Neighborhood – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 19:31:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sadc-tribunal.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/favicon-1.png Neighborhood – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ 32 32 The City begins to plan the revitalization of the neighborhood https://sadc-tribunal.org/the-city-begins-to-plan-the-revitalization-of-the-neighborhood/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 17:17:49 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/the-city-begins-to-plan-the-revitalization-of-the-neighborhood/ Wichita Falls will undertake a multi-year effort to revitalize old, declining neighborhoods in the central section of town. The plans were formed after city staff held meetings with residents starting last September and were presented to city council on Tuesday. The area includes neighborhoods south of Seymour Highway, west of Brook Avenue, north of Kell […]]]>

Wichita Falls will undertake a multi-year effort to revitalize old, declining neighborhoods in the central section of town.

The plans were formed after city staff held meetings with residents starting last September and were presented to city council on Tuesday.

The area includes neighborhoods south of Seymour Highway, west of Brook Avenue, north of Kell Freeway, and east of Kemp Boulevard. Many of the houses in these neighborhoods are centuries old. Deputy city manager Paul Menzies said 70% of homes are now rentals.

Director of Developmental Services Terry Floyd said residents’ responses ranged from broad to specific. The people who participated wanted to preserve the existing structures and trees and improve the quality of life.

As a result, Floyd offered specific suggestions to include assigning a code enforcement officer to the area and improving the property maintenance code.

“We’ve heard that a lot,” Floyd said.

The city council is considering adopting housing and urban development standards for rental properties in the central section of Wichita Falls.

Another resident complaint was about junk cars. Floyd suggested revisions to the city’s unserviceable vehicle ordinance.

“Other cities have made changes to their ordinances to help remove them instead of just verbalizing them,” he said.

He also suggested council could consider a tenancy registration program.

“There are many, many good landlords in the area. We also have landlords who do not take good care of their property.

]]>
Neighborhood Health Services Consider Transformation https://sadc-tribunal.org/neighborhood-health-services-consider-transformation/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 09:07:14 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/neighborhood-health-services-consider-transformation/ PLAINFIELD – Neighborhood Health Services Corp., formerly known as Plainfield Health Center, will launch a $5.5 million community campaign to upgrade its facilities and acquire advanced technology to strengthen access to health care for the underserved and uninsured. Neighborhood Health, with a main office at 1700 Myrtle Ave., a full-service office in Elizabeth, and satellite […]]]>
]]>
Residents complain about trash-filled lot in Cleveland neighborhood https://sadc-tribunal.org/residents-complain-about-trash-filled-lot-in-cleveland-neighborhood/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 17:07:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/residents-complain-about-trash-filled-lot-in-cleveland-neighborhood/ CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) — Neighbors on West 95th Street in Cleveland are proud of their yards, but in February they said property values ​​had started to drop. According to locals, it was because a house was demolished and no one came to clean up the damage. “When I first passed here, it started to smell […]]]>

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) — Neighbors on West 95th Street in Cleveland are proud of their yards, but in February they said property values ​​had started to drop.

According to locals, it was because a house was demolished and no one came to clean up the damage.

“When I first passed here, it started to smell like spring,” a neighbor told 19 News.

Since then, people have made the problem worse by adding their own trash to the heap.

There are mattresses and caddies, even a toilet is in the front yard.

Some neighbors contacted the city in the hope of getting help. But at first glance, it seems that nothing has been done.

So they called the 19 News troubleshooting team, and we reached out to Councilwoman Jenny Spencer.

We received this statement:

The conditions at this establishment are unacceptable. The Ward 15 Council Office has been working closely with the Building and Housing Department to have the debris removed from this property as soon as possible. It is hoped that the integrity of the neighborhood will be restored immediately following City-required procedures scheduled for next week.

We weren’t given a specific time frame for the procedure, or a day when the mess could be cleaned up.

Our team will follow up with Spencer early next week.

Copyright 2022 WOIO. All rights reserved.

