Neighborhood – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 20:52:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sadc-tribunal.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/favicon-1.png Neighborhood – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ 32 32 LifeBUILDER’S helps reclaim the neighborhood https://sadc-tribunal.org/lifebuilders-helps-reclaim-the-neighborhood/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 20:08:20 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/lifebuilders-helps-reclaim-the-neighborhood/ SOUTHFIELD, Mich. (CW50) For nearly two decades, Larry Johnson and his wife Marilyn have helped reclaim the neighborhood, rebuild the community and empower young people in Detroit’s G7 neighborhood. “We exist to restore dignity and bring hope to the people of Regent Park,” says Johnson. The Johnsons launched LifeBILDERS with the purchase of a building […]]]>

SOUTHFIELD, Mich. (CW50) For nearly two decades, Larry Johnson and his wife Marilyn have helped reclaim the neighborhood, rebuild the community and empower young people in Detroit’s G7 neighborhood. “We exist to restore dignity and bring hope to the people of Regent Park,” says Johnson.

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The Johnsons launched LifeBILDERS with the purchase of a building and from there the work began. They have helped restore homes and provide support to the community. “There was a lack of public services. We were dealing with political corruption, the biggest municipal bankruptcy in history, and corporate bankruptcies that happened,” Johnson said.

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Through hard work and dedication, LifeBUILDERS has helped restore and rehabilitate more than eighty-five homes and Johnson says “people either move in to rent or buy homes to build wealth for themselves”. They also built an early childhood education center a few years ago as part of Michigan State’s Early Childhood Education Program, restored abandoned parks and reclaimed parks, so children have places to play. “We have brought a new housing standard to the community.”

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For more information about LifeBUILDERS, visit lifebuildersdetroit.com.

look Community Connection, Saturday at 7 a.m. on CW50

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Neighborhood on the northeast side named Last Elevator Zone https://sadc-tribunal.org/neighborhood-on-the-northeast-side-named-last-elevator-zone/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 23:52:24 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/neighborhood-on-the-northeast-side-named-last-elevator-zone/ The elevator announcement took place at the new Cook/Goodwill facility on 38th Street (Jill Sheridan WFYI) The next Indianapolis community to be designated as a Lift Indy neighborhood is named. The East 38th Street corridor on the northeast side of town is Lift Indy’s eighth precinct. The $3.5 million investment announcement builds on previous […]]]>

The elevator announcement took place at the new Cook/Goodwill facility on 38th Street (Jill Sheridan WFYI)

The elevator announcement took place at the new Cook/Goodwill facility on 38th Street (Jill Sheridan WFYI)

The next Indianapolis community to be designated as a Lift Indy neighborhood is named. The East 38th Street corridor on the northeast side of town is Lift Indy’s eighth precinct.

The $3.5 million investment announcement builds on previous development in the area led by Cook Medical, nonprofit groups and the city.

The Department of Metropolitan Development will use federal development and housing grants to invest in the area. DMD director Scarlett Andrews said the aim was to build on recent successes.

“They need an additional infusion of additional affordable homeownership and rental opportunities and additional investment in small businesses to really push them to the next level as a community,” Andrews said.

DMD will distribute federal development and housing grants for new homes, an affordable apartment complex, mortgage programs, microenterprise loans and park improvements.

This is the District (D) of Indianapolis Councilman Keith Graves. He said years of divestment have created disparities for Indianapolis residents.

“So this investment by Lift Indy will revitalize this East 38th Street corridor and create opportunities for residents to overcome social and economic barriers and this investment will dismantle the zip code divide,” Grave said.

The collaborative neighborhood revitalization effort was championed by Ashley Gurvitz, CEO of United Northeast Community Development Corporation. She said the engagement of the private and public sectors has made a difference.

“They stuck with us to see that community development can be done with community and done well with community and I can’t stress that enough,” Gurvitz said.

Other LIft neighborhoods include Old Southside, Far Eastside, and Martindale-Brightwood.


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Mini mixed-use development planned for Third Street Historic District https://sadc-tribunal.org/mini-mixed-use-development-planned-for-third-street-historic-district/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 05:00:36 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/mini-mixed-use-development-planned-for-third-street-historic-district/ The project would include two apartments with a market By Dolores Quintana Redcar Properties has plans for a parking lot near the Santa Monica beach, as reported by Urbanize Los Angeles, and the project was submitted to the Santa Monica Planning Commission on Nov. 2 for review. Redcard Properties already owns the site at 2668 […]]]>

The project would include two apartments with a market

By Dolores Quintana

Redcar Properties has plans for a parking lot near the Santa Monica beach, as reported by Urbanize Los Angeles, and the project was submitted to the Santa Monica Planning Commission on Nov. 2 for review. Redcard Properties already owns the site at 2668 2nd Street.

