Residents of Sacramento neighborhood protest possible homeless shelter

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On Saturday, neighbors in the Brentwood area staged a rally on 24th Street and 48th Avenue in Sacramento to protest a possible homeless shelter in the area. “Safety is our number one concern here,” said parent Angela Tepa. “It’s so close to our little league, our park, our community, our homes. In a draft of its 2021 baseline master plan, the city identified the intersection of 24 and 48 as a potential site for land and safe parking, with an estimated capacity of 100 people per year. “It’s just not the right place,” said Joanne Jauregui, president of the Airport Little League, who added that the area already faces a list of problems. “Crime, drug trafficking, prostitution, urinating… over the past two years it’s gradually gotten worse. I don’t want to risk seeing what else will happen.” The proposed site would be adjacent to a baseball field. land frequented by neighborhood children. There are additional ball fields across the street and a few blocks away. “The kids travel with each other all the time,” said Chris Jones, who is considering running for District 5 city council. “While it’s important that we find places to go for homeless people, we need to be aware of the immediate areas. I would love to see the city press the pause button. ” “It’s not about not helping the homeless,” said resident Matt King, who was himself homeless. “It is not a safe place. We have children between the ages of 15 and 6 or 7. They look at needles, they look at crack pipes.” KCRA 3 raised these concerns with Deputy Mayor Jay Schenirer, who represents the district. “We have a huge challenge with homeless people,” Schenirer said. “We want to put them under a roof or a safe camping space to connect them with services and a path to success.” Schenirer added that the intersection is not one of the city’s 20 priority sites listed for construction of transitional housing, and that there are many more assessments to be done before a final decision is made. is taken on the future of the site. “Before we take action, we will engage with the community. They are not going to wake up tomorrow, walk outside and find a homeless shelter in their neighborhood,” Schenirer said. “We don’t work that way. I certainly don’t work that way.” The deputy mayor said any form of shelter, in general, would be designed with safety in mind and offer services focused on evacuating homeless people from the streets at all times. “We have to be a compassionate city,” Schenirer said. “People want to solve the homeless problem, but people have to be ready to participate in this solution. We cannot do it ourselves.”

On Saturday, neighbors in the Brentwood area staged a rally on 24th Street and 48th Avenue in Sacramento to protest a possible homeless shelter coming to the area.

“Safety is our number one concern here,” said parent Angela Tepa. “It’s so close to our Little League, our park, our community, our homes.”

In a draft of its 2021 baseline master plan, the city identified the intersection of 24th and 48th as a potential site for ground safety and safe parking, with an estimated capacity of 100 people per year.

“It’s just not the right place,” said Joanne Jauregui, president of the Airport Little League, who added that the area already faces a list of problems. “Crime, drug trafficking, prostitution, urinating… over the past two years it’s gradually gotten worse. I don’t want to risk seeing what else will happen.”

The proposed site would be adjacent to a baseball field frequented by neighborhood children. There are additional ball fields across the street and a few blocks away.

“The kids travel with each other all the time,” said Chris Jones, who is considering running for District 5 city council. “While it’s important that we find places to go for homeless people, we need to be aware of the immediate areas. I would love to see the city press the pause button. ”

“It’s not about not helping the homeless,” said resident Matt King, who was himself homeless. “It’s not a safe place. We have kids aged 15 to 6 or 7. They look at needles, they look at crack pipes.”

KCRA 3 conveyed these concerns to Deputy Mayor Jay Schenirer, who represents the district.

“We have a huge challenge with homeless people,” Schenirer said. “We want to put them under a roof or a safe camping space to connect them with services and a path to success.”

Schenirer added that the intersection is not one of the city’s 20 priority sites listed for construction of transitional housing, and that there are many more assessments to be done before a final decision is made. is taken on the future of the site.

“Before we take action, we’re going to engage with the community. They’re not going to wake up tomorrow, walk out and over there. [see] a homeless shelter in their neighborhood, ”said Schenirer. “We don’t work that way. I certainly don’t work that way. “

The deputy mayor said any form of shelter, in general, would be designed with safety in mind and offer services geared towards getting homeless people off the streets permanently.

“We have to be a compassionate city,” Schenirer said. “People want to solve the homeless problem, but people have to be ready to participate in this solution. We cannot do it ourselves.”


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