single family – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 18:52:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sadc-tribunal.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/favicon-1.png single family – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ 32 32 Killeen Council moves forward with 333-lot Clear Creek neighborhood | Local News https://sadc-tribunal.org/killeen-council-moves-forward-with-333-lot-clear-creek-neighborhood-local-news/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 01:15:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/killeen-council-moves-forward-with-333-lot-clear-creek-neighborhood-local-news/ After nearly a month of negotiations, Killeen City Council moved forward on Tuesday in approving Joshua Welch’s large 333-lot single-family development on Clear Creek Road. Although a significant amount of work remains to be done, City Council unanimously approved the development after several rounds of presentations and sessions at the bargaining table between Welch and […]]]>

After nearly a month of negotiations, Killeen City Council moved forward on Tuesday in approving Joshua Welch’s large 333-lot single-family development on Clear Creek Road.

Although a significant amount of work remains to be done, City Council unanimously approved the development after several rounds of presentations and sessions at the bargaining table between Welch and city staff.

The development is a total of approximately 80 acres and would be located adjacent to Clear Creek Road, roughly between Modoc Drive and Reese Creek Road.

Since its initial presentation on January 25, the development includes more “green spaces” and dedicated parks, as well as a host of other amenities and compromises.

After presenting the unit’s planned development one last time, planning director Wallis Meshier said staff now recommend supporting the development, without additional restrictions.

“In the spirit of compromise, the staff recommends approving the development,” she said.

Previously, city staff had recommended approving the development if it completely removed “snout houses” or those whose garages take up more than 50% of the house’s foreground facing the street.

However, Meshier said, “I think there has been enough compromise on both sides.”

Councilman Michael Boyd, despite a $1,000 campaign donation from Welch last year, has been the most vocal member of council regarding the development and the most critical. On Tuesday, the councilman said that despite some outlying issues, Welch had addressed many of his concerns, but not all.

Boyd’s previous requests for privacy fencing for housing on collector streets that connect to Clear Creek Road and Reese Creek Road, as well as increased green space and a more substantial neighborhood park had been satisfied. However, some concerns, such as a request for soundproofing for a residence near Clear Creek Road, were not met.

“As I can see here, these last concerns have not been resolved,” Boyd said. “These compromises with the developers are essential, they should be; but I don’t want to give compliments for this stuff.

Councilor Mellisa Brown raised a point of concern regarding the use of two drainage routes to expand the total amount of “green space”. According to Brown, the design of the tract may be too steep or too treacherous for children to use.

“We should avoid a situation where someone hurts themselves, or worse, a child,” she said.

However, Welch said he could not provide details on the design of the drainage routes, as these are usually completed towards the end of development. He also pointed out that his company will have to meet with the city engineer before completing specifications for the lanes.

In the end, Boyd thanked Welch for his ability to compromise and for focusing on the livability of the development.

“I want to thank you for taking the initiative to ensure that the TIA is realised, the pavilion and what it will do for development; again, we did some rounds, but it was worth it,” Boyd said.

Councilwoman Jessica Gonzalez spoke similarly, saying the public negotiation of the development has been fresh and productive.

“It’s really new; I think this is the first time we’ve worked on things like this publicly, and I think it sets a really good standard,” Gonzalez said.

While Brown echoed the city council’s negotiation support, she also said that approving the development would make it less restrictive than current architectural standards, and asked to modify the approval motion on the condition that the development does not have overhanging garages. The motion failed to garner a second.

A motion was presented to approve the development, which passed unanimously.

Speaking after the meeting, Welch said the negotiations had been difficult, but the end product is one that “residents will appreciate”.

“There was a lot of effort and time invested,” he said. “At the end of the day, we have a good project planned, it will be good for the region. We have a good project in place; it’s more restrictive than anything I’ve seen in Killeen, but I think it will be a good neighborhood that residents will enjoy.

Now that the project has planned unit development zoning, Welch still needs to complete and submit a final platform, finalize construction plans and, as part of its agreement with the city, complete an impact analysis on the circulation.

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City Grant Used to Advance Dayton Neighborhood – WHIO TV 7 and WHIO Radio https://sadc-tribunal.org/city-grant-used-to-advance-dayton-neighborhood-whio-tv-7-and-whio-radio/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 15:48:21 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/city-grant-used-to-advance-dayton-neighborhood-whio-tv-7-and-whio-radio/ DAYTON – The City of Dayton is looking to spend more than $60,000 to revitalize a neighborhood in west Dayton. News Center 7 spoke to city planners and residents of the Westwood neighborhood about what they hope this latest investment will do to stabilize and provide more opportunity for the area. >> ‘This is absolutely […]]]>

DAYTON – The City of Dayton is looking to spend more than $60,000 to revitalize a neighborhood in west Dayton.

News Center 7 spoke to city planners and residents of the Westwood neighborhood about what they hope this latest investment will do to stabilize and provide more opportunity for the area.

>> ‘This is absolutely ridiculous;’ Neighbors say city is slow to remove abandoned and vacant buildings

The city said the grant money will help fund a future economic development and housing plan for the Westwood neighborhood, which is a place the city says is well worth the investment.

“It’s new to the neighborhood. It’s something that residents and stakeholders brought to us as something they wanted,” said Tony Kroeger, who is the director of the city’s planning commission.