The plan is to build a two-story building with two housing units and a 738 neighborhood market on the ground floor with seven basement parking spaces in a single-storey parking area. Kevin Daly Architects is the official designer and the project would consist of a two bedroom apartment and a two story townhouse with three bedrooms which would be located above the market. The exterior of the building would be clad in wood and there would be a small courtyard outside.

This site is part of the Third Street Historic District, which makes the approval process a bit more difficult. The Historic Resources Group report approved the building’s more modern design according to Urbanize Los Angeles as meeting local and federal requirements for new buildings in historic districts and the Santa Monica Landmarks Commission, which has already approved the design.

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Mayor’s office releases details of sanctioned campsite in Zoom call with neighborhood leaders https://sadc-tribunal.org/mayors-office-releases-details-of-sanctioned-campsite-in-zoom-call-with-neighborhood-leaders/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 01:31:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/mayors-office-releases-details-of-sanctioned-campsite-in-zoom-call-with-neighborhood-leaders/ Assistant Mayor Sam Adams spoke Thursday afternoon to a group of neighborhood association representatives and other Portland residents about Mayor Ted Wheeler’s plan to build six massive sanctioned campsites across the city ​​with up to 250 capacity each while phasing out curbside camping. Adams provided notable details about the city’s vision that have yet to […]]]>

Assistant Mayor Sam Adams spoke Thursday afternoon to a group of neighborhood association representatives and other Portland residents about Mayor Ted Wheeler’s plan to build six massive sanctioned campsites across the city ​​with up to 250 capacity each while phasing out curbside camping.

Adams provided notable details about the city’s vision that have yet to be released. They branded some participants as nobles and others as militarists.

The image that has emerged is of tightly guarded camps with 24-hour security, one-entry weapons checks, no drug or alcohol use in common areas, two meals provided to campers per day , no fires and a 15-to -1 resident/staff ratio.

In what will likely be a particularly contentious point in an already heated discussion about campsites, Adams said the camps won’t be “anonymous”: The city aims to maintain a database of campers’ names and birthdates.

Adams hopes services in the camps will include two meals a day, a daily “heavy snack”, shelter navigation and basic sanitation.

The plans presented by Adams today raise a number of questions and suggest internal contradictions.

The campsites are part of the mayor’s end goal to ban camping citywide. This means providing low-barrier shelter for those most affected by homelessness, addictions and mental illness. However, based on the city’s master plan today, it looks like there will be real barriers to entry: people can’t bring weapons or use drugs in common areas. Residents cannot light a fire for cooking or heating. The issue of owning a pet was not addressed.

In addition, each camper must be referred by a local worker to make it a campsite. “No dating is allowed,” Adams said, even though the camps are meant to support those who are being swept away from unauthorized camps. And campers are banned if they “pose a clear and present danger to themselves or others”.

Another objective: move the sites away from residential areas and business districts. This would seem to continue a trend of sticking shelters in low-income neighborhoods that are already burdened with economic hardship. One participant posed this question to Adams, saying he felt like his neighborhood was a “dumpsite for your problems.”

Adams was peppered with questions about camp management, a point that remains unclear. If the city partners with nonprofit providers to run the camps, Adams said, she would expect those organizations to provide some sort of security and work directly with the city on outcomes.

“Nothing against [Multnomah County], but we thought having that responsibility directly with city staff and the mayor’s office and not having the county go through,” Adams explained. “The county is doing a great job, but we believe we can better control quality by having a direct relationship with the nonprofit vendor.”

While Adams was leading the meeting, Wheeler was participating in a budget session with fellow city council members, where he was simultaneously proposing $27 million in funding to kick off the massive campsites. Adams described the request as a “down payment” to operate the venues, though he framed it by adding that additional funds would be needed from Metro, Multnomah County and the state to fund the sites and services that the city aims to provide.

None of the governments have yet pledged funding for the city plan.

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Apartment in Disputed Everett Neighborhood Historic Area https://sadc-tribunal.org/apartment-in-disputed-everett-neighborhood-historic-area/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 06:46:38 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/apartment-in-disputed-everett-neighborhood-historic-area/ By MICHAEL WHITNEYPosted on November 9, 2022 Apartment in Disputed Everett Neighborhood Historic Area Graphic by Pelletier + Schaar Architecture as submitted to City of Everett Planning A rendering of the proposed layout. EVERET — The historical commission said no. The planning director canceled and said yes.And the neighbors of a small apartment building project […]]]>


Apartment in Disputed Everett Neighborhood Historic Area


Graphic by Pelletier + Schaar Architecture as submitted to City of Everett Planning

A rendering of the proposed layout.

