Neighborhood – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 21:22:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://sadc-tribunal.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/favicon-1.png Neighborhood – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ 32 32 UWS townhouse asking for $ 30 million is said to be the most expensive in the neighborhood https://sadc-tribunal.org/uws-townhouse-asking-for-30-million-is-said-to-be-the-most-expensive-in-the-neighborhood/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 21:22:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/uws-townhouse-asking-for-30-million-is-said-to-be-the-most-expensive-in-the-neighborhood/ From left to right: Ileana Lopez-Balboa from Corcoran and Charlie Attias from Compass in front of 248 Central Park West (Corcoran, Compass, StreetEasy) The buyer of a historic Upper West Side home may soon own the most expensive townhouse in the neighborhood. A townhouse at 248 Central Park West asking for $ 30 million was […]]]>

From left to right: Ileana Lopez-Balboa from Corcoran and Charlie Attias from Compass in front of 248 Central Park West (Corcoran, Compass, StreetEasy)

The buyer of a historic Upper West Side home may soon own the most expensive townhouse in the neighborhood.

A townhouse at 248 Central Park West asking for $ 30 million was closed this week, by Compass. If the sale goes through, that would make the property the most expensive townhouse sold on the Upper West Side, according to valuation firm Miller Samuel.

The last time the home attempted to sell for that price was in 2018, when Michael Sieger, a brokerage firm with Sotheby’s International Realty, attempted to market the home for $ 29 million, The New York Times reported. The home was taken down and put back on the market, ultimately selling for $ 16.25 million in 2019, according to property records.

Two years and an ongoing pandemic later, the housing market has changed – and so has the house. The newly renovated home was listed by Corcoran in mid-September for $ 30 million. Less than three months later, a buyer was ready to sign the fine print.

Charlie Attias of Compass, who represented the anonymous buyer, said the sale was proof that the Upper West Side “is a pretty healthy market.” He postulated that the deal would set a neighborhood benchmark that would boost more broken records in the future.

Covering nearly 10,000 square feet, the six-story home has six bedrooms, though the layout can be reconfigured to accommodate up to eight. It has seven full baths and two half baths, as well as a 1,875 square foot wellness center with a heated swimming pool, jacuzzi, sauna and hydrotherapy steam shower and massage.

The house has undergone extensive renovations over the past two years, using environmentally friendly and non-toxic materials. Other features include a virtual doorman, a new security system and a dehumidification system.

The house is one of the last three single-family homes on the avenue and was built by developer William Noble in 1887. Throughout its 134-year history were the parents of Generals Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant , who visited the wealthy colonel who owned the house in the years following the Civil War.

Ileana Lopez-Balboa of Corcoran represented the vendor. Corcoran declined to comment for this story.


Source link

]]>
Central 9th ​​is gaining popularity https://sadc-tribunal.org/central-9th-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bis-gaining-popularity/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 13:39:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/central-9th-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bis-gaining-popularity/ The Central 9th ​​district began as a carving of a much larger district, a hamlet whose urban zoning and access to public transport gave it a distinct impression within its boundaries. The area closest to the center of the neighborhood has long attracted the attention of developers who have started or are in the process […]]]>

The Central 9th ​​district began as a carving of a much larger district, a hamlet whose urban zoning and access to public transport gave it a distinct impression within its boundaries.

The area closest to the center of the neighborhood has long attracted the attention of developers who have started or are in the process of filling the neighborhood’s “main street” with a wide range of uses such as a center for digital media arts for. young people, architectural firms, restaurants, bars and a new cider house.

A list of proposed new housing projects shows the growing popularity of the area with developers as well as residents.

With so many changes in the built environment, including major transportation projects, zoning requests, announcements promoting proximity to the area, and a construction boom, we thought this was the right one. moment to shed light on what might change Central 9th ​​in the years to come.

What began as the Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency’s “West Temple Gateway” created the unique identity of the Central 9th ​​district. Urban zoning, city incentives and access to public transit have helped the neighborhood forge its own identity and, recently, flourish. Image courtesy of SLC RDA.

What, where and why is Central 9th?

Central 9th ​​is a district of Ballpark (formerly known as Peoples’ Freeway). It can be described as a sort of urban village, with an epicenter at 200 West 900 South and boundaries stretching from 600 South to about 1000 South, Main Street at 300 West.

The neighborhood is distinct in part because of the zoning which allows for a de jure pedestrian density, with two types of zoning in the core allowing either high infill density or medium infill density.

Washington and Jefferson Streets are home to older, often Victorian single-family or duplex residences, and are zoned Form-Based Urban Neighborhood 1 (FBUN1), allowing infill on these lots. Developers and owners have already started adding quads and more to these streets.

