square feet – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ Sun, 17 Apr 2022 18:51:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sadc-tribunal.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/favicon-1.png square feet – SADC Tribunal http://sadc-tribunal.org/ 32 32 Living in Swarthmore: A Guide to the Swarthmore Neighborhood https://sadc-tribunal.org/living-in-swarthmore-a-guide-to-the-swarthmore-neighborhood/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 15:21:39 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/living-in-swarthmore-a-guide-to-the-swarthmore-neighborhood/ guides This close-knit community has a personality heavily influenced by the college that changed it in 1864. Get a captivating long read and must-have lifestyle tips delivered to your inbox every Sunday morning – great with a coffee! Photograph by Jeff Fusco The city a college makes Originally named Westdale for its most famous native, […]]]>

guides

This close-knit community has a personality heavily influenced by the college that changed it in 1864.


Photograph by Jeff Fusco

The city a college makes

Originally named Westdale for its most famous native, painter Benjamin West, Swarthmore became Swarthmore when Quakers founded Swarthmore College in 1864. The borough – incorporated in 1893 – was built entirely in the 1930s, according to the aficionado of the Scott Laughlin Historic Home of BHHS Fox & Gardon.

…be done

The borough’s social life changed for the better when the college-built Swarthmore Hostel (10 South Chester Road) opened across Chester Road from the city center in 2016. The hotel of 40 rooms includes the Broad Table Tavern restaurant and bar that holds the borough’s first liquor license. “The hostel has done a great job of integrating the college into the community,” says Becky Hanson, a longtime Swarthmorean who is an agent for D. Patrick Welsh Real Estate (16 Park Avenue), founded and owned by her husband.

Historic houses, university atmosphere

Many of Swarthmore’s faculty call Swarthmore home, although rising property prices threaten to drive some of them out of town. The borough definitely has an academic vibe: streets are named after other colleges and universities, and the Swarthmore Public Library (121 Park Avenue) has the highest per capita usage of any library in Delaware County. Outside of pandemic times, residents can also borrow books from Swarthmore College libraries for an annual fee of $20. Swarthmore’s housing stock is rich in a variety of styles.

Working together for good (food)

The city, long a liberal island in a (more) conservative county, is also home to the third-oldest cooperative grocery store in the country. The Swarthmore Co-Op (341 Dartmouth Avenue), which began as a health food outlet in Hanson’s grandmother’s basement in 1932, offers a full line of groceries.

What you get for…

$250,000+

204 Michigan Ave. / Photo courtesy of Thato Dadson

204 Michigan Avenue. A classic, well-maintained 1950’s duplex with an enclosed back porch and side deck, ready to move into or ready to upgrade – your choice. 3 BR, 1/1 BA, 1,540 square feet. RE/MAX Hometown, 610-566-1340.

$500,000+

207 Riverview Road. / Photography courtesy of William Breish / Real T Photography

207 Riverview Road. This remodeled twin features a two-bedroom apartment above its detached garage, so your tenants can pay your mortgage for you. 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1,825 square feet. Keller Williams Real Estate, 610-363-4300.

$800,000+

2 Chester Road North. / Photo courtesy of BHHS Fox Roach Realtors

2 Chester Road North. A rare new build home next to the regional train station gives you the flexibility to choose layouts, finishes and fittings. 4 BR, 2/1 BA, 2,750 sq. ft. BHHS Fox & Roach Realtors, 610-431-1100.

Published as “Living in Swarthmore” in the February 2022 issue ofphiladelphia cream magazine



]]>
Newmark facilitates the sale of a multi-family development site in the Hawthorne neighborhood of South Bay https://sadc-tribunal.org/newmark-facilitates-the-sale-of-a-multi-family-development-site-in-the-hawthorne-neighborhood-of-south-bay/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 21:15:21 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/newmark-facilitates-the-sale-of-a-multi-family-development-site-in-the-hawthorne-neighborhood-of-south-bay/ Newmark 1 announces that it has completed the sale of Millennium Gardena, a full-fledged development site planned for 262 multi-family units and located at 12850 Crenshaw Boulevard in the South Bay neighborhood of Hawthorne, California. Chris Benton, Newmark’s Senior Managing Director, Anthony Muhlstein, Managing Director, Kevin Shannon, Co-Head of Capital Markets, and Ken White, Executive […]]]>

Newmark 1 announces that it has completed the sale of Millennium Gardena, a full-fledged development site planned for 262 multi-family units and located at 12850 Crenshaw Boulevard in the South Bay neighborhood of Hawthorne, California.