EVERET — The historical commission said no. The planning director canceled and said yes.
And the neighbors of a small apartment building project along the northern hillside of Grand Avenue have opposed it from the very beginning. They say approval of this project undermines why Everett has historic preservation areas meant to protect long-standing architecture and character, and erodes why people have bought homes in those historic areas. .
Now a few neighbors are considering filing an appeal, a neighbor said last week.
Planning director Yorik Stevens-Wajda has agreed to redevelop 2115 and 2117 Grand Ave. October 31.
Planning staff believe the 1925 home at 2115 Grand Ave. is too far to rehabilitate it without great expense. The house at 2117 Grand Ave. was built in 1967 and is considered too recent to be historic.
The six-plex apartment building slated to replace those two homes went through multiple design revisions and a few hours of debate by the Historical Commission to get there, Stevens-Wajda said in an interview.
Apart from the need for special permission for the roof, this project meets all other codes, he said.
“I’m definitely conscientious, every decision we make is a loose precedent,” Stevens-Wajda said.
At its last meeting on October 25, the Historical Commission clung to how the design still treats the flat roof as one large usable space.
He’s asking for a waiver to set nearly 50% of the roof — 3,042 square feet in this case — as a common space platform when the city’s maximum is 30%. The architectural drawings call it a rooftop terrace and even envision a recreational lawn and a bathroom.
The validity of a deviation is based on how the proposed design is perceived, and this opinion is based on whether the request would yield an “equivalent or better” result when compared to meeting the standard rules, in this case a roof at 30%.
The commission was disheveled. “It looks like we have rules, but if you ask for ‘a waiver’ you don’t have to follow them,” Commissioner Teresa Gemmer said.
In a 7-0-1 vote, he recommended rejecting the design due to the deflection of the roof. In an 8-0 vote that took place later, he denied giving his consent to tear down 2115 Grand Ave. as a historic house.
Stevens-Wajda wrote in his endorsement overriding their recommendation that “(the) proposed roof terrace area is intended to be integral to the design and architectural character of the building and to appear as unobtrusive as possible and well integrated into the existing structure”.
A few neighbors, however, have taken to calling it a “party deck” which gives the three-story building a de facto fourth floor.
Linda Stern, for example, pointed out how atypical roof terraces are. “There’s not a single family home or a multi-family home in Everett that has a deck like this,” she said.


Graphic by Pelletier + Schaar Architecture as submitted to City of Everett Planning

A rendering of the back of the building, facing the east driveway, with people using the roof. Parking is at this driveway.

Allowing this design sets a precedent in the city for allowing a terrace on the highest roof of a dwelling, Stern said.
“I will be able to look out the window and wave at those people on the roof,” Wilma Jones said.
It compromises neighbors’ privacy, said a person named John D., who did not post his last name during the Zoom meeting.
Stevens-Wajda reiterated last week that overall the project was up to standard.
“I know some might be disappointed with the planning director’s decision on one aspect: the roof terrace,” he said.
This raises a question for the historical curators. At the meeting, commission chair Amy Hieb said the design of this project has “a host of precedents that could unravel the historical overlays.”
Stevens-Wajda doesn’t think this endorsement sets a boilerplate precedent. If a project meets historical overlay standards and “if we had the same situation or the same set of circumstances, I think we would approve it again,” Stevens-Wajda said in an interview.
“I am aware that there are further potential developments in this historic overlay and other overlays, and we take great care” to adhere to historic regulations and codes, he said.
Cancellation of the historical commission has happened before. Retired planning director Allan Giffen canceled the commission 10 years ago regarding the redevelopment of a historic home at 1102 Grand Avenue.
An earlier prototype for the Grand 2115 and 2117 project prominently used its flat roof as a living room for the building’s residents. In 2019, Giffen denied this design as failing the test to allow deviations. He retired in 2020 after 34 years with City.
Only a small percentage of the Everett map is below a historical overlay area. The zones were formalized in 1993 and include the locations of Everett’s earliest neighborhoods: around Norton Avenue, around north Grand and Rucker Avenues overlooking Port Gardner Bay – where this project is located – and in the Riverside neighborhood.
These areas have a special rulebook. In it, he states that preservation goals should not impede new development.
Historical Commission members debated the same thing about 2115 and 2117 Grand Avenues: They don’t want to lose the historic homes, but they don’t want their role to stifle redevelopment.
Additionally, the city is undertaking a citywide update of its planning guidelines, under the trade name “Everett 2044”. Stevens-Wajda said those adjustments could include careful consideration of potential changes to historic overlays, but none are intended to disrupt the appearance of historic districts.
Of these, “I would be cautious to expand the allocation of ‘missing middle’ housing in historical overlays,” Stevens-Wajda said.
Everett’s interest in a broader mix of housing types did not influence the approval of the Grand Avenue sixplex, Stevens-Wajda said.
The developer is Capricorn Investments Inc., a company owned by the directors of Capricorn Safaris, a popular safari operator in Botswana and neighboring African countries. Capricorn Investment owners Adam and Brigitte Hedges were unavailable for an interview before press time, a paralegal at the law firm representing the company told a reporter.