The Westwood neighborhood is one of the largest in the city, twelfth in size and seventh in population. The study will focus more on housing economics than any other area, and it is long overdue.

“A neighborhood plan, specifically for Westwood hasn’t been done in my time here, it’s about 15 years,” Kroeger said.

City leaders said the $62,000 grant will help plan the sprawling neighborhood bounded by West Third Street, Gettysburg Avenue, James H. McGee and Wolf Creek.

Residents said they were optimistic about the potential plan.

“Dayton is coming back, but it’s going to take time,” resident Clarence Long said. Long also admits to being a bit pessimistic about how the process might unfold.

“Amazing how much money they spend and then it doesn’t go where it’s supposed to go,” Long said.

>> Coronavirus: CDC considering updates to masking guidelines

City leaders said the money will be used to hire a consultant who will hold community meetings to develop community priorities and a plan to achieve them. Work has already been done to end the degraded and dangerous conditions here.

“The neighborhoods have changed a lot. It’s not as dense as before. There was a lot of demolition there,” Kroeger said.

City planners said there was more to do, but they spent as much money on nuisance abatement here as in any other part of town. Taking a drive down the street shows some of the empty lots, as well as a mix of new and older housing, some of which may need to be demolished.

“It could be a bigger, cleaner, greener neighborhood if it’s done right,” Kroeger said.

Most of the study will focus on housing since the neighborhood is almost entirely made up of single-family homes and heavily residential. Neighborhood residents said they would also like attention to be paid to potential retail opportunities.

“We need stores, we need groceries, we need places where you can spend your money without going 15 to 20 miles,” Long said.

There has already been a concentrated effort to replace older housing with newer homes and bring the neighborhood up to standard. Residents hope the new study is more than words on paper and will move the community forward.

Dayton Mayor Jeffrey Mims said he’s glad the federal government and the Biden administration have made grants like this possible.

Mims said the grant will be used to help prioritize what needs to be done in the neighborhood.

City leaders said they estimate it would take about a year to hire a consultant, hold community meetings and develop plans and priorities.

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Grand Duval Neighborhood ‘Revitalization’ Begins Under Gainesville Pilot Program https://sadc-tribunal.org/grand-duval-neighborhood-revitalization-begins-under-gainesville-pilot-program/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 22:07:08 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/grand-duval-neighborhood-revitalization-begins-under-gainesville-pilot-program/ Ashley Burke couldn’t believe her eyes as she watched volunteers sawing wood for her new three-bedroom home in the Greater Duval neighborhood on Monday morning. This will be the first house his family will own. The house at 1609 NE Ninth Ave. is among the first 11 to be funded under a pilot land donation […]]]>

Ashley Burke couldn’t believe her eyes as she watched volunteers sawing wood for her new three-bedroom home in the Greater Duval neighborhood on Monday morning.

This will be the first house his family will own.

The house at 1609 NE Ninth Ave. is among the first 11 to be funded under a pilot land donation program.

The City of Gainesville is donating the land and Alachua Habitat for Humanity is developing the homes with the help of donations, grants, volunteers, and down payment from prospective homeowners.

Collaboration: Collaborate to increase the supply of affordable housing

Shortage of affordable housing: Inclusive zoning is the answer to Gainesville’s affordable housing crisis

Habitat continues to seek customers: https://www.alachuahabitat.org/

Last year, the City Commission of Gainesville selected Alachua Habitat for Humanity to develop 2, 3, and 4-bedroom homes on lots for sale to new income-eligible homeowners.

Alachua Habitat for Humanity

The nonprofit developer plans to complete construction of the first four homes within two years.

The city keeps single-family home costs permanently affordable through a requirement in its housing agreement that limits sales to income-qualified buyers.

Neighbors such as Burke whose household income does not exceed 80% of the area’s median income as defined by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development may be eligible to purchase one of the affordable homes.

In Gainesville, a family of four whose annual income does not exceed $58,550 may qualify, while the income limit for a single applicant would be $41,000.

“I’ve never had a moment where I felt so special,” Burke said as she stood near the new foundation of her home. “Maybe another time when I was coming back from Iraq (military tour) when everyone was cheering at the airport.”

Burke, 33, graduated from Eastside High School in 2006 and grew up in the Duval neighborhood.

The single stay-at-home mom said she has been unable to buy a house until now due to poor financial decisions at a young age that led to credit issues, which have been fixed.

As a result, she said she continued to struggle to pay high rent for apartments that often had unresolved maintenance issues such as mold.

She said her daughter, Aubrey, was thrilled to finally be able to move into her own home.

“I’m engaged to a really good guy,” Burke said. “It was really difficult. He’s my only child. Her father was just murdered last year. (With the house), I can give (Aubrey) something to look forward to. She is super excited. It was very difficult to cheer him up. She could see that Mom is trying to work for a place we call home.

Burke and several other new owners expressed their gratitude at a groundbreaking ceremony Monday attended by city and county officials as well as neighborhood residents.

Mayor Lauren Poe told the crowd that the project had been delayed due to the pandemic, as it was considered in 2019 by the city’s neighborhood improvement staff.

“Rather than just continuing to give one batch at a time, they had a vision that greater impact could be achieved by putting multiple batches together,” he said.