Chris Benton, Newmark’s Senior Managing Director, Anthony Muhlstein, Managing Director, Kevin Shannon, Co-Head of Capital Markets, and Ken White, Executive Managing Director, represented the seller, The Dinerstein Companies. The buyer was a joint venture between Cityview and Stockbridge.

The sustainability-focused multi-family building planned for the site will be called South Bay X and will feature a mix of bachelor, one- and two-bedroom units ranging from 510 to 1,197 square feet. It is expected to start during the fourth quarter of 2022 with an expected delivery in early 2025. Sustainable features planned for the building include LEED Silver certification, high performance lighting, improved indoor air quality and a solar thermal system. powered by renewable energy. water heating system. Building amenities will include a state-of-the-art fitness center, resort-style swimming pool, spa, lanai, outdoor weight area, barbecue grills and outdoor courtyards.

“South Bay is an undersupplied, multi-family market adjacent to some of LA’s biggest tech companies,” Benton said. “With extremely strong multifamily market fundamentals across the region, the buyer’s plan to build sustainable, market-priced homes will be well received.”

Muhlstein added, “Millennium Gardena will be a great addition to an underserved apartment market with top local employers such as Ring and SpaceX.”

Millennium Gardena’s location in the fast-growing South Bay neighborhood provides convenient access to the area’s diverse mix of technology, aerospace and e-commerce employers, including Tesla, SpaceX and Ring, just a stone’s throw away. side of the property. The site is less than a mile from Interstate 105 and just five miles from Interstates 405 and 110. The transit-oriented location is two blocks from the LA Metro Green Line and less than five miles from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX).

“Major global technology, aerospace, automotive and e-commerce companies are relocating to this South Bay community, making it the perfect time for Cityview and Stockbridge to implement our shared vision to bring new jobs and to build quality, quality labor-based housing at market price. this undersupplied market,” Cityview CEO Sean Burton said in a prepared statement. “We both look forward to being part of the revitalization efforts taking place in this area and to providing more sustainable living options for our residents.

U.S. multifamily investment sales volume hit an all-time high of $148.9 billion during the fourth quarter of 2021, according to Newmark Research. Annual sales volume hit a record high of $335.3 billion, a year-on-year increase of 128.2%. Investment as a percentage of the entire U.S. commercial real estate market rose to 41.5% in 2021, the highest allocation ever to multifamily real estate. Absorption jumped to 673,478 units in 2021, far exceeding new supply of 358,734 units. Strong demand over the past 12 months in Los Angeles, New York and Washington, DC is an encouraging sign of momentum in major markets with limited supply.

(Visited 1 time, 6 visits today)

]]>
Santa Rosa’s Roseland neighborhood set to welcome brand new $17 million Boys and Girls Club https://sadc-tribunal.org/santa-rosas-roseland-neighborhood-set-to-welcome-brand-new-17-million-boys-and-girls-club/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 03:36:23 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/santa-rosas-roseland-neighborhood-set-to-welcome-brand-new-17-million-boys-and-girls-club/ In a large field of dirt opposite Roseland Primary School on Sebastopol Road, a dusty and orange Kubota mini digger was digging holes and trenches on Tuesday for the foundation of what will be the first boys and girls club to be built in Santa Rosa for decades. Orange, white, and green lines painted on […]]]>

In a large field of dirt opposite Roseland Primary School on Sebastopol Road, a dusty and orange Kubota mini digger was digging holes and trenches on Tuesday for the foundation of what will be the first boys and girls club to be built in Santa Rosa for decades.

Orange, white, and green lines painted on the earth outline the building’s footprint of approximately 25,000 square feet and $17 million. It will include a full-size gym, commercial kitchen, art and science/technology lab, dance studio, teen center and more.