Consult our publications online!

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Park Hill Golf Course could become a tree-lined neighborhood | David Heitz https://sadc-tribunal.org/park-hill-golf-course-could-become-a-tree-lined-neighborhood-david-heitz/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 17:05:20 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/park-hill-golf-course-could-become-a-tree-lined-neighborhood-david-heitz/ Park Hill Golf Course.City and County of Denver The old Park Hill golf course could become a new green neighborhood in Denver. The land use, transport and infrastructure committee will consider on Tuesday whether to approve what is called a small area plan for the golf course property. The plan guides how development would occur […]]]>

Park Hill Golf Course.City and County of Denver

The old Park Hill golf course could become a new green neighborhood in Denver.

The land use, transport and infrastructure committee will consider on Tuesday whether to approve what is called a small area plan for the golf course property. The plan guides how development would occur at the golf course. Even if the committee approves the plan, the full city council must also sign off on it.

For anything to happen at the golf course, voters would have to approve the removal of a conservation easement on the property. As part of a broad community engagement on the future of the park, only 7% of area residents wanted the green space to remain a golf course exclusively, according to the plan.

“Comments generally focused on the health and environmental benefits of parks and open spaces, and many specifically mentioned preserving existing trees and increasing the number of trees in the area,” according to the plan. “While many comments highlighted the importance of increasing open space, many others mentioned the importance of development and urged the city to consider community needs and discuss housing desires, retail business serving the community, recreational opportunities and gathering places. This desire for the site to serve as a place for future community connections was common to different viewpoints.

Owned by Westside Investment Partners

Glendale’s Westside Investment Partners purchased the site in 2019. “Since the 1980s, the non-profit Clayton Early Learning was responsible for the private 18-hole golf course it owned (operated by a third party), in a neighborhood that often lacked basic amenities such as grocery stores, transit options, and publicly accessible open spaces,” council member Chris Herndon wrote in a foreword to the plan. determined that she needed to strengthen her financial position to continue providing quality early childhood education to families in Denver. Clayton’s sale of the golf course site in 2019 sparked many ideas, conversations, debates, meetings and reports about the future of the Park Hill Golf Course.”

Help for the displaced

Residents of the area are concerned about the displacement that new developments on the site could cause. The plan calls for prioritizing affordable housing for families facing displacement by the project. “For those concerned about the involuntary relocation of long-time residents, there is affordable housing with priority for existing residents,” wrote Herndon, who represents District 8, where the golf course is located. “For those looking to remedy a long-standing food desert, the plan recommends space for grocery and fresh food choices, as well as space and support for local small businesses.”

Park amenities

The plan calls for an urban park of 70 to 80 acres comprising:

· Sports fields, courts and other active leisure facilities.

· Large or multiple playgrounds.

· A feasibility study of the field house.

· Consider water features such as a swimming pool.

· Community gathering spaces such as picnic pavilions.

· Honor the historical and cultural richness of the community.

· A climate-resilient landscape plan.

Beautification of Colorado Boulevard

The plan also calls for the creation of a western gateway for a future regional park with “significant and meaningful frontage along Colorado Boulevard” between 35th and 40th Avenues.

“Colorado Boulevard is a designated parkway that has lost its integrity as a parkway due to actions such as street widening, loss of tree canopy, and lack of a consistent building setback” , according to plan. “With the redevelopment of Park Hill Golf Course, we have the opportunity to restore the integrity of this street and envision a more modern interpretation of a promenade in the future.”

Green infrastructure

Addressing the site’s stormwater management needs “in a thoughtful and holistic manner” is also a top priority, according to the plan. The plan recommends studying the existing retention pond “to find opportunities to soften the edge of the retention pond and incorporate recreational functions and natural habitat,” the report said. “This could include green infrastructure within the right-of-way.”

What is a green infrastructure? “Examples on an urban scale could include a rain barrel against a house, a row of trees along a major city street, or the greening of an alley,” reports the Environmental Protection Agency. environment on its website. “Neighborhood-scale green infrastructure could include acres of open park space outside of a town center, planting rain gardens, or constructing a wetland near a residential complex.”

In addition to the park’s 70 to 80 acres, the neighborhood will preserve about 20 additional acres of land for green spaces, according to the plan. The site totals 155 acres.

Participation of more than 1,000 inhabitants

More than 1,000 residents gave their opinion on the small neighborhood plan. “I just feel like anything to do with removing all the trees and grass and replacing them with concrete is just problematic at this point because we live in these tiny little apartments that are locked up and locked up. already too much,” commented one resident. “And so, I feel like (the plan) has to be something that gives back to the community and also gives back to the environment.” The plan calls for preserving and expanding the neighborhood’s tree canopy by at least 20%.