In 2021, the city announced that a nonprofit would partner with them in the effort, and Alachua Habitat for Humanity was chosen.

“We wanted to do this with the neighborhood, not for the neighborhood,” he said. “Greater Duval is a great example of empowerment.

Poe said he remembered going to one of the community meetings in the Duval neighborhood early in his term as mayor and the residents creating their own strategic plan without any help from the city.

And part of that plan is that they wanted to bring in three to four new neighbors every year, he said.

Commissioner Desmon Duncan-Walker, who represents the district, expressed excitement over the sounds of construction in the background.

“I want us to just take a moment to say, ‘This is the sound of revitalization. This is the sound of revitalization,'” she said. about it?I’m definitely excited about it.

Duncan-Walker, whose family has lived in the Duval neighborhood for more than 60 years, said neighbors played a major role in getting the project off the ground.

“Your input was absolutely vital and got us to the point,” she said.

Gainesville Community Reinvestment Area

Gainesville Community Reinvestment Area Manager Sarah Vidal said it was a great collaborative project.

“It’s a wonderful example of how when many departments come together and leverage what we each have to bring, how we can do something great,” she said.

She said they were able to fund the new 9th Avenue Extension Road project, which “makes more land available for redevelopment” in the area.

Rev. Earnestine Butler, senior pastor of the Agape Faith Center, said they wanted well-built homes that they could pass on to their neighborhood children, and these new homes fit the bill.

“Our homes need to be secure. It needs to be a safe place, a quiet neighborhood, a loving neighborhood, and that’s what we did in Grand Duval,” she said. “We all stayed together. We are gathered. We envision bigger projects, doing better things.

Scott Winzeler, director of outreach and development for Alachua Habitat for Humanity, said the collaboration to launch the project “is groundbreaking in every sense of the word.”

“We are ushering in a partnership with residents of Greater Duval and housing that will unify, solidify, but not gentrify the character of this neighborhood,” he said.

This article originally appeared on The Gainesville Sun: Affordable housing pilot program ushers in Duval community

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Summerville Neighborhood Townhouse Plans Denied by City Council | News https://sadc-tribunal.org/summerville-neighborhood-townhouse-plans-denied-by-city-council-news/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 20:45:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/summerville-neighborhood-townhouse-plans-denied-by-city-council-news/ SUMMERVILLE — Plans for a townhouse complex off U.S. Highway 78 won’t see the light of day — at least not through the city council. Developers along with Dan Ryan Builders and South Pointe Ventures were denied permission to annex nearly 16 acres of Dorchester County land to the town of Summerville. The property is […]]]>

SUMMERVILLE — Plans for a townhouse complex off U.S. Highway 78 won’t see the light of day — at least not through the city council.

Developers along with Dan Ryan Builders and South Pointe Ventures were denied permission to annex nearly 16 acres of Dorchester County land to the town of Summerville.

The property is located off US 78, approximately one mile from the Berlin G. Myers Parkway.

The goal after annexation was to zone multi-family residential property and build townhouses. The Summerville Planning Commission recommended council members deny approval, and officials followed suit.

Commission members highlighted the heavy traffic in the area. Residents and officials said it was often impossible to get out of the South Pointe community.

“It’s a very populated area,” said Kevin Carroll, one of the commission members.

At a recent town council meeting, Ron Bullman, a representative of Dan Ryan Builders, spoke on behalf of the developers and owner.

According to Bullman, the owner is determined to do something with the property. Refusal does not mean the package disappears, he said.

“People come to Summerville,” he said.

The property is called “donut hole”. It is a small county property surrounded entirely by land owned by the City of Summerville.

Summerville will focus on businesses in small pockets of unincorporated Dorchester County

This recent annexation attempt marks the second time the developers have tried to do something with the property. In 2020, they attempted to build a 228-unit apartment complex, but the petition was withdrawn following community refusal.

It is zoned as a transitional residential neighborhood in Dorchester County. This zoning allows manufactured homes.

“We would really hate to see this parcel turn into a trailer park,” Bullman said.

Residents of the nearby community of South Pointe were relieved to hear the council’s denial decision. One resident, Tom Clark, said he hadn’t met anyone in South Pointe who was in favor of townhouses.

Tracy Hirsch has lived there since 2008. She expressed concern that the area was already extremely crowded.

“The roads can no longer support people,” she said. “We don’t have the schools in place.”

Summerville residents push back on 228-unit complex to potentially move closer to downtown

At the recent town council meeting and other gatherings, some community members said they were only okay if single-family homes were on the property.

In the meantime, they hope issues such as traffic and flooding will be resolved before further construction in the area is approved.

To reach jerrel floyd at 843-937-5558. Follow him on Twitter @jfloyd134.

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UWS townhouse asking for $ 30 million is said to be the most expensive in the neighborhood https://sadc-tribunal.org/uws-townhouse-asking-for-30-million-is-said-to-be-the-most-expensive-in-the-neighborhood/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 21:22:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/uws-townhouse-asking-for-30-million-is-said-to-be-the-most-expensive-in-the-neighborhood/ [ad_1] From left to right: Ileana Lopez-Balboa from Corcoran and Charlie Attias from Compass in front of 248 Central Park West (Corcoran, Compass, StreetEasy) The buyer of a historic Upper West Side home may soon own the most expensive townhouse in the neighborhood. A townhouse at 248 Central Park West asking for $ 30 million […]]]>


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From left to right: Ileana Lopez-Balboa from Corcoran and Charlie Attias from Compass in front of 248 Central Park West (Corcoran, Compass, StreetEasy)

The buyer of a historic Upper West Side home may soon own the most expensive townhouse in the neighborhood.

