Neighborhood – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 02:24:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://sadc-tribunal.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/favicon-1.png Neighborhood – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ 32 32 Water, traffic among concerns expressed at Tech Ridge Open House in St. George – St George News http://sadc-tribunal.org/water-traffic-among-concerns-expressed-at-tech-ridge-open-house-in-st-george-st-george-news/ http://sadc-tribunal.org/water-traffic-among-concerns-expressed-at-tech-ridge-open-house-in-st-george-st-george-news/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 01:26:07 +0000 http://sadc-tribunal.org/water-traffic-among-concerns-expressed-at-tech-ridge-open-house-in-st-george-st-george-news/ ST. GEORGE – Isaac Barlow had just completed a presentation outlining an updated vision of the 20-year project to an audience of around 150 who had gathered in the gymnasium at Vasion’s headquarters when the questions started. Isaac Barlow, Managing Partner of Tech Ridge, presents at Vasion Gymnasium, St. George, Utah September 21, 2021 | […]]]>

ST. GEORGE – Isaac Barlow had just completed a presentation outlining an updated vision of the 20-year project to an audience of around 150 who had gathered in the gymnasium at Vasion’s headquarters when the questions started.

Isaac Barlow, Managing Partner of Tech Ridge, presents at Vasion Gymnasium, St. George, Utah September 21, 2021 | Photo by David Dudley, St. George News

Barlow said he knew it was going to happen. He had spent three evenings last week knocking on community doors to involve more Tech Ridge neighbors in the conversation.

The questions, which concerned the impact on traffic and whether there would be enough water, didn’t seem to rattle Barlow, who is the CEO of busybusy, as well as the managing partner of Tech Ridge.

“We’ve been thinking about these things from the start,” Barlow told St. George News.

Many members of the community have expressed concerns about the impact and traffic control, especially regarding Donlee Drive. A woman said she saw more than 17 cars lined up trying to get to South Tech Ridge Drive. She was also worried about the children playing in this street.

Tech Ridge Open House scene at Vasion Gymnasium, St. George, Utah September 21, 2021 | Photo by David Dudley, St. George News

“Can we have speed bumps? The woman asked.

“It’s up to town,” said Barlow, smiling. “But we are working to alleviate that pressure. We have new roads under construction to access Tech Ridge from the southwest and southeast corners of the mesa.

Southwest, Cloud Drive is 60 to 90 days from completion. The Southeast Corridor has yet to be named – Barlow and his company are open to suggestions – but it should be finished in about two years, which, Barlow added, will be right when the larger buildings are expected to be. completed.

St. George City Councilor Vardell Curtis, who spent a year on the St. George Town Planning Commission, said the community’s concerns were legitimate.

“Traffic will be a challenge,” Curtis told St. George News, “especially if we’re currently stranded on Tech Ridge Drive, before growth really kicks in.”

But, said Curtis, Barlow and his company seem well prepared for the challenge. Likewise, former St. George’s Mayor Dan McArthur has expressed concerns about how the resulting growth and traffic will affect the quality of life in St. George.

Zonos Chief of Staff Joshua Aikens speaks to residents at Tech Ridge Open House, St. George, Utah September 21, 2021 | Photo by David Dudley, St. George News

“We have to take into account the concerns of longtime residents,” McArthur told St. George News. “There are times when you feel like growth comes first. But we only have one chance to get it right.

At the open house, Barlow assured the audience that he and his team were aware of their concerns.

“We have hired the best planners in the business,” Barlow told the audience in a calm and even voice. “They are town planners who specialize in town planning, which is really about building pedestrian facilities. Places where people will want to work, play and live.

Barlow said this was the guiding principle of Tech Ridge’s main planned community. While the plan has grown significantly since its introduction in 2017, the potential rewards may be commensurate with the growth, Barlow said.

In 2017, Barlow and the company predicted that the development of Tech Ridge would create 3,807 jobs, requiring 873 multi-family units and 196 single-family homes. Now the group says it expects to create 4,876 jobs, which requires 2,200 multi-family units and 200 single-family homes. The community will also feature storefronts, hotels and recreation areas.

This infrastructure is intended to support the growth in the value of jobs, which Barlow and the company plan to grow from $ 216 million in 2017 to $ 393 million in 2021.

Currently, four tech companies have signed up to work on Tech Ridge. They include Vasion, Zonos, busybusy, and Intergalactic. Each company recruits and seeks to develop.