Affordable Housing Components

The plan also provides affordable housing at different income levels. Many have praised the affordable housing element of the plan. “There’s not enough housing for the people living in the area, so they have to (leave),” another resident said. “And yes, they may have grown up here but can’t stay here because, like I said, houses are being built which are expensive and so they have to move because they can’t be anywhere else. .”

Support small businesses

Another commenter added, “I think not only having an affordability mix for homes, but also having an affordable price for business opportunities, because that’s one of the biggest hurdles for small business owners , is the cost of the rent.”

The small neighborhood plan also responds to this. “Historically, the Dahlia Square and Holly Square shopping centers provided affordable retail space in northeast Park Hill for local BIPOC small businesses,” according to the plan. “These commercial areas have evolved to house other community uses, leaving a void of opportunities for local small businesses to thrive in Northeast Park Hill. The new Park Hill Golf Course development is expected to meet the community’s need for spaces businesses that support local small businesses in a thriving mixed-use area.

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Charlotte neighborhood receives much-needed repairs to its homes https://sadc-tribunal.org/charlotte-neighborhood-receives-much-needed-repairs-to-its-homes/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 10:23:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/charlotte-neighborhood-receives-much-needed-repairs-to-its-homes/ Ferguson and Rebuilding Together of Greater Charlotte have come together to help provide much-needed repairs to the neighborhood. CHARLOTTE, NC — The Hidden Valley neighborhood has suffered “higher than normal levels of economic and housing disparity,” making it difficult for families to stay in their homes. Saundra Smith had moved from West Palm Beach to […]]]>

Ferguson and Rebuilding Together of Greater Charlotte have come together to help provide much-needed repairs to the neighborhood.

CHARLOTTE, NC — The Hidden Valley neighborhood has suffered “higher than normal levels of economic and housing disparity,” making it difficult for families to stay in their homes.

Saundra Smith had moved from West Palm Beach to Charlotte to care for her father. She considered the house a generational home and wanted to pass it on to her children and grandchildren.

After living there for 20 years, including the pandemic.

Maintenance became difficult, even with the help of her grandson, and she feared she would have to abandon her home and her community.

Two community organizations, Ferguson and Rebuilding Together of Greater Charlotte, have come together to help provide much-needed repairs to the Smiths’ home as well as other homes in Hidden Valley.

Organizations plan to add floor remodeling, grab bar installation, cabinet repair, and more.

They hope the repairs will give Smith “peace of mind and help him age safely in his home”.

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$45 million is coming to the Cornhill neighborhood of Utica https://sadc-tribunal.org/45-million-is-coming-to-the-cornhill-neighborhood-of-utica/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 21:46:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/45-million-is-coming-to-the-cornhill-neighborhood-of-utica/ A multi-million dollar project is coming to the Cornhill neighborhood in Utica. Forty-five million dollars will be invested in a rebirth center and an impact center. “We will give everyone the opportunity to develop their skills, to empower themselves, to empower the neighborhood, to empower our city and that is another level of what we […]]]>

A multi-million dollar project is coming to the Cornhill neighborhood in Utica. Forty-five million dollars will be invested in a rebirth center and an impact center.

“We will give everyone the opportunity to develop their skills, to empower themselves, to empower the neighborhood, to empower our city and that is another level of what we think is so important for a neighborhood,” said the mayor of ‘Utica, Robert Palmieri.

At the corner of James and Neilson streets will be the Cornhill Renaissance Center.

“On the first floor, an urban grocery store, four business incubators,” said People First executive director Bob Calli. “Where residents can test their skills and experience to see if they can in fact go into the market and earn a living with those skills.”

There will also be 36 affordable housing units on the upper floors as well as an emergency department. The second component of the Cornhill revitalization project will be the Impact Center, which will be located on West Street.

“The site we are currently on is a large four-lot site. This is the largest lot owned by a black non-profit organization in the city of Utica,” said Jawwaad Rasheed, Chairman of the Community Foundation of Herkimer and Oneida Counties.

The site is currently home to the Mid-Utica Neighborhood Preservation Corporation. The organization was formed to focus on renovation and restoration projects in Cornhill and for many years provided an adult child care program. The site is currently used for senior services and a facility for community events.

“All of the things that have historically left this neighborhood will be part of the impact center,” Rasheed said. “From banking, to doctors offices, to dentists offices, to fitness, a good sized gymnasium, commercial kitchen for events and neighborhood programs, meeting rooms, breakout rooms conference, classrooms.

The Impact Center will also provide 60 mixed-income housing units with a percentage of the units used for seniors. Rasheed says bringing these resources back to the community will help give people of color the tools they need to thrive.

“We look forward to this opportunity to open the doors of opportunity to all people of Utica, especially those of color,” Rasheed said.