A townhouse at 248 Central Park West asking for $ 30 million was closed this week, by Compass. If the sale goes through, that would make the property the most expensive townhouse sold on the Upper West Side, according to valuation firm Miller Samuel.

The last time the home attempted to sell for that price was in 2018, when Michael Sieger, a brokerage firm with Sotheby’s International Realty, attempted to market the home for $ 29 million, The New York Times reported. The home was taken down and put back on the market, ultimately selling for $ 16.25 million in 2019, according to property records.

Two years and an ongoing pandemic later, the housing market has changed – and so has the house. The newly renovated home was listed by Corcoran in mid-September for $ 30 million. Less than three months later, a buyer was ready to sign the fine print.

Charlie Attias of Compass, who represented the anonymous buyer, said the sale was proof that the Upper West Side “is a pretty healthy market.” He postulated that the deal would set a neighborhood benchmark that would boost more broken records in the future.

Covering nearly 10,000 square feet, the six-story home has six bedrooms, though the layout can be reconfigured to accommodate up to eight. It has seven full baths and two half baths, as well as a 1,875 square foot wellness center with a heated swimming pool, jacuzzi, sauna and hydrotherapy steam shower and massage.

The house has undergone extensive renovations over the past two years, using environmentally friendly and non-toxic materials. Other features include a virtual doorman, a new security system and a dehumidification system.

The house is one of the last three single-family homes on the avenue and was built by developer William Noble in 1887. Throughout its 134-year history were the parents of Generals Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant , who visited the wealthy colonel who owned the house in the years following the Civil War.

Ileana Lopez-Balboa of Corcoran represented the vendor. Corcoran declined to comment for this story.

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Central 9th ​​is gaining popularity https://sadc-tribunal.org/central-9th-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bis-gaining-popularity/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 13:39:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/central-9th-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bis-gaining-popularity/ [ad_1] The Central 9th ​​district began as a carving of a much larger district, a hamlet whose urban zoning and access to public transport gave it a distinct impression within its boundaries. The area closest to the center of the neighborhood has long attracted the attention of developers who have started or are in the […]]]>


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The Central 9th ​​district began as a carving of a much larger district, a hamlet whose urban zoning and access to public transport gave it a distinct impression within its boundaries.

The area closest to the center of the neighborhood has long attracted the attention of developers who have started or are in the process of filling the neighborhood’s “main street” with a wide range of uses such as a center for digital media arts for. young people, architectural firms, restaurants, bars and a new cider house.

A list of proposed new housing projects shows the growing popularity of the area with developers as well as residents.

With so many changes in the built environment, including major transportation projects, zoning requests, announcements promoting proximity to the area, and a construction boom, we thought this was the right one. moment to shed light on what might change Central 9th ​​in the years to come.

What began as the Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency’s “West Temple Gateway” created the unique identity of the Central 9th ​​district. Urban zoning, city incentives and access to public transit have helped the neighborhood forge its own identity and, recently, flourish. Image courtesy of SLC RDA.

What, where and why is Central 9th?

Central 9th ​​is a district of Ballpark (formerly known as Peoples’ Freeway). It can be described as a sort of urban village, with an epicenter at 200 West 900 South and boundaries stretching from 600 South to about 1000 South, Main Street at 300 West.

The neighborhood is distinct in part because of the zoning which allows for a de jure pedestrian density, with two types of zoning in the core allowing either high infill density or medium infill density.

Washington and Jefferson Streets are home to older, often Victorian single-family or duplex residences, and are zoned Form-Based Urban Neighborhood 1 (FBUN1), allowing infill on these lots. Developers and owners have already started adding quads and more to these streets.

The streets bordering the heart of the neighborhood are FBUN2, which allows for a mix of uses in four- or five-story buildings that require no minimum front setbacks.

The neighborhood benefits from the east-to-west bus line on the 900 South with 15-minute trips and a tram offering 15-minute trips through the valley from multiple lines. The city is building a multi-use path that will link the eastern and western districts by bicycle.

Central 9th ​​is bounded by an oversized exit ramp that creates an unmistakable physical barrier separating the heart of the neighborhood from its southernmost boundary. It also ensures that acres of valuable land remain undeveloped.

In terms of developable land, the builders are in the process of filling what we’ll call Central 9th ​​Main Street.

The heart of the Central 9th ​​district, framed by new buildings made possible by the FBUN2 zoning. City crews are working to create a multipurpose path on the right, power lines will be put underground and new buildings already under construction will continue to frame the street near 200 W. 900 S. Photo by Taylor Anderson.

Wirehang out on central 9th ​​’Main Street’

For years, an abandoned natural gas filling station was located at the east end of Main Street in Central 9th. Plans came and went – a building permit was even withdrawn – but nothing materialized. We now have a glimpse of what could block the village center in 2022.