For example, Vasion currently has 211 employees and is expected to have 366 by 2023. Zonos has 95 employees and expects to have 227 by 2023, which, again, begs the question of whether it there is enough water to go around.

Barlow said at the open house that the majority of Tech Ridge’s housing will be multi-family units, which use half of the water used by single-family residences. The 2,200 multi-family homes will use the same amount of water as 1,100 single-family homes in the region.

“We have been, and will continue to be, very careful about our use of water,” said Barlow. “With our housing plan, we are tackling water use as well as traffic issues.

That is, by having the majority of Tech Ridge employees living on Tech Ridge, the project seeks to alleviate the rush of traffic that begins and ends every day, Barlow said.

“We invited people to the open house in the spirit of transparency,” said Barlow. “This kind of project has never been done here before, so naturally residents will have a lot of questions and concerns.

“I’m glad we got to talk about these things,” he continued. “We want people to know that we are working on these challenges. The concerns of citizens are our concerns.

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2021, all rights reserved.


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Learn more about our featured September neighborhood, the village of Cochran’s Crossing http://sadc-tribunal.org/learn-more-about-our-featured-september-neighborhood-the-village-of-cochrans-crossing/ http://sadc-tribunal.org/learn-more-about-our-featured-september-neighborhood-the-village-of-cochrans-crossing/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 16:28:00 +0000 http://sadc-tribunal.org/learn-more-about-our-featured-september-neighborhood-the-village-of-cochrans-crossing/ Cochran’s Crossing includes amenities such as Cattail Park. (Ally Bolender / Community Impact Journal) Cochran’s Crossing is home to several golf courses and facilities such as the Shadowbend YMCA and the Bear Branch Sports Fields. It is one of the 10 villages of The Woodlands. Located in the heart of the Woodlands, Cochran’s Crossing offers […]]]>

Cochran’s Crossing includes amenities such as Cattail Park. (Ally Bolender / Community Impact Journal)

Cochran’s Crossing is home to several golf courses and facilities such as the Shadowbend YMCA and the Bear Branch Sports Fields. It is one of the 10 villages of The Woodlands.

Located in the heart of the Woodlands, Cochran’s Crossing offers quick access to the shops and restaurants of Market Street and Hughes Landing, outdoor concerts at the Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion, kayaking on Lake Woodlands and regular festivals in Town Green Park.

Median square footage: 2,784

Median home value: $ 354,970

Schools: Galatas Elementary School, David Elementary School, McCullough Jr. High School, Knox Jr. High School, Woodlands High School, Woodlands College Park High School

Houses on market: 13

Housing under contract: 34

Average days on market: 15

Median annual property taxes: $ 7,809

Median price per square foot: $ 144.32

Property taxes (in dollars):

Conroe ISD $ 1.21

Lone Star University System $ 0.11

Montgomery County $ 0.43

Montgomery County Hospital District $ 0.06

Montgomery County Municipal Utility District # 60 $ 0.17

Township of Woodlands $ 0.22

Total (per $ 100 of assessment) $ 2.20

Information provided by Jack Allen III, Allen Associate Broker | Sims Real Estate Group. The information was provided on September 3.


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Duggan touts director of planning, neighborhood development at Mackinac conference http://sadc-tribunal.org/duggan-touts-director-of-planning-neighborhood-development-at-mackinac-conference/ http://sadc-tribunal.org/duggan-touts-director-of-planning-neighborhood-development-at-mackinac-conference/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 22:18:45 +0000 http://sadc-tribunal.org/duggan-touts-director-of-planning-neighborhood-development-at-mackinac-conference/ Mackinac Island – Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan discussed side lot sales, connecting riverside residents and revitalizing city neighborhoods in a keynote address Tuesday at the Mackinac Policy Conference. After a 28-month hiatus, the conference resumed this week with the theme of “reimagining a healthy Michigan” at the Island’s Grand Hotel with fewer attendees and strict […]]]>

Mackinac Island – Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan discussed side lot sales, connecting riverside residents and revitalizing city neighborhoods in a keynote address Tuesday at the Mackinac Policy Conference.

After a 28-month hiatus, the conference resumed this week with the theme of “reimagining a healthy Michigan” at the Island’s Grand Hotel with fewer attendees and strict protocols.

Duggan, during an hour-long conversation by the fireside in the hotel’s grand theater, provided an update on the development of the neighborhood and introduced Antoine Bryant, recently appointed director of the planning and development department of Detroit.

Bryant said he grew up in the Brooklyn projects and was inspired by his surroundings because it was “abundantly clear that my family, friends and neighborhoods were never a part of the planning process.”

