Maori nursing home population set to rise

Gideon Porter

Maori nursing home population set to rise

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A Maori health researcher who studies end-of-life care says it is inevitable that more people will place their loved ones in palliative care or nursing homes.

A Maori health researcher who studies end-of-life care says it is inevitable that more people will place their loved ones in palliative care or nursing homes.

Dr Tess Moeke-Maxwell, from the Te Ārai research group, says that while only 3% of Maori are now in nursing homes, that number will increase.

She says caring for older people with high needs is difficult and fewer people are mentally and physically prepared – or for conflict with jobs or family care needs.

His own whanau is struggling with the problems.

“Fortunately we have a large whanau so that we can wrap our kuia, who is now 89 years old – to live independently, but nevertheless the time will come… and if she is not able to live independently at the home, she has already told us that she would like to receive 24/7 care,” says Dr. Moeke-Maxwell.

She says that with many young whanau moving to Australia for work, there are fewer, and often older, relationships left to care for elderly relatives.


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