]]>
‘Chicago Tonight’ in your neighborhood: Fuller Park | Chicago News https://sadc-tribunal.org/chicago-tonight-in-your-neighborhood-fuller-park-chicago-news/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 20:48:45 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/chicago-tonight-in-your-neighborhood-fuller-park-chicago-news/ Fuller Park is a small community area on the south side of Chicago, located just off the Dan Ryan Freeway. Although it’s considered one of Chicago’s smallest and poorest neighborhoods, community leaders have been investing in the neighborhood for years. Interactive map: More information on our community reporting series The Eden Place Nature Center, which […]]]>

Fuller Park is a small community area on the south side of Chicago, located just off the Dan Ryan Freeway. Although it’s considered one of Chicago’s smallest and poorest neighborhoods, community leaders have been investing in the neighborhood for years.

Interactive map: More information on our community reporting series

The Eden Place Nature Center, which was once an illegal dump, is now an urban oasis for residents.

Founders Michael Howard and his wife Amelia Howard have dedicated years of their lives to educating and providing services to the neighborhood. They run the non-profit Eden Place Farms where they teach young people to farm and connect with nature by providing the community with a safe place to learn.

“Our mission is to help improve the quality of life for all of our neighbors,” Howard said. “We’ve helped close mortgages, we help people get mortgages, we do financial literacy, and we ran one of the longest-running job training programs in the city, teaching job skills in construction. to guys right down the street.”

The Howards said they were hit hard by the pandemic and had to temporarily close the farm, but they used their savings to help support families in the area.

According to the founders, around 10,000 people have passed through the farm over the past 20 years, and although many have left the neighborhood, the Howards have vowed to stay.

“I have to stay with a good positive outlook because a lot of people don’t have the same resources as me,” Howard said. “I have an education, but my wife and I chose to be here to help others get to where we are. We could have left years ago… but we know our work here is not done.

Meanwhile, residents pointed to another strong community pillar: Thomas A. Hendricks Community Academy. It is the only remaining elementary school in the area after Parkman Elementary closed during the 2013 school closings.

For the past eight years, Sandee McDonald has been a Principal at Hendricks, where she held various positions for over 15 years. She is now retired.

“Community means so much to me, having taught here in the 90s,” McDonald said. “I worked on building a learning culture and climate, making sure the materials, the resources all spoke to my children…that they felt loved and nurtured. I have worked to bring highly qualified personnel here. We need to make sure, as educators, that we find the strength in the children. We are a hidden gem here in Fuller Park.

Fuller Park by the numbers

Fewer than 4,000 people live in Fuller Park, where about 55% of area families earn a median household income of less than $25,000 a year, according to the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning.

Jacqueline Russell, a longtime Fuller Park resident, says the community is often overlooked when it comes to federal funding and there’s a lack of businesses and restaurants.

“I would rather put money back in my own community than drive somewhere else,” Russell said. “Most of the time I have to drive to 103rd to get something to eat, so the few places we have here, we have to try to keep them.”

Located in Fuller Park, the South Side Community Federal Credit Union is one of two nonprofit minority-owned financial institutions in Illinois.

South Side native Gregg Brown, who is the CEO and chairman, said his goal is to provide South Side residents with financial tools to help them own homes, create savings plans and give people the opportunity to own businesses in their community.

“It’s very difficult for most businesses in this community because you’re targeting a population that has a high poverty rate and a high unemployment rate. Revenues are very low, so it’s very difficult for businesses to compete in today’s market,” Brown said. “However, we can change all of that and that’s what I’ve dedicated my life to seeing how I can be an agent of change to spur what we really need: economic movement.”

Aldus. Pat Dowell (3rd Ward) said the economic recovery in Fuller Park is underway, with more investment in the neighborhood lately.

“I am surprised to receive many requests for city-owned land to build housing in Fuller Park,” Dowell said. “A few years ago that wasn’t the case, but since the pandemic lifted people are starting to express more interest in Fuller Park. We also have a major development underway on 43rd and Wells: a car wash and laundromat. [It’s] much needed not only to serve Fuller Park, but to the surrounding communities.