This led him to pursue studies in architecture and design, and then he got deeply into community development similar to the one where he grew up.

“I always wanted to give back and had my eye on Detroit for quite some time,” said Bryant after joining Duggan on stage.



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Calendar of events Around the neighborhood on September 22, 2021 | Cheyenne Edition http://sadc-tribunal.org/calendar-of-events-around-the-neighborhood-on-september-22-2021-cheyenne-edition/ http://sadc-tribunal.org/calendar-of-events-around-the-neighborhood-on-september-22-2021-cheyenne-edition/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 06:00:00 +0000 http://sadc-tribunal.org/calendar-of-events-around-the-neighborhood-on-september-22-2021-cheyenne-edition/ THURSDAY Southern Colorado Women’s House Sunset Meet & Greet – 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Partners in Housing, 455 Gold Pass Heights, $ 15 to $ 20. Registration required: tinyurl.com/4eparysm. Pie in the Jar Cooking Class – 6-8 p.m., Gather Food Studio, 2011 W. Colorado Ave., $ 60. Registration required: Collectfoodstudio.com. George Whitesell – 7 […]]]>

THURSDAY

Southern Colorado Women’s House Sunset Meet & Greet – 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Partners in Housing, 455 Gold Pass Heights, $ 15 to $ 20. Registration required: tinyurl.com/4eparysm.

Pie in the Jar Cooking Class – 6-8 p.m., Gather Food Studio, 2011 W. Colorado Ave., $ 60. Registration required: Collectfoodstudio.com.

George Whitesell – 7 p.m., Red Gravy, 23 S. Tejon St .; redgravyco.com/blue-at-red-gravy-2.

FRIDAY

Apple Strudel Cooking Class – 1 to 4 p.m., Gather Food Studio, 2011 Avenue W. Colorado, $ 65. Registration required: Collectfoodstudio.com.

Dead Man Brewfest – 6 p.m., Weidner Field, 111 W. Cimarron St., $ 35. Tickets required: switchbacksfc.com/entertainment.

Illegal cheese – 6-8 p.m., Buffalo Lodge Bicycle Resort, 2 El Paso Blvd .; bikeresort.com.

Hope never ends – Benefiting Homeward Pikes Peak, 6 to 9 p.m., Gold Hill Mesa, 142 W. Raven Mine Drive., Suite 200, $ 100. Registration required: homewardpp.org.

Joe Johnson – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Front Range Barbecue, 2330 W. Colorado Ave., $ 5; frbbq.com.

Bill Snyder – 7-10 p.m., Red Gravy, 23 S. Tejon St .; redgravyco.com/blue-at-red-gravy-2.

Kyle Cervantes – 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $ 5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

FRIDAY SATURDAY

April Macie – 7:30 p.m. and 9:45 p.m., 3E’s Comedy Club, 1 S. Nevada Ave., $ 25- $ 75. Tickets required: 3escomedy.com.

SATURDAY

Geological hike with Jay Temple – 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Garden of the Gods Nature and Visitors Center, 1805 N. 30th St., $ 5. Registration required: tinyurl.com/m6hwrktd.

COS @ 150 Historical walk – 10 to 11:30 a.m., Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum, 215 S. Tejon St., $ 5. Registration required: cspm.org/cos150stroll.

Fall Harvest Festival – 10 am-2 pm, McAllister House Museum, 423 N. Cascade Ave .; 635-7925, emcallister.curator@gmail.com.

History detectives: Green spaces – For upper elementary students, 10:15 a.m. – 11 a.m. Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum, 215 S. Tejon St. Registration required: give.cspm.org/history-detectives.

Aspens on the avenue – With hundreds of artists, 10 am-4pm, West Colorado Avenue, between 23rd and 27th streets; shopoldcoloradocity.com/events.

Pikes Peak Area Voters League Education Discussion – Civic Education: Is Critical Race Theory a Factor? 1 p.m., KCH MacLaren Hall at Knights of Columbus Hall, Penrose Library, 20 W. Pikes Peak Ave .; lwvppr.org.

6035 – 4 pm-7pm, Gold Hill Mesa, 142 S. Raven Mine Drive; amusiccompanyinc.com.

Where the wild things are dinner – Benefiting the Early Connections Learning Center, 5:00 p.m., Historic Day Nursery, 104 E. Rio Grande St., $ 150. Reservations required: earlyconnections.org/wildthings.