David Bowman, a board member of the umbrella organization Boys & Girls Clubs of Sonoma-Marin, said the project is a long time coming for a community that has been largely neglected for many years.

“It’s a true testament to a community that deserves something,” Bowman said. “It’s something sorely lacking – shame on all of us that we didn’t get something like this in this community much sooner.”

The organization has four other sites in the Roseland neighborhood of Santa Rosa, all on school campuses. It once had a fifth site in a nearby structure that housed COVID-19 testing and vaccinations and was the former site of the Roseland Library.

The new Boys & Girls Clubs site sits just west of the planned Tierra de Rosas development, a long-awaited 7.4-acre neighborhood center that will include affordable, market-priced housing, a public plaza, center community and a market hall and restaurant business incubator.

The completion of this project is still several years away. Bowman said he hopes the new Roseland Boys & Girls Club will also serve as a community center and a gathering place for local residents, who are primarily Latino. While the focus will be on free services for young people, club facilities will be open to people of all ages, he said.

Maria Peñoloza, a mother of three girls – two fourth graders and a first grader – said she relies on the Boys & Girls Club at Sheppard Elementary to watch her children after school while she is at work , cleaning homes and offices. She said her children had been in the program for four years and the staff often helped them with their homework.

“I don’t know what I would do if I didn’t have this club,” she said in Spanish. “I guess I should figure out how to pick up my kids after school, maybe rely on other people while I’m at work. At the club, they are safe. I have nothing but good things to say about their staff.

Boys and Girls Clubs of Sonoma-Marin has 40 locations in Sonoma County, including two dozen in Santa Rosa, serving some 3,000 children daily and about 10,000 children total each year. That’s a significant increase from the 300 children the organization served in three county locations 14 years ago, said Jennifer Weiss, CEO of the group.

On Tuesday, Weiss surveyed the dirt lot, indicating where the various construction facilities would soon materialize. “That’s the entrance, and that’s the dance studio on our left,” she said. “This truck is sitting on the art room.”

The full-size gym will likely operate day and night, and the commercial kitchen will not only serve meals for children but also have enough space to be used as a learning center for nutrition programs, Weiss said.

“There are so many kids to serve, we’re just trying to keep up,” she said.

Weiss said the club needed to raise $10 million to complete construction. The project was launched just before the pandemic in 2019 with a $1,450,000 grant from Sonoma County Vintners, the local business group.

The property was purchased with a $1 million donation from Cindy and Bill Gallaher, whose construction company designed the project and will build it.

The couple also donated another million dollars for the project, and their construction company reduced the cost of construction by $1.65 million, Weiss said.

The Gallahers, the Boys & Girls Club’s biggest backer, in 2021 backed out of a previous promise to pay the full cost of the project, about $16 million at the time, according to club officials.

To raise the $10 million needed for construction, the club has five years – the period of the 1.5% interest loan the organization secured through Santa Rosa-based Poppy Bank, of which Bill Gallaher is the founder and chairman of the board of directors.

The bank also contributed $100,000 to the project, Weiss said.

Bowman said programs run by the Roseland-based club serve 900 children. When completed, the new club will help serve 2,500 area children.

“It’s a company that’s been talked about for years,” he said. “Communities like this yearn for things that other communities have.”

The Boys & Girls Clubs of Sonoma-Marin, with annual revenues of approximately $10 million, receives 75% of its funding from federal and state grants supporting after-school services. The other quarter comes from donations and charitable donations, Weiss said.

Weiss said it will be a challenge both to raise the funds needed to repay the building loan and to continue club operations at 40 venues across the county. Much will depend on the local community, she said.

Many families at the club have been hit hard by the pandemic, including disproportionate rates of illness and death in local Latino households, as well as severe economic hardship.

“There are a lot of things adults in the community need to do to try to restore the emotional well-being of the children we serve,” she said.

You can reach editor Martin Espinoza at 707-521-5213 or martin.espinoza@pressdemocrat.com. On Twitter @pressreno.