The streets bordering the heart of the neighborhood are FBUN2, which allows for a mix of uses in four- or five-story buildings that require no minimum front setbacks.

The neighborhood benefits from the east-to-west bus line on the 900 South with 15-minute trips and a tram offering 15-minute trips through the valley from multiple lines. The city is building a multi-use path that will link the eastern and western districts by bicycle.

Central 9th ​​is bounded by an oversized exit ramp that creates an unmistakable physical barrier separating the heart of the neighborhood from its southernmost boundary. It also ensures that acres of valuable land remain undeveloped.

In terms of developable land, the builders are in the process of filling what we’ll call Central 9th ​​Main Street.

The heart of the Central 9th ​​district, framed by new buildings made possible by the FBUN2 zoning. City crews are working to create a multipurpose path on the right, power lines will be put underground and new buildings already under construction will continue to frame the street near 200 W. 900 S. Photo by Taylor Anderson.

Wirehang out on central 9th ​​’Main Street’

For years, an abandoned natural gas filling station was located at the east end of Main Street in Central 9th. Plans came and went – a building permit was even withdrawn – but nothing materialized. We now have a glimpse of what could block the village center in 2022.

The developers had planned a mixed-use townhouse development on the site, at 110 W. 900 S. Instead, the property is being acquired by CW Urban. The group, a sponsor of Building Salt Lake, specializes in quick-build townhouse developments, but has recently ventured into urban design with projects in Downtown and elsewhere in Central 9th.

CW has also just closed on the old Henrie’s Cleaners at 906 S. 200 W., the site of one of two projects that will fill the middle of the neighborhood. It is one of two mixed-use buildings, known as Sydney and Slate, that will have the largest footprint in the neighborhood.

Sydney and Slate will flank and activate a lane between 200 West and Washington Street. They promise to expand the retail and restaurant space that is already strong in the village. The new homes above will continue to add energy and life to the streets below.

The female-led Maven District expanded its portfolio to 945 S. 300 W., framing the western boundary of Central 9th. It also offers space for new residents as well as offices and restaurants.

Builders are working on a 9 unit apartment building at 120 W. 900 S., and construction continues on several new builds in Washington south of 900 South.

All of this gives rise to a wave of construction in the region in tandem with a major street reconstruction project that will ground power lines and connect the east and west sides of the capital via a multi-use trail called the 9-Line.

The activity will visually fill and frame the central 9th ​​’Main Street’ and the new popularity has helped to attract attention on the outskirts of the neighborhood.

Goltz Avenue and Jefferson Street, outside the limits of Central 9th. Apartments C9, rezoned in RMU to accommodate the six-story apartment building on the right. A mix of single-family, duplex and quadruple on the left. One developer hopes to rezon several properties in the area from RMF-35 to FBUN2, which would allow more flexibility and effectively extend the 9th centre’s footprint to the south. Photo by Taylor Anderson.

South direction? Goltz / Jefferson Avenue rezoning

Before the end of the year, TAG SLC, another Building Salt Lake sponsor, applied for a rezoning of four properties near Jefferson Park, just south of Central 9th.

Requirement ? Extend the footprint of the urban neighborhood based on Forms 2 to the south.

The developer did not submit specific plans for duplex and single-family homes that would ultimately likely be demolished and replaced with a number of permitted infill developments in FBUN2 areas (likely townhouses or apartments).

Instead, he highlighted the proximity between TRAX stations at both 1300 South and 900 South, as well as the 900 South bus line and the growing possibility of walking in the area.

The area is considered to be very passable on foot and by bike, with good access to public transportation, according to the WalkScore website.

“The proposed rezoning will allow for the creation of a significant number of units without impacting the neighborhood more than these already existing projects,” wrote TAG SLC, highlighting the adjacent six-story C9 lofts that have been built in recent years.

Much of the neighborhood south of the exit ramp is zoned RMF-35, allowing developers who own enough properties to meet zoning requirements to demolish existing homes and build multi-family apartments.

But the region is struggling with perceived crime issues, and developers are touting the increase in eyes and feet on the streets as potential benefits in stamping out criminal activity. TAG SLC was no different.

“The additional surveillance offered by the possible projects under the rezones will have a positive impact on the neighborhood by improving the neighboring park and creating the density necessary to more adequately support public transport and commercial amenities in the region. “

If the planning commission and city council approve the zoning request, TAG SLC could build anything, whether it be cottage developments, townhouses, multi-family residences, mixed-use or storefronts, depending on the specifics of each plot.

An industrial warehouse on over an acre of land at 46 W. Fayette Ave., near the east end of Central 9th, is for sale. It is marketed to developers who might be interested in taking advantage of the adjacent downtown zoning that would allow a building up to 120 feet. Photo by Taylor Anderson.

A tower in Central 9th?