Fundraising dance for the Noche De Baile scholarship – For the benefit of underserved and underrepresented students wishing to pursue graduate studies, 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., Westside Eagles, 1050 S. 21st St., $ 20 in advance, $ 30 at the door. Tickets: elcincodemayo.org.

Dave Arvizo – 7-10 p.m., Red Gravy, 23 S. Tejon St .; redgravyco.com/blue-at-red-gravy-2.

Boyd Sweeney – 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $ 5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

SUNDAY

David Spade – 8 p.m., Pikes Peak Center, 190 S. Cascade Ave., $ 39 and up. Tickets required: pikespeakcenter.com.

TUESDAY

Hispanic Room Business Lunch on Hispanic Heritage – 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Cheyenne Mountain Resort, 3225 Broadmoor Valley Road, $ 30 and up. Registration required: cosconcilio.com.

African Curry # 9 – Online Cooking Class in Kenya – Organized by Gather Food Studio, 6 to 7:30 p.m., $ 25. Registration required: Collectfoodstudio.com.

SEVEN. 29

Hiking and motorless bikes for early risers – 5-8 am, Garden of the Gods Park, 1805 N. 30th St. Skateboards and longboards are not permitted; coloradosprings.gov/hikeandbike.

Coffee Cake Cooking Class – 11 am-1pm, Gather Food Studio, 2011 W. Colorado Ave., $ 50. Registration required: Collectfoodstudio.com.

County of Wyde – 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., Front Range Barbecue, 2330 W. Colorado Ave., $ 5; frbbq.com.

UNTIL FRIDAY

Meditation in the garden – 7:30 to 9:00 a.m., Garden of the Gods Nature and Visitors Center, 1805 N. 30th St., $ 10. Registration required: gardenofgods.com/things-to-do/things-1/calendar.

UNTIL SATURDAY

“Cabaret under the stars” – 7:30 p.m. Friday to Saturday, Millibo Art Theater, outdoor stage, 1626 S. Tejon St., $ 28. Tickets required: theme.org.

UNTIL SEPT. 30

Exhibition of members of the Pastel Society and 10th annual exhibition of miniatures and small works – Academy Art & Frame Co., 7560 N. Academy Blvd; academyframesco.com.

works by Dale Pittock and Don Orr – Arati Artist Gallery, 2425 W. Colorado Ave .; aratiartistsgallery.com.

UNTIL OCT. 2

“Moon over Buffalo” – Funky Little Theater Co., Westside Community Center, 1628 W. Bijou St., $ 15- $ 19; funkylittletheater.org.

UNTIL OCT. 31

Exhibition “The Aspen Show” – Laura Reilly Fine Art Gallery and Studio, 2522-A W. Colorado Ave .; laurareilly.com.

UNTIL APRIL 17

Brett Weston: “Working towards abstraction” – Colorado Springs Art Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $ 5 to $ 10. Tickets required: fac.coloradocollege.edu/theatre-events/la-cage-aux-folles.

IN PROGRESS

WEDNESDAY

it Rude Blues Jam – With house band and open mic, 7 p.m., The Gold Room, 18 S. Nevada Ave. Tickets required: goldroomlive.com.

SATURDAYS

Colorado Springs Pioneer Museum Guided Tours – 11-11: 45am, 215 S. Tejon St. Registration required: cspm.org/events.

To list an event taking place in zip codes 80903, 80904, 80905, or 80906, send the information at least two weeks in advance by email to calendar@pikespeaknewspapers.com. For citywide events, visit coloradosprings.com.


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Tell an Upper East Side board of directors what the neighborhood needs most http://sadc-tribunal.org/tell-an-upper-east-side-board-of-directors-what-the-neighborhood-needs-most/ http://sadc-tribunal.org/tell-an-upper-east-side-board-of-directors-what-the-neighborhood-needs-most/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 18:58:28 +0000 http://sadc-tribunal.org/tell-an-upper-east-side-board-of-directors-what-the-neighborhood-needs-most/ UPPER EAST SIDE, NY – For the first time, an Upper East Side community council is giving neighbors the chance to shape one of its most important jobs: telling the city what the neighborhood needs most in the annual budget. Community Board 8 is preparing to write its District Statement of Needs for Fiscal Year […]]]>

UPPER EAST SIDE, NY – For the first time, an Upper East Side community council is giving neighbors the chance to shape one of its most important jobs: telling the city what the neighborhood needs most in the annual budget.

Community Board 8 is preparing to write its District Statement of Needs for Fiscal Year 2023: a document that outlines the district’s top three issues and specific projects that could use city funding.