]]>
Best low-profile design of 2021: A mid-market pocket quarter https://sadc-tribunal.org/best-low-profile-design-of-2021-a-mid-market-pocket-quarter/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 22:53:21 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/best-low-profile-design-of-2021-a-mid-market-pocket-quarter/ Baby boomers are generally expected to want to live in retirement homes that offer social connection, purpose, and commitment, all at an affordable price. A new senior living concept added to a 346-unit Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) Lutheran Homes of South Carolina offers all of the above. The community is Heritage at Lowman in […]]]>

Baby boomers are generally expected to want to live in retirement homes that offer social connection, purpose, and commitment, all at an affordable price.

A new senior living concept added to a 346-unit Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) Lutheran Homes of South Carolina offers all of the above.

The community is Heritage at Lowman in Chapin, South Carolina; and the project is a pocket neighborhood concept known as The Courtyards at Lowman. With 20 compact homes arranged around a shared green space, the new addition is the latest example of the growing trend of pocket neighborhoods for seniors.

RLPS Architects’ design featured open one- and two-bedroom floor plans designed to let in natural light while making the most of the compact space. The community also has outdoor facilities and a lawn to strengthen social ties between residents.

This helped the avant-garde pocket neighborhood take first place in the “Best Small Footprint” category of the 2021 Senior Housing News Architecture & Design Awards, which was a new addition to this year’s competition.

The concept

Planning for The Courtyards at Lowman began in 2018, when Lutheran Homes of South Carolina President and CEO Frank Shepke was studying the small home movement with great interest.

Shepke envisioned a self-contained living addition that would provide both affordability and a sense of community for residents. He also wanted to add a rental component to CCRC to diversify his campus and meet the demand of potential residents. As he looked at different tiny home designs and concepts, something clicked.

“We literally put this on the back of a napkin and kind of sketched it out, and started looking at what it might look like if we were able to pull all these concepts together,” Shepke told Senior Housing News.

Shortly after, the company brought in RLPS Architects to work on the project. The company had been involved in similar pocket neighborhood concepts, including at Rose Villa, a life plan community based in Portland, Oregon, according to partner Eric McRoberts.

From the outset, CCRC and RLPS set out to create a pocket-sized neighborhood that was both mid-market fit while providing privacy and opportunities for residents to mingle in shared spaces.

The project was designed as two pocket neighborhoods consisting of 10 houses each. The two pocket quarters are arranged around a common green space made up of a synthetic turf that stays green all year round and does not require typical lawn maintenance.

One of the first challenges was determining the size of each unit. A typical senior housing unit is between 900 and 1,500 square feet, but designers needed to limit the pocket neighborhood dwellings to a smaller footprint in order to meet project goals.

“The challenge for us as a design team was how to build a smaller unit while making it look bigger than it actually is?” McRoberts said.

To help meet this challenge, RLPS designed the Pocket Neighborhood Units with open floor plans, features that let in natural light, and higher ceilings. Each home was designed with a unique porch overlooking the social area and courtyard as well as a more private back porch where residents can relax. The houses also have varying rooflines to keep them from looking too uniform.

“These had to have some sense of individuality for it to work, so that a potential resident would say, ‘Yeah, that’s my unit right there,'” Shepke said.

The courses at Lowman are also connected to the larger CCRC by trails, and all homes have been designed to have space in the back to store and charge a golf cart.

building

Construction of the community began in early 2019, with McCrory Construction as the project’s general contractor.

Located near the community wellness center and on a site with difficult elevation, the early stages of the project required “a good piece of land that needed to be moved,” Shepke recalls.

Bad weather and water attenuation was another challenge, as was connecting the walkways to the community at large. And like many other senior living projects underway at this time, the Covid-19 pandemic also posed a significant challenge in 2020, particularly with regard to the supply chain and social distancing on site.

In the end, construction was only slightly delayed, with a completion date of October 2020. But overall construction went and finished smoothly and on budget .

Completion

Now open, The Courtyards at Lowman sits at the crossroads between pocket neighborhood and mid-market trends.

One of the Pocket Neighborhood’s selling points is its monthly rental rates, which range between $2,420 and $3,141. To keep rates at a relatively mid-price level, in-stock residential custodial services were used in all accommodation kitchens and bathrooms. In total, the community reached its total project budget of $5 million.