Mark this as long haul, but this property on the east end of the neighborhood is being marketed to developers who might want to take advantage of the adjacent downtown zoning and add height just steps from Central 9th.

The existing property spans over an acre of land in the southernmost part of the D-2 zoning, allowing the building to have zero setbacks and to extend in height.

“The desirable D-2 zoning allows for a building height of 65 ‘on the right and up to 120’ with a design review – a rarity in Granary,” the listing notes, referring to the neighboring district of Granary.

Much of the Granary District remains zoned for auto-oriented General Commerce (CG), which has large minimum lot sizes, high parking requirements, and yard setbacks, and is capped at no more than 90 feet after l design review.

Central 9th, on the other hand, is a mix of city zoning with setbacks and minimal parking requirements. A one-acre property that was no longer used as an industrial warehouse with a surface parking front yard being redeveloped would begin to expand the neighborhood to the east.

The property could also simply be adapted for a new use or remain the same.

Regardless, it’s hard to deny that as long as the I-15 off-ramp remains, it can be difficult to connect developments on the east side of the neighborhood with those in the center.

Want to know where developers are offering and building new apartments in Salt Lake, or just want to support a local source of information about what’s going on in your neighborhood? Subscribe to Salt Lake City Construction.


Source link

]]>
Governor Hochul announces increased efforts to end neighborhood scourge and increase homeownership in New York https://sadc-tribunal.org/governor-hochul-announces-increased-efforts-to-end-neighborhood-scourge-and-increase-homeownership-in-new-york/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 17:55:19 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/governor-hochul-announces-increased-efforts-to-end-neighborhood-scourge-and-increase-homeownership-in-new-york/ Governor Kathy Hochul today announced the expansion of the state’s Legacy Cities initiative, a targeted strategy to help local community revitalization efforts and increase homeownership opportunities in concentrated neighborhoods of New York. Launched earlier this year, the program will increase eligibility to now include all municipalities that meet specific criteria regarding locally coordinated investment efforts […]]]>

Governor Kathy Hochul today announced the expansion of the state’s Legacy Cities initiative, a targeted strategy to help local community revitalization efforts and increase homeownership opportunities in concentrated neighborhoods of New York. Launched earlier this year, the program will increase eligibility to now include all municipalities that meet specific criteria regarding locally coordinated investment efforts in well-defined neighborhoods or areas within the community. Additionally, the governor revealed that $ 4.8 million in funding had been provided under the program for projects in Albany, Newburgh and Syracuse.

“By expanding the Legacy Cities program, we are strengthening New York’s commitment to revitalizing disaster areas and bringing new homeownership equity opportunities to urban neighborhoods statewide. Governor Hochul said. “Families need safe, secure and affordable places to live, and I will continue to put the power of my administration behind programs that make this a reality while improving the quality of life in underserved neighborhoods across the state. . ”

Legacy Cities is a partnership between New York State Homes and Community Renewal and The Community Preservation Corporation (CPC), a non-profit community development finance institution that focuses on the preservation and creation of affordable and workforce housing. works in New York.

The program, initially open only to upstate communities served by a New York State land bank, will now begin accepting applications from any municipality in the state seeking funding for revitalization efforts. targeting specific neighborhoods in the community. The goal is to help transform dilapidated and vacant structures into newly remodeled, move-in-ready homes, which will help expand affordable homeownership opportunities for low- and moderate-income residents, especially early adopters. buyers and households of color.

CPC provides construction funding and technical assistance to developers for all Legacy City projects through its ACCESS program, an initiative that provides financial resources and capacity building support to real estate entrepreneurs of color who have historically faced barriers to entry into the development industry.

During the first phase of the program, three projects received a total UNHCR grant of just under $ 4.8 million, and another construction funding of $ 2.8 million from CPC.

  • In Albany, the state has awarded $ 1.9 million for a project in the city’s West Hill neighborhood that will renovate nine existing buildings consisting of 20 units.
  • In Newburgh, the state will provide $ 2.1 million for renovations to six buildings totaling 16 units in the Lander Street neighborhood.
  • In Syracuse, $ 717,000 will go towards renovating five buildings that house a total of seven units in the city’s southern neighborhood.

UNHCR Commissioner Ruth Anne Visnauskas said, “The Legacy Cities initiative is a strategic investment in building community wealth in our neighborhoods in the upstate. The three awards for Syracuse, Newburgh and Albany will breathe new life into these city centers, improve safety and expand access to affordable homeownership, especially for buyers of color who have traditionally been under-represented in the home market. lodging. We look forward to replicating this fundraising model in more communities across the state to build a stronger, more equitable New York City. “

CPC President and CEO Rafael E. Cestero said: “CPC is focused on investing in programs that close the racial wealth gap and increase equity and diversity within the development industry. Legacy Cities helps level the playing field by prioritizing affordable property opportunities for first-time buyers of color and gives M / WBE developers the opportunity to grow their businesses while revitalizing the communities in which they live and work. I thank Governor Hochul, UNHCR Commissioner Visnauskas and our land bank partners for their commitment to creating diverse and vibrant communities.