Now, the board is asking Upper East Siders to complete a survey by 6:00 p.m. Tuesday to help inform CB8’s budget committee, whose members will meet at 6:30 p.m. to begin shaping the list.

Statements in recent years have had an influence, according to CB8 chairman Russell Squire, who pointed to earlier calls by the board to repair the East River Esplanade.

“Earlier this year we got funding for this, which was very much needed and a very welcome development,” Squire told Patch.

Local officials celebrated in June after the city pledged $ 80 million in repairs to the East River Esplanade. Community Council 8 had requested the city to fund repairs in its annual District Needs Statements. (Office of U.S. Representative Carolyn Maloney)

In recent years, for its three most pressing issues, the council has consistently chosen affordable housing, open spaces and the need for more school spaces. That top three list could change this year, based on public comment.

The district’s next statement of needs will be finalized this winter and will take effect in October 2022.

The council’s previous statement, for fiscal 2022, was completed in February and will go into effect in a few days. Its budget requests included money for new elementary, middle and high schools on the Upper East Side; the addition of traffic control officers and school crossing guards in the neighborhood; construction of an accessible ramp to the Yorkville branch library; and the installation of “rat-proof” bins in the neighborhood.

Take the Community Board 8 Fiscal Year 2023 District Needs Statement survey here, and view past years’ statements here.


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Rental home project underway in booming West Dallas neighborhood http://sadc-tribunal.org/rental-home-project-underway-in-booming-west-dallas-neighborhood/ http://sadc-tribunal.org/rental-home-project-underway-in-booming-west-dallas-neighborhood/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 10:51:02 +0000 http://sadc-tribunal.org/rental-home-project-underway-in-booming-west-dallas-neighborhood/ The booming West Dallas neighborhood receives another residential project. Dallas-based Larkspur Capital purchased land on Fort Worth Avenue for the 146-unit townhouse rental project. The 8.5-acre development will be across from the iconic Belmont Hotel. “As we look to take advantage of the growth of the Fort Worth Avenue micro-market, we are also on the […]]]>

The booming West Dallas neighborhood receives another residential project.

Dallas-based Larkspur Capital purchased land on Fort Worth Avenue for the 146-unit townhouse rental project.

The 8.5-acre development will be across from the iconic Belmont Hotel.

“As we look to take advantage of the growth of the Fort Worth Avenue micro-market, we are also on the corner of Trinity Groves and Bishop Arts and have direct access to downtown,” said Carl Anderson of Larkspur Capital. “While most single-family and built-for-rental rental projects have been concentrated in suburban areas, we take an urban angle given the level of tenant demand associated with the high barriers to entry for building this type of property. produced in the urban core. sub-markets.

“Obviously it’s not easy to assemble this amount of land in the middle of town, but we’ve been able to do it here and at a few other sites in our pipeline. “

Anderson said the Fort Worth Avenue rental housing project will focus on green space; hiking trails, dog trails and pocket parks planned throughout the property. The new community will also have a club house and a swimming pool.

“The units have their own yards and garages, which we have seen earns a considerable rent premium over traditional multi-family dwellings,” Anderson said. “The average 1,600 square foot unit size is much larger than a typical apartment and responds to the growing market for full-size rental products, which has only been exacerbated by the sharp appreciation in home prices and the shortage of dwellings that we know of. “

JHP Architects designed the new development and Garthoff Design is the landscape architect. OHT Partners LLC (formerly Oden Hughes) is the general contractor for the project.

And Veritex Community Bank is providing funding for the project. Jones Lang LaSalle’s Clint Coe and Will Mogk organized the share capital.

J. Scott Lake and Jake Milner of Davidson & Bogel Real Estate negotiated the sale of the land with Lane Kommer of Henry S Miller Brokerage.

Larkspur Capital has a proven track record of building urban housing projects in East Dallas and more recently in Oak Cliff.

The developer also announced plans for a 200-unit apartment project in the Dallas Deep Ellum neighborhood last year.

The Fort Worth Avenue project is just the latest in a series of recent developments along the thoroughfare west of downtown Dallas.

StoryBuilt Homes is working on a 12-acre mixed-use project with housing and commercial space on Fort Worth Avenue and Commerce Street.