Video: Watch our full interview with Ald. Pat Dowell.


Fuller Park also has a high concentration of churches per capita. The Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church on Princeton Avenue is just one of them.

Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church Chief of Staff Lemont Watson has been a member since he was 12 years old.

“It’s about saving souls, that’s the ultimate goal, but it’s about meeting needs first,” Watson said. “That’s one of our pastor’s visions: meeting the needs.”

The ministry runs a pantry every Wednesday and hopes to reopen its weekly soup kitchen held every Thursday in the church basement early next month.

“Even during the pandemic, we had food giveaways,” Watson said. “Since we couldn’t get into the building, we moved into the parking lot, and it was big where cars can just come in and give them a box of food and stuff. So it was really essential not only for the community of Fuller Park, but it also really helped a lot of families.

Video: Watch our full interview with Sandee McDonald.


Even though residents say Fuller Park lacks investment and is underserved, people are investing their time in uplifting the community like Michael Howard, who believes helping people gain knowledge will lead to greater change.

“We can see that we’ve caused a wave in people’s families where their lives have improved, where they now have a better understanding of the environmental risks that they could protect their families from,” he said. “They also have a better quality of life because we take them camping, fishing, canoeing. We take them on hikes and to parts of the country they’ve probably never been before.

Community Report Series

“Chicago Tonight” is expanding its community reporting. We’re taking to the streets to talk with your neighbors, local businesses, agencies and leaders about COVID-19, the economy, racial justice, education and more. See where we went and what we learned using the map below. Or select a community using the drop-down menu. Dots in red represent our COVID-19 Across Chicago series; blue marks our “Chicago Tonight” series in Your Neighborhood.


]]>
Governor Evers takes a walking tour of the historic Garden Homes district and discusses improvements to public safety https://sadc-tribunal.org/governor-evers-takes-a-walking-tour-of-the-historic-garden-homes-district-and-discusses-improvements-to-public-safety/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 19:42:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/governor-evers-takes-a-walking-tour-of-the-historic-garden-homes-district-and-discusses-improvements-to-public-safety/ MILWAUKEE (CBS 58) – Milwaukee leaders led Gov. Tony Evers on a walk through the city’s historic Garden Homes neighborhood on Wednesday. Beginning at The New Hope Missionary Baptist Church and ending at Engine House 36, Evers stopped at parks, homes and businesses along the route where community leaders and members pointed out parts of […]]]>

MILWAUKEE (CBS 58) – Milwaukee leaders led Gov. Tony Evers on a walk through the city’s historic Garden Homes neighborhood on Wednesday.

Beginning at The New Hope Missionary Baptist Church and ending at Engine House 36, Evers stopped at parks, homes and businesses along the route where community leaders and members pointed out parts of the neighborhood that thrive and the parts that struggle.

“There’s a lot to do here in this neighborhood,” Ald said. said Ashanti Hamilton. “It’s a place where you have all the ingredients to improve your neighborhood. Great churches, great institutions, but there are challenges.”

Challenges that business owners and community members see first-hand every day and hope city and state leaders will prioritize.

“We would sit on this park (bench) and, you know, daydream about what we could do in this neighborhood,” one woman told Evers.

The purpose of the march was to speak about public safety and to invest in the prevention of violence.

Evers has committed more than $100 million to community safety efforts in Milwaukee since 2019.

“Quality of life is a really big part of that,” Evers said.

Local leaders said improving housing, health care, transportation and economic development will bring lasting change to the community, but said it’s not something the city can tackle alone .

Evers pledged his support.

“A lot of people here are working hard to make this neighborhood a really special place again,” Evers said. “The State of Wisconsin needs to be part of it.”

Evers said he plans to report what he learned when he returns to Capitol Hill.