Under the terms of the program, the selected municipalities and land banks will transfer sets of 10 houses of one to three families to local developers, with preference going to developers who are minority and women owned businesses. CPC will provide construction funding and each project will be eligible to receive up to $ 75,000 per unit in HCR grant, with a potential of $ 95,000 per unit if specific energy efficiency improvements are included within the scope of the project. project. Once completed, each property will be sold back to first-time home buyers, with priority given to households of color and families earning less than 80% of the region’s median income.

Applicants will need to coordinate with community housing counseling agencies to help with the home buying process for each property and to provide home ownership education and training. UNHCR, through the New York State Mortgage Agency (SONYMA), will also provide access to the “Give Us Credit” program – a statewide initiative that uses alternative credit analysis. to increase homeownership for applicants who have been underserved in the homeownership market, particularly applicants of color. HCR will offer down payment assistance to potential buyers to cover acquisition and closing costs.

Program applications will be accepted as they arise and the application window will remain open until program funds have been committed. For more information on the Legacy Cities initiative, including nominations and termsheets, visit the UNHCR website: https://hcr.ny.gov/legacy-city-access-program.


Source link

]]>
Matt Talbot Provides Meals and Ongoing Support While On Vacation | Extra Quarter https://sadc-tribunal.org/matt-talbot-provides-meals-and-ongoing-support-while-on-vacation-extra-quarter/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/matt-talbot-provides-meals-and-ongoing-support-while-on-vacation-extra-quarter/ The annual holiday celebration took place over lunch on December 16 with a traditional Mexican feast hosted by Mexican restaurant La Paz and served by Matt Talbot’s board members. The board members serving lunch at the annual Fiesta are (front, from left) Ameeta Martin, Kiley Wiechman, Alynn Sampson and (back, from left) Brad Crain, Reina […]]]>





The annual holiday celebration took place over lunch on December 16 with a traditional Mexican feast hosted by Mexican restaurant La Paz and served by Matt Talbot’s board members. The board members serving lunch at the annual Fiesta are (front, from left) Ameeta Martin, Kiley Wiechman, Alynn Sampson and (back, from left) Brad Crain, Reina Day and Eric Crawford.


COURTESY PHOTO


SUBMITTED BY SUSIE WILSON, Matt Talbot Kitchen & Outreach, for Neighborhood Extra

Matt Talbot Kitchen & Outreach maintains his regular meal schedule during the holidays, including volunteers serving special, fully prepared meals for lunch (11:30 am to 12:30 pm) and dinner (5:30 pm to 6:30 pm) today – Christmas Day.

Customers can choose to dine on site or have their meal “to go”. Everyone is welcome.

The annual holiday celebration took place over lunch on December 16 with a traditional Mexican feast hosted by Mexican restaurant La Paz and served by Matt Talbot’s board members.

Community members worked with outreach staff to provide vacation assistance to individuals and families in Matt Talbot’s housing programs, which use evidence-based and compassionate service delivery models that include case management and assistance in finding quality affordable housing. Customers received assistance with basic needs, transportation, furniture, clothing and Christmas gifts for their children.

“Everyone deserves a special celebration during this season of giving and hope,” said Susanne Blue, Executive Director. “This year, more than ever, it has been wonderful to see the positive response from the community and the gratitude of those who are helped.”

Gift card donations of any amount to local grocery stores, restaurants, gas stations, Walmart or Target are always required to accommodate customers. Cards can be mailed to Matt Talbot or dropped off between 8:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Contact Lori Wellman, Director of Development, at 402-817-0621 with any questions or for more information.


Source link

]]>
Country Club Manor District Concerned About 3-Storey Apartment Building Project | News https://sadc-tribunal.org/country-club-manor-district-concerned-about-3-storey-apartment-building-project-news/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 00:19:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/country-club-manor-district-concerned-about-3-storey-apartment-building-project-news/ ROCHESTER, Minn. – Residents of the Country Club Manor neighborhood object to the size of a 3-story apartment building that should be built – saying it will not be suitable for the neighborhood. Titan Development plans to develop a 3 story building on 2.3 acres of land located at 36th and Country Club Rd. In […]]]>

ROCHESTER, Minn. – Residents of the Country Club Manor neighborhood object to the size of a 3-story apartment building that should be built – saying it will not be suitable for the neighborhood.

Titan Development plans to develop a 3 story building on 2.3 acres of land located at 36th and Country Club Rd. In an effort for more affordable housing.