“We were trying to get a price below $150 a square foot,” McRoberts said. “With our first phase, I think we were able to reach that or come very close to that.”

]]>
Rexburg man hopes to build housing estate in Idaho Falls neighborhood https://sadc-tribunal.org/rexburg-man-hopes-to-build-housing-estate-in-idaho-falls-neighborhood/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 16:36:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/rexburg-man-hopes-to-build-housing-estate-in-idaho-falls-neighborhood/ CLARIFICATION: An earlier version of this story said it was an affordable housing development. The term “affordable” was intended to explain the designer’s idea that this was low cost housing, not low rental housing. After further explanation from the designer, we have since learned that the project will be based on current market prices. We […]]]>

CLARIFICATION: An earlier version of this story said it was an affordable housing development. The term “affordable” was intended to explain the designer’s idea that this was low cost housing, not low rental housing. After further explanation from the designer, we have since learned that the project will be based on current market prices. We apologize for the confusion.

IDAHO FALLS – A 2.75 acre parcel of land along Woodruff Avenue in Idaho Falls may soon be the site of an affordable housing development.

For several years, Josh Ruby, originally from Rexburg, has worked to build a planned community that bypasses the traditional road-buying route.

His original proposal included 12 1,300 square foot homes on a 2 acre parcel inside the Old Farm Estates subdivision of Sugar City with an option to add amenities, such as an indoor pickleball court, carpentry, a gym, rooms and pool / spa. /sauna.

The idea was to create a sense of community and save money for the owner by allowing him to invest in the project and design and build the houses themselves rather than hiring a third party.

RELATED | Man seeks to create affordable housing community in Sugar City

The project was in its early stages in April 2020 but it never seemed to gain momentum.

Recently, Ruby identified a ground directly behind Winco that he said would be a perfect fit for a modified version of his idea.

In a conversation with EastIdahoNews.com, he explained several reasons why the property is ideal for his project.

“It borders an open space that will never be developed because it is owned by a utility company, so we’ll always have a soccer field next to us… to add green space,” Ruby explains.

He also likes that the city walking trail passes right past the property and is in an uncomfortable location.

“It reduces the value of the land,” he says. “If this was a more prominent location that would be more suitable for a commercial building or a (traditional) residential development, it probably would have already been done. “

An artistic rendering of one of Ruby’s houses. | Josh ruby

The new model includes a total of 15 different homes of varying sizes, including three 360-square-foot smaller homes, six 1,300-square-foot homes, two 1,500-square-foot homes, two 2,000-square-foot homes, and two smaller homes. 2,600 square feet.

The housing project would also include storage rooms and a community building with all the amenities of the first proposal.

“I’m going to design the spec plan and then pre-sell it (before it’s built),” says Ruby.

Ruby meets with investors to determine a market price for her subdivision. While he originally hoped to offer them at a much lower rate, he says the cost will now be based on current market prices.

Although Ruby negotiated with the landowner to buy the property, it never went up for sale. He says it’s unlikely to be sold to someone else, which gives him more time to work on his design.

It is also county-owned and will need to be annexed to the city before Ruby can do anything with it.

Ruby is working on finalizing his digital renderings of the project so that he can present his proposal to the public and get feedback from the community. He tentatively plans a presentation in February.

He would like to innovate on the project this spring, depending on the number of investors and the public interest. Visit Ruby’s website to learn more. You can also contact him by email at jlrubybusiness@gmail.com.

]]>
UWS townhouse asking for $ 30 million is said to be the most expensive in the neighborhood https://sadc-tribunal.org/uws-townhouse-asking-for-30-million-is-said-to-be-the-most-expensive-in-the-neighborhood/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 21:22:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/uws-townhouse-asking-for-30-million-is-said-to-be-the-most-expensive-in-the-neighborhood/ [ad_1] From left to right: Ileana Lopez-Balboa from Corcoran and Charlie Attias from Compass in front of 248 Central Park West (Corcoran, Compass, StreetEasy) The buyer of a historic Upper West Side home may soon own the most expensive townhouse in the neighborhood. A townhouse at 248 Central Park West asking for $ 30 million […]]]>


[ad_1]

From left to right: Ileana Lopez-Balboa from Corcoran and Charlie Attias from Compass in front of 248 Central Park West (Corcoran, Compass, StreetEasy)

The buyer of a historic Upper West Side home may soon own the most expensive townhouse in the neighborhood.