]]>
The new Northern Citizens Council inaugurates the neighborhood center https://sadc-tribunal.org/the-new-northern-citizens-council-inaugurates-the-neighborhood-center/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 20:11:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/the-new-northern-citizens-council-inaugurates-the-neighborhood-center/ A neighborhood in Springfield, Massachusetts, has longed for a community center for decades. Now it’s just over a year. The groundbreaking ceremony in the North End neighborhood on Monday for the $15 million project led by the New North Citizens Council drew more than 100 people. In addition to meeting rooms, the new center will […]]]>

A neighborhood in Springfield, Massachusetts, has longed for a community center for decades. Now it’s just over a year.

The groundbreaking ceremony in the North End neighborhood on Monday for the $15 million project led by the New North Citizens Council drew more than 100 people.

In addition to meeting rooms, the new center will have a full gymnasium, a medical clinic and will be the headquarters of the New North Citizens Council, which is both a civic association and a social service agency for the Hispanic population. growing in the region. This will put all programs including housing, violence prevention, food security and youth mentoring under one roof, said Maria Ligus, executive director of New North.

“A one-stop shop – it will be a hub of activity,” Ligus said. “We’re pretty excited.”

A combination of public and private funds is financing the project.

Massachusetts Congressman Richard Neal said he urged New North to apply for money from the American Rescue Plan Act and the city of Springfield has pledged to give the project $2.5 million. dollars from its ARPA fund allocation.

“It was the professionalism of advocacy,” Neal explained. “We got together and they said can you see what you can do to use some of the federal money to build this neighborhood center and that’s exactly what we’re going to do.”

The Massachusetts Legislature approved a $1 million bond for the project.

During the inauguration of the works, Dennis Duquette, president of the MassMutual Foundation, announced a contribution of 1.5 million dollars.

The new center is named after Barbara Rivera, the late community activist who served as New North’s executive director for many years. His three daughters took part in the inauguration of the works. Janet Rodriquez Denny said it was a happy day for the family.

“We are so honored that they remember my mother,” she said. “We are honored that they still remember her and continue her legacy.”

The center is moving up onto a large vacant lot on Chestnut Street where Chestnut Junior High School once stood. It was badly damaged by fire and demolished in 2014. The city sold the land to New North for $150,000.

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno said the new center will be a huge asset to the North End.

“The North End is a hidden gem – beautiful families, beautiful homes, beautiful businesses starting to open now,” he said.

The target date for the opening of the building is September 2023. It would coincide with the 50e anniversary of the founding of the New North Citizens Council.

]]>
JM Family Enterprises Sponsors 4 Habitat Homes in Historic Pompano Beach – WSVN 7News | Miami News, Weather, Sports https://sadc-tribunal.org/jm-family-enterprises-sponsors-4-habitat-homes-in-historic-pompano-beach-wsvn-7news-miami-news-weather-sports/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 00:24:11 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/jm-family-enterprises-sponsors-4-habitat-homes-in-historic-pompano-beach-wsvn-7news-miami-news-weather-sports/ POMPANO BEACH, FL. (WSVN) – An auto company is among several businesses breathing new life into a historic South Florida neighborhood, helping families achieve their homeownership goals as part of a Habitat for Humanity. 7News cameras captured families and local leaders at a ribbon-cutting ceremony in the Collier City neighborhood of Pompano Beach on Saturday […]]]>

POMPANO BEACH, FL. (WSVN) – An auto company is among several businesses breathing new life into a historic South Florida neighborhood, helping families achieve their homeownership goals as part of a Habitat for Humanity.

7News cameras captured families and local leaders at a ribbon-cutting ceremony in the Collier City neighborhood of Pompano Beach on Saturday morning.

JM Family Enterprises is sponsoring four homes as part of efforts to revitalize a historic black neighborhood in desperate need of a facelift.

“These are our 40th, 41st, 42nd, 43rd houses, and I say houses. It’s not just houses,” said company CEO Brent Burns.

These homes will go a long way in literally rebuilding the neighborhood in one of the most economically disadvantaged ZIP codes in Broward County.

Habitat for Humanity of Broward joins the City of Pompano Beach, individual donors and corporations to make the dream of homeownership a reality.