The proposed 72-unit apartment would be raised to prevent flooding, along with driveways and parking spaces directly behind the owners’ one-story homes.

Owners Steve and Terry Fields live directly behind the grounds, they tell KIMT News 3 their biggest concerns are getting no sun and no privacy. They also say it would bring more traffic.

Other neighbors KIMT spoke to say they are not against affordable housing, the problem is the size and proximity of small single family homes.

Affordable housing – all of us neighbors are for that, we think the city of Rochester needs it – but they could have chosen a much better place to put it, rather than sticking this huge building on a piece of land. 2.3 acres, ”says Steve Champs.

Terry Fields adds, “We think it’s done because the city wants affordable housing, but let’s face it, you can’t cram a three story building on a tiny lot just to get your affordable housing.

The neighbors want the developers to reconsider a building in the R-2 zone that would allow duplexes.

David, who has lived in this neighborhood for 30 years, says, “It could have been handled differently, life will change dramatically and no matter what we say or do, it will basically happen. ”

He says he’s been reassured by the developer and council members that runoff won’t be a problem – but he thinks it will flood his garden.

David says ambient lighting is also a problem – comparing it to Friday night football in their backyard.

Another concern for the neighbors is that property values ​​will drop dramatically.

Karen and Dennis Noltee have been residents for 36 years.

“What if a three story project were to be built within ten feet of their property line – how would they vote? And I’m afraid that’s not what they’ll have in mind when they vote, ”says Karen.

“I just don’t think we should all pay the price for destroying our neighborhood and having a huge building built in our backyards,” she adds.

Neighbors plan to make their voices heard at the next hearing on the project before a decision is made at the January 3 city council meeting.


Source link

]]>
Westminster Farm to become home to 2,350 Uplands homes https://sadc-tribunal.org/westminster-farm-to-become-home-to-2350-uplands-homes/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 23:57:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/westminster-farm-to-become-home-to-2350-uplands-homes/ This story first appeared in a Colorado Community Media newspaper. The Colorado Sun owns CCM. By Luc Zarzecki, The Westminster Window After three long nights of debate and testimony, Westminster City Council voted 5-2 to approve the controversial plan to convert a large swath of farmland into a 2,350 Uplands housing development. Councilors voted at […]]]>

This story first appeared in a Colorado Community Media newspaper. The Colorado Sun owns CCM.

By Luc Zarzecki, The Westminster Window

After three long nights of debate and testimony, Westminster City Council voted 5-2 to approve the controversial plan to convert a large swath of farmland into a 2,350 Uplands housing development.

Councilors voted at the end of their meeting on Monday, which went on until nearly 1 a.m. Tuesday and was greeted with boos from some residents and members of Save the Farm, the group opposed to development.

The advisers, however, imposed conditions on the approval. These included: requiring the developer to pay 100% of the cost of all water, sanitary, storm sewer and other public infrastructure required on and off site; the inclusion of signs in development parks clearly indicating that they are intended for the general public; a requirement that at least 300 low income rental units be built; and the creation of a special fund dedicated to the construction of parks within the development using the money from the developer’s cash payments from public land use.

Those who voted in favor included Councilors David DeMott, Sarah Nurmela, Lindsey Smith, Rich Seymour and Mayor Nancy McNally.

Councilors Obi Ezeadi and Bruce Baker opposed it.

Developer Oread Capital wanted City Council to let them continue work on the project, which is designed to convert the large open space surrounding the church into Uplands, a sprawling mixed-use development, with housing options ranging from single-family homes to apartments. and townhouses as well as parks and shopping areas. The project would take several years to complete, eventually accommodating 2,350 housing units in a mix of housing types.

PLUS: Who are the parks for? The proposed housing development has neighbors in Westminster fighting for space.

Neighbors in the Shaw Heights neighborhood, many of whom opposed the plan, wanted the town to say no and keep the lot, known to them as Farm, undeveloped.

“It’s all I’ve ever known,” said John Palmer, who said he has lived in Westminster his entire life, most within sight of the farm.

For more on this story, visit westminsterwindow.com


We believe vital information must be seen by those affected, whether it is a public health crisis, investigative reporting or the empowerment of lawmakers. This report depends on supporting readers like you.


Source link

]]>
Alligators to be relocated after dog dies in Texas neighborhood https://sadc-tribunal.org/alligators-to-be-relocated-after-dog-dies-in-texas-neighborhood/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 17:24:39 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/alligators-to-be-relocated-after-dog-dies-in-texas-neighborhood/ ]]>

title=wpil_keyword_linkneighborhood after they allegedly kill a dog.” title=”Texas wildlife officials say they are working to remove alligators from an Austin, Texas neighborhood after they allegedly kill a dog.” loading=”lazy”/>

Texas wildlife officials say they are working to remove alligators from an Austin, Texas neighborhood after they allegedly kill a dog.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A group of alligators living in a retention pond in an Austin, Texas neighborhood will be removed after an alleged attack on a dog, state wildlife officials have said.