A townhouse at 248 Central Park West asking for $ 30 million was closed this week, by Compass. If the sale goes through, that would make the property the most expensive townhouse sold on the Upper West Side, according to valuation firm Miller Samuel.

The last time the home attempted to sell for that price was in 2018, when Michael Sieger, a brokerage firm with Sotheby’s International Realty, attempted to market the home for $ 29 million, The New York Times reported. The home was taken down and put back on the market, ultimately selling for $ 16.25 million in 2019, according to property records.

Two years and an ongoing pandemic later, the housing market has changed – and so has the house. The newly renovated home was listed by Corcoran in mid-September for $ 30 million. Less than three months later, a buyer was ready to sign the fine print.

Charlie Attias of Compass, who represented the anonymous buyer, said the sale was proof that the Upper West Side “is a pretty healthy market.” He postulated that the deal would set a neighborhood benchmark that would boost more broken records in the future.

Covering nearly 10,000 square feet, the six-story home has six bedrooms, though the layout can be reconfigured to accommodate up to eight. It has seven full baths and two half baths, as well as a 1,875 square foot wellness center with a heated swimming pool, jacuzzi, sauna and hydrotherapy steam shower and massage.

The house has undergone extensive renovations over the past two years, using environmentally friendly and non-toxic materials. Other features include a virtual doorman, a new security system and a dehumidification system.

The house is one of the last three single-family homes on the avenue and was built by developer William Noble in 1887. Throughout its 134-year history were the parents of Generals Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant , who visited the wealthy colonel who owned the house in the years following the Civil War.

Ileana Lopez-Balboa of Corcoran represented the vendor. Corcoran declined to comment for this story.

[ad_2]

]]>
Local Foods and Neighborhood Improvement Identified as Top Priorities for Use of Fifth Street Properties | Local news https://sadc-tribunal.org/local-foods-and-neighborhood-improvement-identified-as-top-priorities-for-use-of-fifth-street-properties-local-news/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 17:45:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/local-foods-and-neighborhood-improvement-identified-as-top-priorities-for-use-of-fifth-street-properties-local-news/ [ad_1] SHERIDAN – Sheridan County School District 2 does not have immediate plans for the Fifth Street Holly Seed property acquired earlier this year, but the next steps have been taken to determine what the site may house in the future. As a result of private and public community outreach, respondents determined that local food […]]]>


[ad_1]

SHERIDAN – Sheridan County School District 2 does not have immediate plans for the Fifth Street Holly Seed property acquired earlier this year, but the next steps have been taken to determine what the site may house in the future.

As a result of private and public community outreach, respondents determined that local food and neighborhood improvement were the property’s top priorities, followed closely by economic development and youth sports and activities, according to community-wide assessment.

Community stakeholders developed the top four priorities, and community outreach identified the top priorities. Trustees also worked with local grant writer Susan Bigelow to identify grant opportunities.

Deputy superintendent of program and evaluation, Mitch Craft, said Bigelow suggested that the capital construction committee first clarify the vision for the project, then connect with partners and seek planning funds. She identified possible grants through the United States Department of Agriculture focused on rural development or farm-to-school projects. Bigelow also suggested charcoal-affected community grants, although most USDA grants must be supported by a community partner and not withheld by a school district alone.

The district accepted a $ 1.4 million donation from Homer “Scotty” and Janet Scott in February to purchase the nearly 7.8-acre former Holly Seed home along Fifth Street and in next to Sheridan High School.

The property consists of up to five structures, including a main building with offices, a 4000 square foot store, a laboratory and three greenhouses. The space is zoned commercial with allowances for education.

Commercial zoning limits four-story building heights to 45 feet tall. The largest single building structure that could be constructed on the site is approximately 82,000 square feet. A rendering of the property showed the potential capacity of the space housing an 82,000 square foot building with existing buildings in place.

No next step was proposed at the SCSD2 board meeting on Monday.