The developers had planned a mixed-use townhouse development on the site, at 110 W. 900 S. Instead, the property is being acquired by CW Urban. The group, a sponsor of Building Salt Lake, specializes in quick-build townhouse developments, but has recently ventured into urban design with projects in Downtown and elsewhere in Central 9th.

CW has also just closed on the old Henrie’s Cleaners at 906 S. 200 W., the site of one of two projects that will fill the middle of the neighborhood. It is one of two mixed-use buildings, known as Sydney and Slate, that will have the largest footprint in the neighborhood.

Sydney and Slate will flank and activate a lane between 200 West and Washington Street. They promise to expand the retail and restaurant space that is already strong in the village. The new homes above will continue to add energy and life to the streets below.

The female-led Maven District expanded its portfolio to 945 S. 300 W., framing the western boundary of Central 9th. It also offers space for new residents as well as offices and restaurants.

Builders are working on a 9 unit apartment building at 120 W. 900 S., and construction continues on several new builds in Washington south of 900 South.

All of this gives rise to a wave of construction in the region in tandem with a major street reconstruction project that will ground power lines and connect the east and west sides of the capital via a multi-use trail called the 9-Line.

The activity will visually fill and frame the central 9th ​​’Main Street’ and the new popularity has helped to attract attention on the outskirts of the neighborhood.

Goltz Avenue and Jefferson Street, outside the limits of Central 9th. Apartments C9, rezoned in RMU to accommodate the six-story apartment building on the right. A mix of single-family, duplex and quadruple on the left. One developer hopes to rezon several properties in the area from RMF-35 to FBUN2, which would allow more flexibility and effectively extend the 9th centre’s footprint to the south. Photo by Taylor Anderson.

South direction? Goltz / Jefferson Avenue rezoning

Before the end of the year, TAG SLC, another Building Salt Lake sponsor, applied for a rezoning of four properties near Jefferson Park, just south of Central 9th.

Requirement ? Extend the footprint of the urban neighborhood based on Forms 2 to the south.

The developer did not submit specific plans for duplex and single-family homes that would ultimately likely be demolished and replaced with a number of permitted infill developments in FBUN2 areas (likely townhouses or apartments).

Instead, he highlighted the proximity between TRAX stations at both 1300 South and 900 South, as well as the 900 South bus line and the growing possibility of walking in the area.

The area is considered to be very passable on foot and by bike, with good access to public transportation, according to the WalkScore website.

“The proposed rezoning will allow for the creation of a significant number of units without impacting the neighborhood more than these already existing projects,” wrote TAG SLC, highlighting the adjacent six-story C9 lofts that have been built in recent years.

Much of the neighborhood south of the exit ramp is zoned RMF-35, allowing developers who own enough properties to meet zoning requirements to demolish existing homes and build multi-family apartments.

But the region is struggling with perceived crime issues, and developers are touting the increase in eyes and feet on the streets as potential benefits in stamping out criminal activity. TAG SLC was no different.

“The additional surveillance offered by the possible projects under the rezones will have a positive impact on the neighborhood by improving the neighboring park and creating the density necessary to more adequately support public transport and commercial amenities in the region. “

If the planning commission and city council approve the zoning request, TAG SLC could build anything, whether it be cottage developments, townhouses, multi-family residences, mixed-use or storefronts, depending on the specifics of each plot.

An industrial warehouse on over an acre of land at 46 W. Fayette Ave., near the east end of Central 9th, is for sale. It is marketed to developers who might be interested in taking advantage of the adjacent downtown zoning that would allow a building up to 120 feet. Photo by Taylor Anderson.

A tower in Central 9th?

Mark this as long haul, but this property on the east end of the neighborhood is being marketed to developers who might want to take advantage of the adjacent downtown zoning and add height just steps from Central 9th.

The existing property spans over an acre of land in the southernmost part of the D-2 zoning, allowing the building to have zero setbacks and to extend in height.

“The desirable D-2 zoning allows for a building height of 65 ‘on the right and up to 120’ with a design review – a rarity in Granary,” the listing notes, referring to the neighboring district of Granary.

Much of the Granary District remains zoned for auto-oriented General Commerce (CG), which has large minimum lot sizes, high parking requirements, and yard setbacks, and is capped at no more than 90 feet after l design review.

Central 9th, on the other hand, is a mix of city zoning with setbacks and minimal parking requirements. A one-acre property that was no longer used as an industrial warehouse with a surface parking front yard being redeveloped would begin to expand the neighborhood to the east.

The property could also simply be adapted for a new use or remain the same.

Regardless, it’s hard to deny that as long as the I-15 off-ramp remains, it can be difficult to connect developments on the east side of the neighborhood with those in the center.

Want to know where developers are offering and building new apartments in Salt Lake, or just want to support a local source of information about what’s going on in your neighborhood? Subscribe to Salt Lake City Construction.

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Country Club Manor District Concerned About 3-Storey Apartment Building Project | News https://sadc-tribunal.org/country-club-manor-district-concerned-about-3-storey-apartment-building-project-news/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 00:19:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/country-club-manor-district-concerned-about-3-storey-apartment-building-project-news/ [ad_1] ROCHESTER, Minn. – Residents of the Country Club Manor neighborhood object to the size of a 3-story apartment building that should be built – saying it will not be suitable for the neighborhood. Titan Development plans to develop a 3 story building on 2.3 acres of land located at 36th and Country Club Rd. […]]]>


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ROCHESTER, Minn. – Residents of the Country Club Manor neighborhood object to the size of a 3-story apartment building that should be built – saying it will not be suitable for the neighborhood.