Earlier this month, Austin firefighters responded to a call from a resident of the Del Valle neighborhood in the southeast of the city, saying that a trio of alligators had killed a dog, a KXAN reported on December 3.

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department sent a game ranger to investigate and said they couldn’t prove there was an attack, the TV station said.

Although houses now fill the area, the neighborhood sits on what was once an alligator sanctuary, according to KXAN.

A resident who dialed 911 recalled the attack to KVUE.

“At that point, he was still screaming,” Crystal Jaime told the outlet. “But then you can hear an alligator growling.”

Jaime worries that dogs aren’t the only ones at risk.

“I just saw a group of kids the day before yesterday in the same area, catching minnows because there was a lot of water from the rain,” Jaime told KVUE. “So they’re in the same area where the dog and the alligators were. “

More recently, state wildlife officials said they plan to remove the animals from the neighborhood and place them elsewhere, according to a TPWD statement shared with McClatchy News on December 19.

State wildlife officials were initially reluctant to take action against the alligators, preferring to leave them alone, media reported.

The decision to remove the alligators comes after days of discussions with residents and leaders of the region, the statement said.

“Over the past few weeks, Texas game wardens and specialists from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) have worked closely with leaders and residents of Del Valle, listening to their concerns and sharing information about the habitat and behavior of alligators “, we can read. “For the safety of everyone involved, including wildlife, community representatives have made it clear their preference for alligators to be removed from the area and relocated.”

Officials said an “alligator specialist” would monitor the area and keep a close eye on alligators while TPWD prepares a plan of action.

It could take weeks or months before they are trapped and moved, the statement said.

Although alligators are not common in most of Texas, they are known to spread over about a third of the state, according to data from TPWD.

Screenshot (338) _fitted.png
Alligators are prevalent across much of Texas. Screenshot of TPWD.

Populations are most dense along the Gulf Coast, from Corpus Christi to Nacogdoches and everywhere in between – but they also roam as far inland as Fort Worth, San Antonio, Laredo, and Austin – s’ stopping right next to Waco.

There has been an increase in alligator sightings and encounters in the state, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported, but that’s less of an indication of a dramatically increasing alligator population as it is of a human population in full explosion.

“It’s just that we have more people in the state now than we’ve ever had,” said Jonathan Warner, a TPWD alligator expert at the Star-Telegram.

More people means more new construction, more new housing in alligator territory. But if there is a suitable body of water in a community, alligators won’t hesitate to use it, said Houston-based alligator hunter Chris Stephens.

“Every time we build a neighborhood with a whole bunch of ponds, we’re adding alligator habitat to the ecosystem,” Stephens said. “Alligators will naturally expand into a habitat that is there for them.”

Mitchell Willetts is a real-time reporter covering the central United States for McClatchy. He is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma and an outdoor enthusiast living in Texas.


Source link

]]>
The Viking Foundation awards grants to 12 local nonprofit organizations | Extra Quarter https://sadc-tribunal.org/the-viking-foundation-awards-grants-to-12-local-nonprofit-organizations-extra-quarter/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/the-viking-foundation-awards-grants-to-12-local-nonprofit-organizations-extra-quarter/ In addition to these contributions, the Viking Foundation has awarded a total of $ 30,000 to these nonprofits in Denver County, Colorado: Clothes to Kids, Cross Purpose, EarthLinks, Habitat for Humanity, Karis, Lucky to Ride , Rocky Mountain Children’s Health Foundation and Rocky Mountain Children’s Law Center; as well as $ 30,000 to non-profit organizations […]]]>

In addition to these contributions, the Viking Foundation has awarded a total of $ 30,000 to these nonprofits in Denver County, Colorado: Clothes to Kids, Cross Purpose, EarthLinks, Habitat for Humanity, Karis, Lucky to Ride , Rocky Mountain Children’s Health Foundation and Rocky Mountain Children’s Law Center; as well as $ 30,000 to non-profit organizations in Polk County, Iowa: The Ankeny Klothing Exchange (TAKE), Children’s Cancer Connection, Community Hand Up, Des Moines Pastoral Care, Des Moines Refugee Support, Everybody Wins Iowa and Woodworking with a Purpose.

The Viking Foundation was established to help improve and enrich the lives of people, especially children, who are less fortunate. The foundation provides charitable grants to 501 (c) (3) organizations primarily in three counties. The grants are intended for those who face issues related to poverty, housing, gender, education, mental and physical health, etc.