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Neighborhood Council connects the North End http://sadc-tribunal.org/neighborhood-council-connects-the-north-end/ http://sadc-tribunal.org/neighborhood-council-connects-the-north-end/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 21:41:41 +0000 http://sadc-tribunal.org/neighborhood-council-connects-the-north-end/ For the North End Neighborhood Council, keeping residents connected and informed is the council’s highest priority. The issues that the board strives to address and in which it engages are certainly important, but without a network of communication with those directly affected by these issues, the impact of the board would be hampered by the […]]]>

For the North End Neighborhood Council, keeping residents connected and informed is the council’s highest priority. The issues that the board strives to address and in which it engages are certainly important, but without a network of communication with those directly affected by these issues, the impact of the board would be hampered by the lack of involvement. of the very people who live there.

“All the problems come and go, but the connectivity will always be there and it’s by far the most important thing we do for the neighborhood,” said Kyle Price, chairman of the North End Ward Council. “When everyone’s connected, we can navigate all kinds of things together and at least know what’s going on.

While average citizens can sometimes find themselves having to work through layers of municipal government to meet their needs, the Northern Council is there as a bridge. Price said the council’s relationship with city staff and leaders is excellent, another aspect of the council’s value to North End residents.

“It looks like a big city sometimes, but Tacoma is not really a big city and the neighborhood councils help to make that point. We give people a voice. It’s quite empowering as a citizen to know. that your voice is part of the process that is happening in the area where you live.

The North End is generally defined as being east of Orchard Street, north of 6e Avenue, and west of the Stadium business district. This also includes the Proctor Quarter and the Old Town, the city’s birthplace.

Due to the pandemic, the council had to meet virtually on Zoom and some of its projects were blocked but not forgotten. One of them is the Cushman-Adams electrical substation on North 21st Street. Tacoma’s utilities no longer require the use of the historic mid-1920s building or the grand yard it sits on, so North End Council is considering the property’s future use as a community center and park space called “Cushman Commons”.

“It’s an amazing building with a really cool history,” Price said. “We would love to have a community center in the North End because the only ones we have are at the University of Puget Sound and it’s a private campus. There is no public meeting space in the North End. that is inside.

Before the pandemic, the council held a block party at the substation that benefited a large number of people in attendance, and TPU arranged for a consultant to do feasibility studies and talk to neighborhood residents about this. that they would like to see done with the property. However, everything was put on hold once COVID hit and TPU had to resume using the property to meet pandemic distancing requirements.

“We were going to have meetings and disseminate information and that’s when the pandemic started. We couldn’t have public meetings to communicate with people and see what they wished to have in this space, so it’s on hold, ”Price said, noting that it will pick up as things return to a more normal state.

Another issue the council is monitoring is the city’s Home in Tacoma project which seeks to change Tacoma’s housing growth strategy, policies and programs to increase housing supply and affordability. The project is not without causing controversy and concern among residents of the city.

“We’re worried they’ll change the zoning, which will give developers quarters and you won’t achieve any of the political goals you’re hoping for,” Price said. “The zoning tool the city uses to achieve this, other cities have used this tool and haven’t met any of the goals of getting better and more affordable housing. You could get more housing but not more housing. affordable housing and this ends up being problematic for neighborhoods This has been true in other cities where similar zoning has occurred.

Price said the council had tried to encourage small pilot programs to help the city understand what policies might work instead of embarking on massive zoning changes without a real plan on how those changes will actually help the city.

“We tried to move the ball in a positive direction because the only policy we have right now to get there is hope and hope is terrible policy.”

Despite the pandemic roadblocks, the North End Neighborhood Council has continued to focus on being a communication hub for the North End and also for people who do not live there but want to keep abreast of it. happening in their city in general. To date, the council has a mailing list of approximately 1,500 people and its Facebook page (Facebook.com/NENCTacoma) has approximately 2,500 subscribers.

“Our dissemination of information is more immediate and more extensive than what the city is going to provide,” said Price. “The best place for people to log in and start familiarizing themselves with what’s going on is to go to our website (NENC.org), follow us on Facebook and subscribe to our mailing list.

The council meets almost every first Monday of the month at 6 p.m. Visit their Facebook page to participate and learn more.


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Foundation donates $ 100,000 to support affordable housing in the St. Louis neighborhood http://sadc-tribunal.org/foundation-donates-100000-to-support-affordable-housing-in-the-st-louis-neighborhood/ http://sadc-tribunal.org/foundation-donates-100000-to-support-affordable-housing-in-the-st-louis-neighborhood/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 00:12:03 +0000 http://sadc-tribunal.org/foundation-donates-100000-to-support-affordable-housing-in-the-st-louis-neighborhood/ ST. LOUIS – A total of $ 100,000 is the amount the Regions Foundation gives in grants to support homeownership in the Hyde Park neighborhood. “Affordable housing and living the American dream through home ownership is one of the founding principles of the founding of the Urban League 111 years ago. and to this day. […]]]>

ST. LOUIS – A total of $ 100,000 is the amount the Regions Foundation gives in grants to support homeownership in the Hyde Park neighborhood.