Titan Development plans to develop a 3 story building on 2.3 acres of land located at 36th and Country Club Rd. In an effort for more affordable housing.

The proposed 72-unit apartment would be raised to prevent flooding, along with driveways and parking spaces directly behind the owners’ one-story homes.

Owners Steve and Terry Fields live directly behind the grounds, they tell KIMT News 3 their biggest concerns are getting no sun and no privacy. They also say it would bring more traffic.

Other neighbors KIMT spoke to say they are not against affordable housing, the problem is the size and proximity of small single family homes.

Affordable housing – all of us neighbors are for that, we think the city of Rochester needs it – but they could have chosen a much better place to put it, rather than sticking this huge building on a piece of land. 2.3 acres, ”says Steve Champs.

Terry Fields adds, “We think it’s done because the city wants affordable housing, but let’s face it, you can’t cram a three story building on a tiny lot just to get your affordable housing.

The neighbors want the developers to reconsider a building in the R-2 zone that would allow duplexes.

David, who has lived in this neighborhood for 30 years, says, “It could have been handled differently, life will change dramatically and no matter what we say or do, it will basically happen. ”

He says he’s been reassured by the developer and council members that runoff won’t be a problem – but he thinks it will flood his garden.

David says ambient lighting is also a problem – comparing it to Friday night football in their backyard.

Another concern for the neighbors is that property values ​​will drop dramatically.

Karen and Dennis Noltee have been residents for 36 years.

“What if a three story project were to be built within ten feet of their property line – how would they vote? And I’m afraid that’s not what they’ll have in mind when they vote, ”says Karen.

“I just don’t think we should all pay the price for destroying our neighborhood and having a huge building built in our backyards,” she adds.

Neighbors plan to make their voices heard at the next hearing on the project before a decision is made at the January 3 city council meeting.

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Westminster Farm to become home to 2,350 Uplands homes https://sadc-tribunal.org/westminster-farm-to-become-home-to-2350-uplands-homes/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 23:57:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/westminster-farm-to-become-home-to-2350-uplands-homes/ [ad_1] This story first appeared in a Colorado Community Media newspaper. The Colorado Sun owns CCM. By Luc Zarzecki, The Westminster Window After three long nights of debate and testimony, Westminster City Council voted 5-2 to approve the controversial plan to convert a large swath of farmland into a 2,350 Uplands housing development. Councilors voted […]]]>


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This story first appeared in a Colorado Community Media newspaper. The Colorado Sun owns CCM.

By Luc Zarzecki, The Westminster Window

After three long nights of debate and testimony, Westminster City Council voted 5-2 to approve the controversial plan to convert a large swath of farmland into a 2,350 Uplands housing development.

Councilors voted at the end of their meeting on Monday, which went on until nearly 1 a.m. Tuesday and was greeted with boos from some residents and members of Save the Farm, the group opposed to development.

The advisers, however, imposed conditions on the approval. These included: requiring the developer to pay 100% of the cost of all water, sanitary, storm sewer and other public infrastructure required on and off site; the inclusion of signs in development parks clearly indicating that they are intended for the general public; a requirement that at least 300 low income rental units be built; and the creation of a special fund dedicated to the construction of parks within the development using the money from the developer’s cash payments from public land use.

Those who voted in favor included Councilors David DeMott, Sarah Nurmela, Lindsey Smith, Rich Seymour and Mayor Nancy McNally.

Councilors Obi Ezeadi and Bruce Baker opposed it.

Developer Oread Capital wanted City Council to let them continue work on the project, which is designed to convert the large open space surrounding the church into Uplands, a sprawling mixed-use development, with housing options ranging from single-family homes to apartments. and townhouses as well as parks and shopping areas. The project would take several years to complete, eventually accommodating 2,350 housing units in a mix of housing types.

PLUS: Who are the parks for? The proposed housing development has neighbors in Westminster fighting for space.

Neighbors in the Shaw Heights neighborhood, many of whom opposed the plan, wanted the town to say no and keep the lot, known to them as Farm, undeveloped.

“It’s all I’ve ever known,” said John Palmer, who said he has lived in Westminster his entire life, most within sight of the farm.

For more on this story, visit westminsterwindow.com


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DC’s Chevy Chase neighborhood seeks to reverse its history of exclusion https://sadc-tribunal.org/dcs-chevy-chase-neighborhood-seeks-to-reverse-its-history-of-exclusion/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 16:47:13 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/dcs-chevy-chase-neighborhood-seeks-to-reverse-its-history-of-exclusion/ [ad_1] The Avalon Theater on Connecticut Avenue NW in Chevy Chase by Toasted Cheese under a Creative Commons license. In search of how DC’s exclusive Chevy Chase neighborhood might approach racial equity, some community members are creating a more inclusive vision for the neighborhood with the launch of the Chevy Chase DC Small Area plan […]]]>


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The Avalon Theater on Connecticut Avenue NW in Chevy Chase by Toasted Cheese under a Creative Commons license.