Groundbreaking for the project is expected to begin in the spring of 2023.

The City of Utica has committed just over $900,000 in American Rescue Plan Act funding for this revitalization. The partners applied for state and federal grants to help with the project.

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East Harlem’s slum dodged the worst of Sandy, but the neighborhood still isn’t ready for the next storm https://sadc-tribunal.org/east-harlems-slum-dodged-the-worst-of-sandy-but-the-neighborhood-still-isnt-ready-for-the-next-storm/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 08:55:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/east-harlems-slum-dodged-the-worst-of-sandy-but-the-neighborhood-still-isnt-ready-for-the-next-storm/ The timing, wind and tides around Superstorm Sandy devastated some New York coastal communities – while sparing others a fraction of the damage that could have been. On the body of water where Long Island Sound and the East River meet — adjacent to East Harlem, Hunts Point, Soundview and other areas — the effect […]]]>

The timing, wind and tides around Superstorm Sandy devastated some New York coastal communities – while sparing others a fraction of the damage that could have been.

On the body of water where Long Island Sound and the East River meet — adjacent to East Harlem, Hunts Point, Soundview and other areas — the effect of the storm was lessened.

It was low tide there. Further south along the ocean-facing shores of Staten Island, the Rockaways and Brooklyn, Sandy hit at high tide.

“If the tide is out when a storm surge comes in, you have a lot more space where you’re used to watering before you start flooding dry land,” said Alison Branco, director of adaptation. climate change at The Nature Conservancy in New York. . “We’ve seen much worse flooding in the southern parts of the city than around the East River.”

Around New York, tides can raise or lower water levels two to six feet, Branco said. Recent research from Stevens Institute of Technology has shown how a six-hour difference in Sandy’s landfall would have worsened flooding in much of the city and especially in East Harlem, where heavy rains alone can easily overwhelm the streets.

The drains “just don’t have the capacity” for a big rainstorm, said Xavier Santiago, president of Manhattan Community Board 11, let alone a hurricane.

“We were built over marsh and water. We had a river,” he said, referring to the old Harlem Creek that ran along what is now East 106th Street. “We have to think intelligently about: how to pump this water? How can we keep more out? »

Community Board 11 President Xavier Santiago on the East Harlem Esplanade.

In East Harlem, a 280-page resilience report that cost $1 million to produce, as THE CITY previously reported, remains on hold and not fully published.

In it, experts considered the possible reconstruction of East 106th Street as a “green corridor” with a creek or ditch halfway through that would allow for better stormwater drainage. The report outlined ways to make the neighborhood more porous to absorb rainwater and recommended investigating pumping systems that could store stormwater in a “large storage tunnel,” according to an abbreviated version of the report shared with CB11 in April 2021.

The report also looked at a variety of scenarios for rebuilding the waterfront, including decking over FDR Drive to elevate parks and open spaces, or constructing a land barrier or a wall.

But none of it made it past the page.

The neighborhood has seen some resilience projects move forward, including a $120 million project to build flood walls around the Metropolitan Hospital on First Avenue, which opened this spring. The New York Public Housing Authority also made progress in flood mitigation at Sandy-damaged complexes in East Harlem, including the East River Houses, Clinton Houses, Isaacs-Holmes Complex and Metro North Plaza. But there was no comprehensive approach to protect the whole area.

“We are unfortunately not prepared,” Santiago said, adding that after Sandy, “there was an opportunity to really engage and assess the infrastructure, flood resilience and look at it holistically. “.

But since then, “there has been a lack of commitment or reluctance to create a meaningful partnership to right many of the wrongs our community has suffered,” he said, referring to both the old municipal administration and to the present.

Asked by THE CITY, the Mayor’s Office for Climate and Environmental Justice did not say whether the city would release the East Harlem Resilience Report. In a statement, a spokesperson for MOCEJ, Amy Sohn, said the agency “is proud to collaborate with our city, state and federal partners on several East Harlem resilience projects such as the Metropolitan Hospital Flood Wall Resiliency. Project, the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway expansion and the Clinton Houses Stormwater Resiliency project to name a few.

“Additionally, we launched Climate Strong Communities (CSC) earlier this week, which will help create the next pipeline of resilience projects in environmental justice communities that historically face deeper impacts due to climate change. “, she added.

“Think broadly”, act locally

For George Janes, an urban planner and zoning expert who consults with CB11, the lack of specific designs and projects means missing out on the key element to creating meaningful protection: money.

“The problem with not having a plan and not having movement towards developing a plan is that the money – state and federal money for resilience – well, it doesn’t fit in East Harlem because there’s no plan to spend it on,” he said. “And you have to have a plan before you can get funding.”

The issue isn’t just a problem for Harlemites, said Fiona Cousins, president of the Americas region at Arup, a global environmental consultancy. In her work, she says that “you always plan for the last [previous] disaster.”