Nguyen Tran, director of the Pompano Beach Community Redevelopment Agency, said this project took years to prepare.

“It started in 2015. Those lots that CRA gave to Habitat weren’t buildable as single family homes, so the city had to come in and change the codes to allow single family homes,” he said. he said, “and then it took Habitat’s nonprofit partnership to make it happen with eligible buyers, and of course, the private sector coming in to sponsor these homes.

“It’s such a great story and, I believe, a national role model. It’s the epitome of Habitat’s mission, which is to build homes, communities and hope,” said Nancy Robin, CEO of Habitat for Humanity Broward.

There are already 100 Habitat homes in this community. The partnership transforms vacant lots into 12 homes, giving four families the opportunity to get a taste of home ownership.

“Well, it’s really about affordable housing, which is so badly needed right now,” Burns said.

The Pompano Beach ARC initiated improvements to streetlights and landscaping. They also added a new Broward Sheriff’s Office substation.

Meondae Stanley, his wife and two sons move from an apartment in an industrial area of ​​Pompano Beach to a brand new community and a four-bedroom, two-bathroom home, plus an interest-free mortgage.

“It feels good today, I promise,” he said.

The new owner said he was grateful to everyone who made the day possible.

“Seeing CEOs, people who have been in their jobs… come out when they’ve worked 40 hours a week, they come out and they help me. They don’t know me from a can of paint, and they came to help me,” Stanley said. “We are stepping in as good individuals and good citizens and creating a better place, and for a better environment.”

WSVN is a proud sponsor of Habitat for Humanity.

Broward County Habitat for Humanity
www.habitatbroward.org

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Miami
www.miamihabitat.org

Copyright 2022 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Join our newsletter for the latest news straight to your inbox

]]>
The Pullman Neighborhood is a Time Capsule – Chicago Magazine https://sadc-tribunal.org/the-pullman-neighborhood-is-a-time-capsule-chicago-magazine/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 15:32:33 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/the-pullman-neighborhood-is-a-time-capsule-chicago-magazine/ Pullman is unlike anywhere else in Chicago, or even the Midwest. Its townhouse blocks, with American flags hanging from brackets bolted into the brick, and rose gardens blooming in the tiny courtyards, make it look like an older neighborhood in one of the old coastal and colonial cities: Boston, Philadelphia or Baltimore. Pullman, of course, […]]]>

Pullman is unlike anywhere else in Chicago, or even the Midwest. Its townhouse blocks, with American flags hanging from brackets bolted into the brick, and rose gardens blooming in the tiny courtyards, make it look like an older neighborhood in one of the old coastal and colonial cities: Boston, Philadelphia or Baltimore.

Pullman, of course, was not meant to be part of Chicago. It was one of America’s first planned industrial communities, built between 1880 and 1892 to house the workers, craftsmen, and managers of the Pullman’s Palace Car Company, which built the most lavish railcars of the railroad era. iron. Founder George Pullman was partly inspired by Saltair, a textile town near Leeds, England.

Last Labor Day, Pullman was dedicated a national monument in a ceremony attended by the Secretary of Labor, the Governor and the two Senators. The park service has opened a museum that tells the story of the company. At the end of the 19e and early 20e Over the centuries, a Pullman sleeper was the equivalent of a private jet, and the word “Pullman” was synonymous with luxury, as much as Cadillac later. The Pullman Strike of 1894, broken up by federal troops, was a bloody shirt for the labor movement. Air travel and highways have made passenger trains an anachronism; the last Pullman wagon was built in 1982.

If you visit the museum, be sure to take a walk around the neighborhood. Pullman’s motive in owning his employees’ housing was profit: he deducted rent from their paychecks. But he built houses of high quality and architectural distinction – fireplaces, woodwork, paneling, dormers. More than a century after the Illinois Supreme Court forced the Pullman Company out of the housing business, it has resulted in an unusual legacy, especially for Chicago: Pullman is an island of integration in the Otherwise secluded Far South Side. According to the latest census, the neighborhood bounded by the Illinois Central Railroad, 111th Street, Bishop Ford Expressway and 115th Street is 45% black, 32% white and 24% Latino – numbers close to those in the city as a whole, but found almost nowhere in the same place.

