental and Public Health Research. doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168281.


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Housing and environment top priorities for NDP Leader Singh when campaign ends in Manitoba – Winnipeg https://sadc-tribunal.org/housing-and-environment-top-priorities-for-ndp-leader-singh-when-campaign-ends-in-manitoba-winnipeg/ https://sadc-tribunal.org/housing-and-environment-top-priorities-for-ndp-leader-singh-when-campaign-ends-in-manitoba-winnipeg/#respond Thu, 26 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/housing-and-environment-top-priorities-for-ndp-leader-singh-when-campaign-ends-in-manitoba-winnipeg/ Jagmeet Singh was the third federal leader to campaign in Winnipeg this week, after stopping in the city on Thursday to speak in the riding of Winnipeg North and meet with Indigenous leaders at The Forks. Singh’s campaign stoppage, who is running for NDP premier, follows appearances in Manitoba’s capital on August 20 by Liberal […]]]>


Jagmeet Singh was the third federal leader to campaign in Winnipeg this week, after stopping in the city on Thursday to speak in the riding of Winnipeg North and meet with Indigenous leaders at The Forks.

Singh’s campaign stoppage, who is running for NDP premier, follows appearances in Manitoba’s capital on August 20 by Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau and Conservative Party Erin O ‘Toole.

Singh highlighted the NDP’s plans for an urban housing strategy for Indigenous peoples and told 680 CJOB that the federal government must step in to help all Canadians secure housing.

Read more:

ANALYSIS: Jagmeet Singh wouldn’t support Scheer but he could support O’Toole

“We want to make sure that no one has to worry about finding a home that fits their budget,” he said.

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“We know that the housing crisis affects everyone, from all walks of life… we know that people struggle with homelessness, that people have little or no income – everyone struggles with housing. .

“This is a serious problem and we are committed to finding a solution.

Singh said the federal government “has really stopped participating in housing” since the 1990s, which has resulted in the closure of a number of large co-op and not-for-profit housing projects due to lack of federal investment. , which he says he’d have to turn around with an NDP government.

Another priority, he said, is to look at the ongoing “revolution” around clean energy and make better investments to prepare the country for success for the future, which could include inter-provincial grids. .

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Read more:

Singh highlights housing commitments alongside Indigenous applicants in Winnipeg

“This is another place where the federal government can step in and provide the link between Manitoba and other provinces that do not have the same access,” Singh said.

“Instead of buying electricity, which Ontario often does in the United States, (Ontario) should get clean energy from Manitoba. So this can be an economic opportunity for Manitoba, and above all an opportunity to reduce our emissions.

When it comes to funding such ambitious projects, the NDP leader said his counterparts have traditionally focused on reducing aid from other sectors or putting the burden on Canadians.

His solution: a third aggressive option that forces the biggest polluters and the richest in Canada to pay their fair share.

“I think there are some big changes we can make. I think that’s a really good place to start: why don’t we make sure the biggest polluters pay their fair share? It seems like if you’re really powerful and really rich, and you’re a big business… you kind of get a free ride, whether it’s on pollution or paying your fair share.

“This change, I think, is the really seismic change that’s going to make a big difference.”

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Click to play video: Climate change is likely voting problem for Manitobans this federal election: pollster”” src=”https://i0.wp.com/media.globalnews.ca/videostatic/news/5fpue7q4w0-po0wmf5j0b/CLIMATE_CHANGE_ELECTION_VAF0OER5_thumbnail_1280x720.jpg?w=1040&quality=70&strip=all” loading=”lazy” srcset=”” sizes=”” data-sizes=”(min-width: 1040px) 1040px,(min-width: 720px) 720px,450px”/>







Climate change is likely voting problem for Manitobans this federal election: pollster


Climate change a likely voting problem for Manitobans this federal election: pollster – August 18, 2021

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