“Everyone thinks the areas that were hit by Sandy are the areas that would be hit by another hurricane. But in fact, it had very particular characteristics,” she said – a wind pattern that created a huge storm surge and a relatively light amount of rain.

That thinking has widened a bit in 10 years as New Yorkers face more frequent extreme weather, especially since Hurricane Ida hit the city last year, killing 13 people in apartments. in the basement flooded following a downpour of more than 7 inches of rain – a deadly record. .

“I think what we’ve learned between the different storms is that there are many ways storms can impact New York City and therefore we need to think broadly,” said Cousins.

Branco of The Nature Conservancy found that “people are becoming more aware of all the different types of flooding that can impact New York City,” including inland flooding – caused by rains like Ida – and the rising seas.

“Sea level rise is causing our groundwater to rise,” she said. “It impacts our infrastructure, our street drains. You have street flooding, yard flooding. And so we have to remember that we have these periodic events – like hurricanes and rainstorms – but we also have the more chronic type of flooding.

Waves of progress

Certainly, New York has moved forward with massive plans to protect the city from Sandy. In Lower Manhattan, construction of the East Side Coastal Resilience Project – to put a flood barrier between the sea and the Lower East Side – is underway. In the Rockaways, work is underway to fortify six miles of beach with newly reinforced dunes and other flood mitigation measures. And billions have been spent to rebuild flooded subway tunnels, strengthen pumping systems and renovate storm-affected public facilities like hospitals and schools.

But much of the major work has advanced in areas where Sandy has caused the most damage. And even this work has been delayed.

As THE CITY previously reported, about a quarter of federal funds earmarked for post-Sandy infrastructure upgrades and reconstruction went unspent, according to a recent City Comptroller report. This totals $4 billion in unused funds.

On the South Shore of the Bronx – relatively unscathed during the 2012 storm – the city spent just 6.3% of the funding for a resilience project in Hunts Point that would install storage batteries and solar panels in two schools public.

At the Brooklyn Navy Yard, the area’s development corporation spent just 5.9% of the $98 million allocated by FEMA for post-Sandy work. According to the report, only 0.3% of funding for the “Raising Shorelines” program – to raise frequently flooded roads – has been spent, despite the city’s promise that these commitments will be completed by mid-2025.

In East Harlem, local leaders have only seen 71 pages of their neighborhood’s resilience report, which was released weeks after THE CITY reported on the shelved document in early 2021. The rest remains secret. , despite the community council’s request for the full version through the state’s Freedom of Information Act.

The sun glistens over the water where the East River meets the Harlem River.

Branco said it’s “not uncommon for communities to do planning work and end it on the shelf.”

“We see it over and over and over again, for a whole host of reasons,” she said.

But getting that job done is an important first step. Pushing to implement it is a whole other battle.

“They just have to keep reminding everyone. Unfortunately, it’s an extremely big city and there are neighborhoods everywhere that need this type of planning,” she said. “They just need to remind everyone that they’re here and they’ve done a lot of work.”

Santiago from CB11 is ready to dive.

“Let’s get into the meat and potatoes of it all,” he said. “From my point of view, even if it is a draft, it is taxpayers’ money that has been paid. We should have access to this information.

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Ludlow Neighborhood of Shaker Heights Receives Ohio Historic Marker | Local News https://sadc-tribunal.org/ludlow-neighborhood-of-shaker-heights-receives-ohio-historic-marker-local-news/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 12:15:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/ludlow-neighborhood-of-shaker-heights-receives-ohio-historic-marker-local-news/ When a bomb exploded in John and Dorothy Pegg’s garage on Corby Road on January 3, 1956, ripping a hole in the wall of the black couple’s dining room, it rocked the Ludlow neighborhood. Isaacs A neighbor, Bernard Isaacs, sprang into action, leading the effort to form the Ludlow Community Association, which worked to integrate […]]]>

When a bomb exploded in John and Dorothy Pegg’s garage on Corby Road on January 3, 1956, ripping a hole in the wall of the black couple’s dining room, it rocked the Ludlow neighborhood.






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A neighbor, Bernard Isaacs, sprang into action, leading the effort to form the Ludlow Community Association, which worked to integrate the neighborhood in multiple ways, including forming the Ludlow Community Bank, which provided loans to black families hoping to buy homes in the neighborhood. Isaacs became the association’s second president. The first was Irwin Barnett, who was a member of Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple in Beachwood.

Hammond, who lives in the Washington, D.C. area, was back in his old neighborhood Oct. 20 to celebrate the unveiling of a bronze Ohio historical marker at the corner of Corby and Hampton roads, noting the efforts of neighbors to counter practices designed to keep suburbs segregated, such as blockbusting, where real estate agents tried to persuade white people to sell low once a black family bought a house in a particular neighborhood, and redlining, in which banks refused to lend to blacks in certain neighborhoods.