Last week, I strolled through the neighborhood with Mike Shymanski, who moved to Pullman in 1967 as a young, newly married architect, drawn to “the diversity of habitat.” It was on a pedestrian scale, because of the density of townhouses, you got to know the people in your block. At that time, it was a real convenient neighborhood. There were half a dozen bars, grocery stores, restaurants. Michigan Avenue was a major retail business. We actually operated for two years without a car.

Pullman almost didn’t go that far. In 1959, the city proposed to demolish it and replace it with an industrial park to serve the port of Calumet, which was booming after the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway: “at that time, the old buildings were badly seen. The Pullman buildings were 80 years old and the older buildings could be called replacements.

The Pullman Civic Organization resisted the plan. Pullman was spared and remained racially stable, although the white flight upended the demographics of nearby Roseland—another change Pullman resisted. Shymanski lives on Arcade Row, a block of houses with mansard roofs and wooden porches, which today are occupied by the same class of people that Pullman built it: white-collar workers. Every original Pullman home is a historic landmark, so residents can’t alter the exterior of their home without permission from the city, but the people who move in love it like this: “There’s has people who were drawn to the neighborhood because of the historic character,” Shymanski said. “There are all kinds of people living in these houses: educators, engineers, skilled workers.”

(south of 111e Street, 90 percent of the houses are original. North of 111e, the figure is 30%. North Pullman is almost exclusively black and low-income. It is home to the A. Philip Randolph Pullman Porter Museum, currently closed for expansion. The Pullman Porters, all African American, “were the unofficial distribution arm of the Chicago Defender and the Pittsburgh Mailsaid director David Peterson. “That’s how people discovered the opportunities here. It was the driving force behind the Great Migration. “)

Pullmanites certainly feel like they live in a “special place,” as Shymanski puts it. They show off their neighborhood with walking tours on the first Sunday of each month. The Historic Pullman Garden Walk takes place on June 25 and the Historic Pullman House Tour on October 8 and 9. The Historic Pullman Foundation would like to see the reopening of the Hotel Florence, which served Sunday brunches until 2000, when it was closed for renovations by its owner, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. These renovations are still ongoing.

In this neighborhood of landmarks, no landmark is more striking than Greenstone United Methodist Church, designed in 1882 by the architect of Pullman’s house, Solomon Spencer Beman, and built from moss-colored stone mined in Pennsylvania. The shrine seats 600 people, but on most Sundays Reverend Luther Mason preaches to 15 to 25 mostly black parishioners and struggles to attract a cross section of the community.

“During the pandemic, we had the best time of diversity,” said Mason, who lives in the presbytery on rue Saint-Laurent. “When we were inside, it was our own little team, but when we went out on Solomon’s porch, we had blacks, whites, Latinos.”

From the back of the sanctuary, an arched stained glass window, shaped like the eye of God, casts tinted light over empty pews, peeling paint, cracked walls and a manual organ as old as the building. Many churches with such meager congregations have closed. Not Greenstone. Nothing is torn down at Pullman; this sense of permanence keeps people in the neighborhood for decades, if not generations. (Shymanski’s son and daughter live in Pullman.) Greenstone is a historic congregation, in a historic building.

“We fought for workers’ rights during the strike,” Mason said. “We organized the rescue. Round. [William H.] Carwardine, he wrote the book, Pullman’s story, which led the Illinois Supreme Court to force Pullman to divest itself of the housing. The church could be sold and turned into a recital hall and B&B, but I’ll be damned if that happens while I’m here.

Preservations will also be cursed. Over the past year and a half, Greenstone has received a $145,000 grant from the National Trust for Historic Preservation to stabilize its steeple and repair its roof, and $1.08 million from the city’s Adopt-a-Landmark program to repair the steeple. . The church also needs to replace the stone, which has been broken down by decades of acid rain. The new coating will be mixed with jade-colored serpentine stone to maintain its greenish color. The stones will look “exactly like the original”, Mason promised.