In search of how DC’s exclusive Chevy Chase neighborhood might approach racial equity, some community members are creating a more inclusive vision for the neighborhood with the launch of the Chevy Chase DC Small Area plan by the DC Office of Planning . With the help of the ANC and community groups like Ward3Vision, this effort has the potential to draft a master plan for a more inclusive neighborhood while revitalizing its main street. The resulting plan could accommodate a range of hundreds of new homes and residents, including low-income residents.

Small Area Plans are local plans that complement the Global Plan, DC’s 20-year framework that guides future growth and development. In May 2021, DC council passed major changes to the overall plan, including proposed land use changes that would help meet the district’s ambitious housing production targets with the goal of making housing more affordable. . Chevy Chase’s Small Area Plan is intended to provide more detailed guidance for these land use changes and to align “with the city’s priorities for housing production, economic recovery, fairness and racial justice, ”according to the Planning Bureau.

New homes in Chevy Chase for new residents at a range of incomes would be a welcome departure from a long history of exclusivity and segregation. The plan’s study area, which has not seen new housing in decades and lacks dedicated affordable housing, is in an affluent neighborhood with sought-after public schools. Lack of new and affordable housing is the norm for Ward 3, where Chevy Chase is located, which, according to the Comprehensive Plan update, contains only 1% of the district’s affordable housing stock.

The limited number of homes in the area drives up the price of existing homes and pushes growth elsewhere. It also maintains long-standing patterns of segregation: Today, white residents make up 77% of the population, while 6% are black (in contrast, about half of DC residents are throughout the Black District).

The small area planning process began at Chevy Chase in the spring of 2020 with a series of community outreach sessions and surveys to establish a draft vision and goals for the plan. Now the Planning Office is holding a series of community walks in December, followed by a charrette (community design brainstorming workshop) in January 2022. A draft plan is expected to be ready in March 2022, with an audience mayor’s in April and a review by DC Council in summer.

The plan had its skeptics. The concern was that after all the meetings and engagement, would the plan deviate from the status quo? After decades of little new development and no dedicated affordable housing, in an environment historically hostile to all change, could any planning effort succeed?

In 2019, Randy Speck, president of the 3 / 4G ANC which represents the region, led a task force to review proposed changes to the overall plan, including changes that would allow modest increases in density along from Connecticut Avenue south to Chevy Chase Circle. After months of sometimes controversial discussions, the task force recommended that the ANC support the increase in density provided that a small area plan studies the impact on the built environment of the community as well as on the services such as schools.

Then, the murder of George Floyd in May 2020 sparked widespread outrage against racial justice. The Chevy Chase ANC quickly formed a task force on racism. Speck chaired a task force that examined housing issues with the aim of “reversing the exclusionary housing practices of the past by encouraging a variety of housing options that will be achievable for residents with a wider range. of income and origins ”.

The full ANC watered down some of the key recommendations, but the need to plan for a greater diversity of housing options was widely discussed and supported in virtual meetings and on neighborhood mailing lists that once only featured messages. anti-development. Opposition to any new development, including new housing, is still part of the discussion, but more progressive voices are being heard.

With this new emphasis on fairness, Chevy Chase’s planning effort has the potential to benefit from inputs beyond the usual suspects of well-to-do, mostly white, longtime owners. To broaden the scope of the public engagement process, ANC 3 / 4G conducted “information exchanges” in the fall of 2020. At a session in September, Commissioner Connie Chang brought together three living residents in Chevy Chase apartment buildings to get their perspective and how they’d like to see the neighborhood change. One of the residents who spoke spoke about how the district’s inclusive affordable housing zoning program helped him find an apartment in Chevy Chase, a neighborhood he loved to live in.

The session put a face to residents who might be living in new buildings that many believe would be “incompatible with the character of the neighborhood.” All participants said that the only way they can afford to live in this neighborhood of multi-million dollar single-family homes is with the limited availability of apartments and condominiums.

A bold vision for Chevy Chase

The small area planning effort is also getting a boost from the local Ward3Vision volunteer group, who presented their own urban design plan (Ward3Vision is a partner of my organization, the Coalition for Smarter Growth, and I reviewed and gave my opinion on the plan). At an event hosted by Historic Chevy Chase DC on October 6, Ward 3 resident Matt Bell, professor of architecture at the University of Maryland and director of urban design firm Perkins Eastman, presented a design concept urban 30-year-old on behalf of Ward3Vision.

A vision for Chevy Chase, DC by Ward3Vision used with permission.

According to Bell, although the vitality of the retail business has been challenged by recent events, many residents have expressed a desire for more local businesses and engaging civic spaces. Bell suggested planning more residents who can walk to and patronize local businesses.

The Ward3Vision plan notes four goals that emerged from the Planning Office’s community outreach to create a vision to guide the plan: quality of life, neighborhood architectural character, environmental sustainability, and social equity. Their plan suggests tactics to achieve these goals include new buildings along the east side of the avenue and the north end near the Chevy Chase Circle on the Maryland border. The existing community center and library can be redeveloped with affordable housing, and inclusion zoning can add affordable housing to other sites.