Ashleigh Snoozy joined The Sheridan Press in October 2016 as a reporter before assuming the role of editor in November 2018. She is originally from Colorado and graduated from Biola University in Los Angeles.

[ad_2]

]]>
Customer opinion | Madison Heights Neighborhood Association Board of Directors: Thanking and Continuing to Protect Historic Pasadena Architecture – Pasadena Now https://sadc-tribunal.org/customer-opinion-madison-heights-neighborhood-association-board-of-directors-thanking-and-continuing-to-protect-historic-pasadena-architecture-pasadena-now/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 01:45:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/customer-opinion-madison-heights-neighborhood-association-board-of-directors-thanking-and-continuing-to-protect-historic-pasadena-architecture-pasadena-now/ [ad_1] “The Pasadena in which we live and from which we enjoy is the gift of past generations, a particularly fortunate creation born of a judicious choice and a thoughtful construction in a striking environmental setting …” – Katie Harp McLane, co-founder of Pasadena Heritage On Thanksgiving, the Madison Heights Neighborhood Association (MHNA) would like […]]]>


[ad_1]

“The Pasadena in which we live and from which we enjoy is the gift of past generations, a particularly fortunate creation born of a judicious choice and a thoughtful construction in a striking environmental setting …”

– Katie Harp McLane, co-founder of Pasadena Heritage

On Thanksgiving, the Madison Heights Neighborhood Association (MHNA) would like to thank all of those in Pasadena who have worked tirelessly over the years to preserve the beauty and charm that makes Pasadena the city we love. We especially want to thank the local activists who in the 1970s-80s saved the historic buildings of Old Pasadena from the wrecking ball. People like Katie Harp McLane, Claire Boggard, Bill Ellinger and John Merritt, who together founded Pasadena Heritage, and Sue Mossman, its current longtime executive director.

Each generation of Pasadenans plays their part in preserving the aesthetics that make Pasadena one of the most unique and charming cities in the state. SB9 (State Senate Bill 9) now adds urgency to our generation’s call to preserve historic architecture from demolition.

The MHNA has long worked to protect Pasadena’s treasured architecture and character by helping to designate the Madison Heights Landmark District, which would prevent the destruction of its historically significant homes. Landmark Districts apply to the exterior structure of properties visible to the street and ensure that historic features are maintained while changes are consistent with the house and the area. Pasadena has over 25 iconic neighborhoods that dot every corner of the city, ranging from the grand Bungalow Heaven to the tiny Marengo-Pico of just six properties.

SB9 comes into effect on January 1. It will allow for the destruction of historic architecture in order to build up to four new units where a house once stood, while also dividing the lots in half (if each subsequent lot can be 1,200 square feet or more – which s’ would apply to almost all properties in Madison Heights). It will also reduce the setbacks, allowing these new units to be just four feet from the side and rear property lines of neighbors. SB9 has no provision for affordable housing, and given the sale prices we’ve seen for lots smaller than most potential lots would be, it seems clear that affordability is not part of the story. the equation. Additionally, we are already enabling ADUs and Junior ADUs to increase the number of housing units in single-family neighborhoods (with incentives for affordable units), and Pasadena continues to be a leader in expanding needed housing, even if we are to do better with affordable housing.

Instead, SB9 is a godsend for the developers, who have already targeted Madison Heights owners, asking them to buy their homes and even offering them one of four new units they want to build. SB9 requires anyone who shares a lot to sign an affidavit stating that they intend to reside in one of their new units for at least three years, but this provision does not include any penalty for breaking up and is essentially meaningless.

The good news: Those who drafted SB9 recognized the value of preserving architecture and important historic neighborhoods, so they included an exemption for designated iconic neighborhoods (and other historic landmarks).

Establishing a Landmark District is the only way to protect what makes this district so special. There is a reason people come from all over the world to visit our streets. History, aesthetics and artistic architecture are of great value to people and cities. Since a massive concrete structure replaced a historic bungalow on Los Robles Avenue in Madison Heights, residents fear we are not protected.