“Affordable housing and living the American dream through home ownership is one of the founding principles of the founding of the Urban League 111 years ago. and to this day. And so part of that is not just homeownership, but also helping people stay in housing, ”said Michael McMillan, President and CEO of Urban League Metropolitan St. Louis. .

With down payment assistance for first-time home buyers, this newly remodeled home at 4433 Randall Place can be yours.

“This is what we need to do in every part of our community, and that is to rebuild it and reinvest in our community,” said Senator Karla May, (D) Missouri.

The two-bedroom, two-story house is ready to buy.

“The foundation’s goal is to build stronger and more inclusive communities,” said Scott Hartwig, market manager for Regions Bank St. Louis.

“We all know that access to affordable, quality housing affects all communities across the country. “

The grant supports a community partnership between the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, Inc. and Dream Builders 4 Equity.

It also gives young participants in the Dream Builders program the opportunity to work and earn money. Proceeds from home sales are reinvested in the student college program and fund.

“We congratulate you on what you have all done. I watch you every day on social media and see these young people developing incredible talents and skills, ”said McMillan.

“And we look forward to transforming North St. Louis one community at a time.

Over a five-year period, Dream Builders estimates that it will serve 250 young people involved in its program and support 25 new owner families.

“No one, person or child, should have to walk the streets and see infrastructure crumble,” May said.

The home construction project is expected to generate $ 4 million in revenue for minority contractors and $ 1.6 million in construction labor wages.


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It’s reunion weekend in the Russell neighborhood of Louisville – 89.3 WFPL News Louisville http://sadc-tribunal.org/its-reunion-weekend-in-the-russell-neighborhood-of-louisville-89-3-wfpl-news-louisville/ http://sadc-tribunal.org/its-reunion-weekend-in-the-russell-neighborhood-of-louisville-89-3-wfpl-news-louisville/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 09:57:42 +0000 http://sadc-tribunal.org/its-reunion-weekend-in-the-russell-neighborhood-of-louisville-89-3-wfpl-news-louisville/ It’s reunion weekend in the Russell neighborhood of Louisville. Russell: A Place of Promise, a development project carried out in partnership with the city, is organizing a series of events to commemorate the neighborhood and its residents. They include educational, faith-based, and networking opportunities for black business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs. One of the planners […]]]>

It’s reunion weekend in the Russell neighborhood of Louisville.

Russell: A Place of Promise, a development project carried out in partnership with the city, is organizing a series of events to commemorate the neighborhood and its residents. They include educational, faith-based, and networking opportunities for black business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs.

One of the planners is Cassandra Webb, research director at the non-profit organization Cities United. She said Russell’s Homecoming Events aim to instill pride and belonging in past and current residents, much like coming home to college or high school.

“It’s so much about a community, about coming home… coming back and saying ‘I’m going to invest financially’, or ‘I’m going to volunteer’, or ‘I’m going to be a mentor’ or ” I’m going to support the neighborhood to some extent, ”Webb said.

Russell, in the city’s West End, was once considered the Harlem of the South. He was known for his booming black-owned businesses and commercial strip along what is now Muhammad Ali Boulevard. It also houses the West Branch Library the country’s first fully-managed public library serving black residents.

Due to racist policies like redness, the Federal Law on Interstate Highways 1956 and the targeted gentrification efforts that persist today, the once flourishing domain was no longer in the 1960s, just like other predominantly black neighborhoods across the country.

Russell: a place of promise has the declared mission of creating wealth in the neighborhood through home ownership and workforce development, without moving its residents.

“For years black people, especially those who have lived in the West End, have been excluded from decision making,” said Webb. “That’s why it’s so important, especially when we’re talking about dollars coming into the neighborhood, that these are led by the residents and that they own the place where these investments occur. “

Webb’s colleague Daphne Walker added that meaningful engagement is the key to effective change that truly benefits the community and its members.

“When you start the process of centering residents, it is passed down from generation to generation and begins to create a sense of belonging to the neighborhood, a sense of stability – which is very important for success in life,” Walker said. .