The deadline for submitting 2022 grant proposals is October 1. For detailed information on the foundation and its history, values ​​and proposal guidelines, visit vikingfoundation.webs.com.


Source link

]]>
🌱 New neighborhood NMB + Loans from the cops of Fallen Grand Strand paid https://sadc-tribunal.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-new-neighborhood-nmb-loans-from-the-cops-of-fallen-grand-strand-paid/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 22:23:16 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-new-neighborhood-nmb-loans-from-the-cops-of-fallen-grand-strand-paid/ Have a nice day, neighbors! It’s me again, Kathy mandell, your host from Myrtle Beach daily. Here is an overview of the weather and events for the coming weekend, as well as today’s best stories. First, your weather forecast for the weekend: Friday: Hot with periods of sunshine. High: 72 Low: 58. Saturday: Warm with […]]]>

Have a nice day, neighbors! It’s me again, Kathy mandell, your host from Myrtle Beach daily. Here is an overview of the weather and events for the coming weekend, as well as today’s best stories.


First, your weather forecast for the weekend:

  • Friday: Hot with periods of sunshine. High: 72 Low: 58.
  • Saturday: Warm with clouds and sun. High: 72 Low: 60.
  • Sunday: Cooler with heavy showers. High: 62 Low: 38.

Congratulations to our first local sponsor:

Medicare registration may be closed for the season, but if you are under 65 or would like a private health insurance plan, you can still enroll. Lapiere and Josie Senior Insurance Consultants, trusted local agents in Myrtle Beach, are here to help. Three in five people who get a plan through them end up with a no-cost bonus. Visit lapiereandjosie.com to learn more.

Want to see your business featured in this location? Click here to see the options.


Here are the best stories today in Myrtle Beach:

  1. North Myrtle Beach City Council approved plans for a new housing development along Little River Neck Road. The plot of land is along the Intracoastal waterway and will bring 250 housing units in the neighborhood, with a private marina, 50 slipways, restaurant and boat store. Residents have expressed concerns about traffic on the one-way, one-way road. The construction is should start about a year from now on. (WMBF) (WPDE)
  2. A kidnapped woman from Summerville, South Carolina back with his family. A myrtle beach man is in custody at Georgetown County Detention Center after a Pawleys Island Publix customer complained to the store manager that a man was trying to lure her into a camper van in the store parking lot. Georgetown County Sheriff the deputies answered the call, and found the camper van in the Food Lion parking lot near the Publix. Inside the van they discovered the man, who was wanted for kidnapping, and they Safe the kidnapping victim. (WPDE)
  3. the Department of Health and Environmental Control ring the bell announcing high demand for COVID tests Before the holidays. One Myrtle Beach Airport test site knew long queues for testing already, mainly for people going on cruises or traveling abroad. The agency urges anyone who wants test results in hand before Christmas eve should get tested no later than December 18, and expect processing delays. (WBTW)
  4. Some South Carolina Senators Push Legislation who would help people who have been made redundant on immunization mandates financial compensation. The bill proposes that if a person in South Carolina was fired for not having received a COVID-19 shot, they would be entitled to unemployment benefits. As it stands, the people dismissed for this reason are not entitled to unemployment benefit. Lawmakers say they are against the mandates, but not against the coup. They say it should be up to an individual to make the decision on taking a vaccine. (WBTW)
  5. The well-known charity, Tunnel to Towers Foundation, paid off three mortgages on the houses of fallen officers in South Carolina. North Myrtle Beach Mortgages Sgt. Gordon Best, died in the performance of his duties on January 1, 2021, and Detective James Giery of Myrtle Beach, who died in 2016 of cancer linked to his service with the NYPD on September 11 while serving as an officer in New York, were paid by the foundation this week. The mortgage of Fallen Deputy Sheriff Jonathan Price house in Marion County was also paid. (WPDE)

Today’s Myrtle Beach Daily is presented in part by our friends at Verizon. They are building the fastest 5G network in the country. To learn how 5G will change lives for you and your community – and to access this amazing technology – click here. And thank you Verizon for sponsoring this community resource in Myrtle Beach!


This weekend in Myrtle Beach:

Friday 17th December

  • Red Cross Blood Drive @ Tanger Outlets, North Kings Road (11:00)
  • Mark Starnes @ Ocean Annie’s Beach Bar (1:00 p.m.)
  • River Island Christmas Trail is now open at Longs. Reservations required. (5:00 p.m.) from now until December 23. Prices vary depending on the type and size of the vehicle.
  • The Great Christmas Light Show @ NMB Park & ​​Sports Complex (5:30 p.m.)
  • Duo Harlequin @ The Marina Bar (7:00 p.m.)