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The marker in the Ludlow neighborhood is one of seven locations identified by the Cleveland Restoration Society in its effort to create an African-American Civil Rights Trail in Cleveland, the first of its kind in a northern city.

Hammond, whose family moved to the neighborhood in 1961, four years after the Ludlow Community Association was founded, recalls growing up in a neighborhood where children liked to ice skate together in a pattern she said the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. would have appreciated it. .

However, “even up until the 1950s, families moving into Ludlow had to get 20 signatures from their neighbors before they could buy a house,” Hammond said, paraphrasing Isaacs on the Supreme Court’s Shelley v. Kraemer, who overturned racial covenants. , like those in Shaker Heights. “It was not an easy decision for the Whites who decided to stay after the bombardment.”







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Shelly Stokes Hammond talks about growing up in Ludlow.




She also quoted Barnett as saying, “’…you’re starting to question his judgment. Maybe my neighbors are right – how do I know property values ​​won’t go down – what will happen to the quality of our schools? … I found my voice.’”

Other founding members included the Branches, Fitchs, Fonoroffs, Kings, Ladanyis, Martins, Masons, Mazohs, Polsters, Richies, Seldins, Spinnels and Walkers, according to Hammond, who wrote his master’s thesis on the Ludlow Community Association.

“By working together primarily in their homes, backyards and schools, the LCA has reversed the trend of white flight, blockbusting and re-segregation,” Hammond said. “Pioneers such as Joseph and Joanne Finley, Allan Gressell, Carolyn and Burt Milter and Ron Spetrino helped with the housing program, fundraising and buying straw.”

The example of the entire Ludlow Community Association was copied in other neighborhoods in Shaker Heights, including Moreland and Lomond, but also became a model for neighborhoods across the country.

The Oct. 20 memorial attended by more than 100 people was held in memory of Isaacs and Kevin Lowery, co-chair of the Ludlow Community Association, who died in July.

Barnett’s son, William Barnett, who spent much of his childhood in Ludlow, said efforts to stabilize the neighborhood came to fruition in 1968 through the efforts of the Ludlow Community Association after estate agents called the desirable neighborhood for whites as a “lost cause.”

He said residents are hosting community events, including housing tours, to introduce the neighborhood to potential buyers.

“I grew up with African-American friends,” Barnett told the Cleveland Jewish News on October 24. “It was just normal for me.”

He also remembered his mother, the late Emilie Barnett, throwing a block party in 1963 to introduce the neighborhood to African ambassadors, who were discriminated against when they crossed the Maryland line while driving from New York to Washington, DC.

“My mom had seen this and she wanted to reach out and show them a community that was kind of a landmark in the United States in terms of African Americans and white people coming together and living together,” said said Barnett. “So she contacted the State Department.”

Letters from African ambassadors in 1963

Judge Dan Aaron Polster also attended the commemoration. He grew up on Keswick Road and his parents, Elinor and the late Lewis Polster, were founders of the Ludlow Community Association.

“It was a great place to grow up,” Polster told the Cleveland Jewish News on October 20. “I didn’t realize how historic it was until later, maybe in high school,” Polster said. “And what I learned is that ordinary people can do extraordinary things if they don’t take a pass. We all have excuses: it’s too hard, someone else will do it, whatever. …And I know the Jewish concept of minyan is, you get 10 people, you can support each other. And that’s what they did. Probably none of them could have done it alone. But this little group together, they did it and they changed the world. Just people, regular people, so it’s great to be a part of that.

Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish spoke about the discrimination he faced as Ohio House’s first Jewish speaker.

“I felt that no more and no less than many of you have felt trying to deal with the prejudices that still exist in the community,” he said. “It’s so important. It’s important to all of us. But I’ll tell you, it’s also important to me personally, because as a Jew, the Jewish community has been involved in the civil rights movement from the beginning.







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Cuyahoga County Executive Armond Budish addresses the rally.




Budish was credited for his support in obtaining the historical marker.

Shaker Heights Mayor David Weiss also spoke about the importance of the marker and the timing.







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Shaker Heights Mayor David Weiss addresses the crowd.




“Let me say that the restrictions and practices that have established and maintained segregation here are part of our local history. Frankly, it’s not a part we’re proud of. And yet, we have to recognize that if we want to go beyond that,” Weiss said. “And with the help of this marker, we can ensure that future generations know of the progressive, determined and socially conscious residents of Ludlow of the late 1950s and beyond, who were among the first to address the racial integration. And in doing so, they laid the groundwork and set the framework for the candid dialogue about race that continues in Shaker Heights to this day. … With this marker, it is an important reminder that we have an impressive heritage, even impressive, to be respected, and we intend to do so.

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