But social justice advocates at the Root Cause Research Center argue getting residents to the table is not enough. Instead, they would like to see the group invest money directly into the community so residents can create tools that help them stay in the neighborhood. Tools like a land trust – a measure that would allow residents to monitor changes in their community. It would also stabilize the affordability of housing.


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People in Your Neighborhood: Vicki Reed Pursues Her Passion for Giving Through The Parker Foundation http://sadc-tribunal.org/people-in-your-neighborhood-vicki-reed-pursues-her-passion-for-giving-through-the-parker-foundation/ http://sadc-tribunal.org/people-in-your-neighborhood-vicki-reed-pursues-her-passion-for-giving-through-the-parker-foundation/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 22:43:32 +0000 http://sadc-tribunal.org/people-in-your-neighborhood-vicki-reed-pursues-her-passion-for-giving-through-the-parker-foundation/ As a non-profit association Parker Foundation Celebrating 50 Years of Contributing to Other Nonprofits, La Jollan Vicki Reed, one of its board members, said the foundation and the organizations it supports “are constantly evolving.” Reed, a resident of La Jolla since 1986, joined the Parker Foundation board in 2016. The Carlsbad-based foundation, established in 1971, […]]]>

As a non-profit association Parker Foundation Celebrating 50 Years of Contributing to Other Nonprofits, La Jollan Vicki Reed, one of its board members, said the foundation and the organizations it supports “are constantly evolving.”

Reed, a resident of La Jolla since 1986, joined the Parker Foundation board in 2016.

The Carlsbad-based foundation, established in 1971, is named after Gerald Parker and Inez Grant Parker, who have supported local organizations such as the San Diego Museum of Art, the Boy Scouts, and the Northwest Family YMCA. The foundation was established with donations from Inez after Gerald’s death.

Since its inception, the foundation has awarded more than $ 56 million in grants to more than 750 organizations, including the Athenaeum Music and Art Library of La Jolla, the Historical Society of La Jolla, La Jolla Symphony & Chorus and La Jolla Playhouse.

Reed said organizations in San Diego County can apply for grants from the Parker Foundation, which meets six times a year to review applications.

When the board agrees to fund an organization, “it’s pretty quick. … They receive their funds within two weeks, ”she said.

Although the organizations Parker funded have largely been linked to the arts, Reed said the foundation supports “everyone … from health education.”

Reed was a member of the San Diego Arts and Culture Commission from 2008 to 2013 and served as its chair for the last three years of her tenure.

She said the breadth of organizations the Parker Foundation supports drew her to its board.

“I was intrigued by the idea of ​​being able to help various organizations across the county,” she said.

Her advocacy on the arts commission led her to learn about many different organizations, she said.

Since joining the foundation’s board of directors, Reed said, she has been passionate about efforts to support homeless people in the San Diego area.

“[Homelessness] is a complicated question. All this money is spent on it… and yet it still seems to be a growing problem. “

Vicki Roseau

She came to “understand the need for the homeless to be their own advocates,” she said. “They need to be understood.”

Reed is now Parker’s representative for Donors together to end homelessness, a network of organizations working together to find solutions to homelessness.

“It has been a big change in my life,” she said. “[Homelessness] is a complicated question. All this money is spent on it… and yet it still seems to be a growing problem. “

But she said “I’m really optimistic” about the network’s efforts.

Reed said she was pleasantly surprised by the number of organizations that got “creative during COVID and looked to these major changes that were happening.”

“They had to do an about-face,” she said. “They had to find ways to feed the many people who had food problems. They had to find housing for the homeless.

Reed said “it’s really kind of a goal of the [Parker] board of directors to encourage others to set up private foundations and work towards the same goal of giving back to the community.

“We only have so many funds [and] we can do a lot with these funds. But it would be just wonderful if other people could also participate in the same way, ”she added.

In addition to financial support, local nonprofits need “a board of directors and staff who are interested in really working with the community and understanding what the needs of the community are and just being prepared.” to help, ”Reed said.

“I am always delighted, after funding an organization, to read its final report and see what it was able to do with the money. “

Reed said she will continue her work with the foundation, as well as serving as chair of the NTC Foundation’s Art in Public Places committee at Liberty Station in Point Loma.

“I love my job at the Parker Foundation,” she said. “I love it because I got to know San Diego County in a way that everyone really needs to know and understand.

“I love this community.

People in Your Neighborhood highlights notable locals we all want to know more about. If you know someone you would like us to profile, email robert.vardon@lajollalight.com. ??


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