In his presentation, Bell explained how, in the main streets, buildings define the public domain and must include elements on a human scale. Historic structures like the Avalon Theater and the Chevy Chase Arcade building should be preserved, and the charming traditional streetscapes of Main Street that contribute to the character of the community should be preserved. The group’s plans show how a mix of apartment buildings and townhouses can fit into the neighborhood to shape a more walkable public realm and create a variety of new housing choices for many families who would love to. live at Chevy Chase.

The public presentation was well received by many attendees, but the usual questions were asked – what about the height of the building, the parking lot and the capacity of the school? Bell suggested that the parking lot would be largely underground and that the heights of the buildings would be lower than those already existing on Connecticut Avenue. Regarding schools, he noted that single-family homes generate significantly more school-aged children than multi-family buildings, but the district should address capacity issues. Former Planning Director Ellen McCarthy, another Ward3Vision member also present at the event, said school overcrowding is an issue to be addressed, but should not be a reason to ignore housing needs in the city. region.

Ron Eichner, also of Ward3Vision, estimated that a full build would include around 230 affordable housing units and around 500 other units. About 100 new affordable houses could be built as part of a joint development project with the community center / library, and the rest of the affordable houses could come from IZ units as part of a private development.

Eichner said the small area plan should include design guidelines for ground floors to avoid hostile blank walls like those at CVS and Safeway, as well as a public space plan that examines how to shoot. making full use of the wide sidewalks, how to create civic space along the avenue, and how to accommodate buses, bicycles and pedestrians. A programming and management plan for Connecticut Avenue, supporting activities like a farmers market or sidewalk art shows, would be welcome.

The Chevy Chase DC Small Area Plan area is small – a few blocks from Connecticut Avenue below the Chevy Chase Circle. This is a reduced scale compared to the simultaneous planning efforts of small areas east of the Anacostia River. But despite the low geographic focus of the Chevy Chase plan and its no-growth baseline, its potential is significant. Ward 3 has a history of unsuccessful attempts to plan for more housing and more affordable housing – from the 2008 mixed-income housing plan taped above the Tenley Library (where the library was rebuilt without the 174 units of housing provided above, including 53 affordable units) to the abandoned 2003 Upper Wisconsin Avenue Corridor Study which suggested 10-story buildings between Tenleytown and Friendship Heights. The Chevy Chase DC plan could signal a reversal of those past failures, resulting in a generational shift from exclusion to inclusion, from a self-centered suburban past to an urban, greener and more equitable future.

To have your say in the future of Chevy Chase and the people who live there, participate in the upcoming Chevy Chase Small Area Plan Community Walks.

Cheryl Cort is Policy Director for the Coalition for Smarter Growth. She works with community activists, nonprofit groups and policy makers to promote more walking, cycling, inclusive, and transit-oriented communities as the most sustainable and equitable way for the DC region to thrive. develop and provide opportunities for all.

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District using geothermal technology to become net zero https://sadc-tribunal.org/district-using-geothermal-technology-to-become-net-zero/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 21:33:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/district-using-geothermal-technology-to-become-net-zero/ [ad_1] ARVADA, Colorado – To tackle the climate crisis, engineers are turning to new, eco-friendly housing. A community has created a neighborhood powered by solar and geothermal technology. This is called the Geos neighborhood located in Arvada, and it is one of the greenest areas in the country. “Geos stands for Geosolar,” said Norbert Klebl, […]]]>


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ARVADA, Colorado – To tackle the climate crisis, engineers are turning to new, eco-friendly housing. A community has created a neighborhood powered by solar and geothermal technology.

This is called the Geos neighborhood located in Arvada, and it is one of the greenest areas in the country.

“Geos stands for Geosolar,” said Norbert Klebl, the designer of Geos Neighborhood. “Right now we have 30 houses that are completed and occupied. The neighborhood is unique because before calculating the need for solar capacity, we focused on the actual energy needs for heating and cooling these houses.

Geos Neighborhood seeks to be a global example of green energy, being a totally net zero community, where homes produce enough energy for the year with renewable energies.

“We use ground source heat pumps for single family homes,” Klebl said. “And we use solar panels for the houses to produce the needs of the houses.”

In addition to solar panels on each roof, Klebl included energy efficient washers and dryers, triple-glazed windows for insulation, and charging stations for electric vehicles.

However, one of the impressive technologies that he included is the ground source heat pump.

“A lot of people know the sun above our heads, but they don’t know what the equivalent of the sun is beneath our feet,” said Dar Lon Chang, one of the residents of Geos district.

Chang moved to the area in 2019 and wants others to consider lifestyles like the Geos Quarter to help the environment.

“The core of the earth has the same temperature as the surface of the sun,” Chang said. “Geothermal energy takes advantage of the fact that heat from the earth’s core radiates to the surface. If you drill six or seven feet deep, the temperature is fairly stable throughout the year. It’s stable here at 57 degrees Fahrenheit. You can use it as a tank for heating in winter and cooling your house in summer.

A rapid reduction in methane emissions is key to tackling the climate crisis, according to an IPCC report from August 2021. The report says methane is a greenhouse gas 80 times more potent than carbon dioxide and is widely used to fuel stoves and heat homes in the United States.

Klebl hopes its geothermal and energy-clean district could be the future of housing.

“Thirty percent of all greenhouse gases are produced by homes,” Klebl said. “And to eliminate that, we have to do what we did: reduce the need for energy and find more efficient ways to generate energy.”

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