That’s what Pullman wants to hear. A New York Times A columnist once wrote that no American city has changed as much in the last 30 years as Chicago. Pullman hasn’t changed much, however. George Pullman died in 1897, but he would still recognize his industrial village.

Related Content

]]>
Residents of this SF neighborhood are suing the city over sinking streets and sidewalks https://sadc-tribunal.org/residents-of-this-sf-neighborhood-are-suing-the-city-over-sinking-streets-and-sidewalks/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 22:19:01 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/residents-of-this-sf-neighborhood-are-suing-the-city-over-sinking-streets-and-sidewalks/ Residents of San Francisco’s Mission Bay neighborhood, where streets are sinking and curbs and sidewalks are cracking, are suing the city for repairs and damages, saying officials made the wrong decision to approve construction above above a weak embankment. The 303 acres between Interstate 280 and the San Francisco Bay, now home to 6,000 residential […]]]>

Residents of San Francisco’s Mission Bay neighborhood, where streets are sinking and curbs and sidewalks are cracking, are suing the city for repairs and damages, saying officials made the wrong decision to approve construction above above a weak embankment.

The 303 acres between Interstate 280 and the San Francisco Bay, now home to 6,000 residential units, was part of the bay before it was filled with rocks and dirt in the late 1800s. And when the city ​​approved development in 1998 of the Mission Bay neighborhood, complete with homes, businesses, schools and a hospital, according to the lawsuit, city officials ignored the weakness of the underlying land.

“While the Mission Bay embankment has settled over the years, due to the load of improvements and environmental conditions, and continues to settle, into the clay and mud below, the improvements of the ‘infrastructure sank and continues to sink,’ said attorneys for the plaintiffs, who own a condominium in the neighborhood.

The result, they said, was “inappropriate grades on … ramps and sidewalks, cracks in sidewalks with associated tripping hazards, reconfigured drainage patterns and … unsightly gaps around utility poles and fire hydrants, as well as unsafe curb sizes that impose safety hazards for pedestrians.

]]>
Waynesboro seeks to revitalize historic Port Republic https://sadc-tribunal.org/waynesboro-seeks-to-revitalize-historic-port-republic/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 23:33:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/waynesboro-seeks-to-revitalize-historic-port-republic/ WAYNESBORO, Va. (WHSV) – In Waynesboro, city and community leaders held a Thursday-Saturday workshop to find ways to revitalize the city’s historic Port Republic neighborhood. The African American Historic District is the oldest intact in Waynesboro. It merged as a community in 1870 when formerly enslaved African Americans moved to the area. Throughout the three-day […]]]>

WAYNESBORO, Va. (WHSV) – In Waynesboro, city and community leaders held a Thursday-Saturday workshop to find ways to revitalize the city’s historic Port Republic neighborhood.

The African American Historic District is the oldest intact in Waynesboro. It merged as a community in 1870 when formerly enslaved African Americans moved to the area.

Throughout the three-day workshop, residents and community organizations worked with the city to come up with ideas to address residents’ concerns, improve the neighborhood and preserve its history.

“Improving historical signage, historical markers, providing museum exhibits, that sort of thing. And then also the improvement of sidewalks, public space and green spaces, as well as the maintenance of properties. I think property maintenance has been a big theme, especially with away owners,” said Waynesboro community development manager Luke Juday.

Juday said absentee landlords, property maintenance, public infrastructure and lack of connection in the neighborhood were the main concerns for residents.

The workshop discussions will be used to create a community action plan that the city hopes to begin implementing in the coming months.

“I’m thrilled that it’s a place where people can live and that feels three-dimensional, that feels like a place that has a richness that they maybe don’t get in a regular housing lane. I think it’s a good thing for the city,” Juday said.

Copyright 2022 WHSV. All rights reserved.

]]>