Saturday, December 18

  • Christmas on the Farm @ Freewoods Farm (10:00 AM)
  • Dedication of the book Death Washes Ashore @ Forever Revolutionary (11:00)
  • Wicked Holiday Market @ Wicked Tuna Murrells Inlet (12h00)
  • Dive Theater: The Polar Express @ Ripley’s Aquarium in Myrtle Beach (5:00 p.m.)
  • Trey Calloway Christmas Show @ Local on the Water (6:00 p.m.)
  • 80s Christmas Party with Miracle Max and Animal Monsters @ Neal & Pam’s (20:00)

Sunday 19 December

  • Bear Baker @ Beer 30 Bar & Grill (15:00)
  • Winter Wonderland at the Beach @ Burroughs & Chapin Pavilion Place (15:00)
  • Night of a Thousand Candles @ Brookgreen Gardens (4:00 p.m.)
  • Jim Quick & Coastline Christmas Show @ Local On The Water (6:00 p.m.)

From my notebook:

  • The Humane Society of North Myrtle Beach: We have 10 cats in our care at the moment that need sponsors NOW! What does a sponsor do? It’s simple! You sponsor a pet for $ 50, which helps to cover the cost of food and preventive care while the animal is in our care. (Facebook)
  • Myrtle Beach Mini Marathon: the RACE PASS 2022 is here!! We have a very limited amount of RACE PASS for the 2022 season! This means that you can choose 5 of our 2022 races for the lowest price of the year! PLUS, as added bonus, you will receive a #RunMyrtleBeach hoodie. (Instagram)
  • Myrtle Beach Area Chamber of Commerce did three announcements this week. Registration is now open for the 2022 MLK Drum Majors Parade. The event will take place January 15, 2022, 10:00 AM (Patch) Registrations are also open for the Annual trade show for NGC members to members it will happen January 20 at the MB Convention Center. (Patch) The The NGCAC also reports this new air passenger traffic records have been set at Myrtle Beach International Airport in November. (Room)
  • Brookgreen Gardens will display a special sculpture exhibition created by its founder, Anna hyatt huntington. The exhibition will be visible in the Rosen galleries to Brookgreen, from January 29 to April 24, 2022. Huntington has made his property a public sculpture garden in the 1930s, and the Gardens are today a National historic monument. (holycitysinner.com)
  • Sands Companies announced than the chalets of the swell Apartment houses are now rented out at Murrells Inlet. The 221 isolated and horizontal country houses are located at 1501 Flatwood Street less than a mile from Garden City Beach. (Room)
  • Good Day Café in Myrtle Beach will be open on christmas day, and has a special christmas dinner for people who are homeless, live alone or are unable to cook on their own. Dinner is open at those in need, and Good Day Café is looking for volunteers to help that day. Dinner is scheduled from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.. (WPDE)

More from our sponsors – thank you for supporting the local news!

Events:


Do you like the Myrtle Beach Daily? Here are all the ways you can get more involved:


Now you are in the know and ready to get out of this Friday. To all Saturday for another Myrtle Beach update!

Kathy mandell

About me: The best decision I’ve ever made was to move from New England to the Myrtle Beach area a few years ago with my three dogs and three cats. I love dogs, cats, road trips, photography, writing, vegetarian food, live music, biking and most of all my daily walks on the beaches of the Grand Strand and surrounding areas.



Source link

]]>
City of Medford examines proposed neighborhood built in 3D https://sadc-tribunal.org/city-of-medford-examines-proposed-neighborhood-built-in-3d/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 07:16:28 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/city-of-medford-examines-proposed-neighborhood-built-in-3d/ ]]>

MEDFORD, Oregon – NBC5 News reported that an Ashland-based nonprofit was building an entire neighborhood with 3D printing. On Tuesday, the project was brought to the City of Medford.

More than a year after the Almeda fire, thousands of houses have burned down. Local, state and federal leaders are working together to meet the growing housing needs in the community. One of the ideas is a first of its kind.

“What makes this new spiritual village really unique is the construction techniques, and that would be a 3D imprint,” said Rich Rosenthal, Town of Medford.

This is something the city of Medford has declared that has never been done before in the United States. But the Ashland-based Thalden Foundation told the Medford Parks and Recreation committee it was affordable, fast and safe.

“In addition to the 3D printed concrete walls, these are fire and storm resistant houses. These are constructed from non-toxic and non-flammable materials. What we do saves time, materials and labor, ”said Barry Thalden.

The proposed New Spirit Village will be right next to Lewis Park in Medford. During Tuesday’s meeting heads were raised with excitement of what this may mean for Medford housing.

“I really think we have to find a way to capture some of the momentum and support for this,” said Julian Cordle, City of Medford.

Real estate developers hope to innovate next summer.

Copyright 2021 California-Oregon Broadcasting, Inc.


Source link

]]>