In the minds of those who worked so hard before us, we must all help now. A majority of homeowners in a proposed Landmark neighborhood must sign a petition approving the designation. If you live in Madison Heights, you can check to see if you’re included on the map here: mhnapasadena.org/landmarkmap, and use this site to ask for the petition. Individual petition pages will be given to those who have not yet signed up.

Madison Heights is full of architectural gems from Greene & Greene, Arthur & Alfred Heineman, Wallace Neff, Frederick L. Roehrig, David M. Renton, Sylvanus Marston (including design work by Frank Lloyd Wright), John William Chard, Reginald Davis Johnson, et al., And many important works by lesser-known architects.

Once gone, that history and character will be erased forever.

“There is nothing like it elsewhere in California,” William Bogaard, former mayor of Pasadena and current chair of the Pasadena Housing Task Force, once said, generally speaking of the “unique charm of Pasadena” and its historic architecture.

We express our thanks to those who have helped preserve this incredible limited resource, and to those who are helping protect it now.

[ad_2]

]]>
Decatur DDA to partner with Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership on cottage yard project – Decaturish https://sadc-tribunal.org/decatur-dda-to-partner-with-atlanta-neighborhood-development-partnership-on-cottage-yard-project-decaturish/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 15:24:12 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/decatur-dda-to-partner-with-atlanta-neighborhood-development-partnership-on-cottage-yard-project-decaturish/ [ad_1] By Cathi Harris, collaborator Decatur, Georgia – The Decatur Downtown Development Authority (DDA) board of directors voted on Friday to work with the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership (ANDP) nonprofit to build their long-awaited cottage yard project at 230 Commerce Drive. First announced in 2016, the development was intended to be a demonstration of the […]]]>


[ad_1]

By Cathi Harris, collaborator

Decatur, Georgia – The Decatur Downtown Development Authority (DDA) board of directors voted on Friday to work with the Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership (ANDP) nonprofit to build their long-awaited cottage yard project at 230 Commerce Drive.

First announced in 2016, the development was intended to be a demonstration of the market viability for smaller footprint homes as good as a source of affordable housing for city employees.

But progress has stalled due to rapidly rising construction costs and issues with Georgia’s Ministry of Transportation. approval of a development entry, among other factors.

“At the end of the day, the development authority does not have the resources to play the role of developer for this project,” Decatur’s director of planning and economic development, Angela Threadgill, told the board. administration of the DDA. “It’s a lot for us. So having a partner in this field who has the vast experience of ANDP will be essential to get this started. “

A cartographic overview of the planned development of the Decatur chalet lot at 230 Commerce Drive. Image obtained via the city of Decatur.

The Atlanta Neighborhood Development Partnership, Inc. was founded in 1991 to “fund, develop and advocate for large-scale affordable housing that promotes racial equity and healthy communities where families thrive,” according to information on their website.

They have a particular focus on working in communities of color, particularly those in the southern Atlanta metro area, which have long suffered from divestment. And, they prioritize working with local, small, and minority-owned businesses, Jay Perlmutter, director of single-family home development at ANDP, told the board.

Their work includes buying and rehabilitating existing homes, providing loan and down payment assistance, and developing new affordable housing where it’s needed, he said. “We believe this will be of great benefit to the Town of Decatur and will help us meet our five-year goal of completing 250 rental properties, 500 owned units and 1,250 multi-family affordable housing units. “

According to the plans outlined in their agreement with the DDA, the ANDP would build six cottage-type courthouses: 1 one-bedroom house, 1 two-bedroom house and 4 three-bedroom houses, with an area ranging from 528 to 1117 square feet. . The estimated selling prices would be between $ 199,000 and $ 275,000.

“This is well below the metropolitan area median,” Perlmutter noted.

To preserve affordability in the future, the underlying land occupied by the chalets and common areas would be transferred to the Decatur Land Trust when each of the chalets is initially sold. The ANDP would also take care of the marketing of the finished houses and then examine the original buyers of the cottages under the terms set by the land trust. These conditions would include income limits and would reserve the first consideration for the city of Decatur, as well as employees of the municipal schools of Decatur and those of the Decatur Housing Authority.

During construction, the ANDP will acquire the land from the DDA so that, as the owner, it can more easily supervise the development: acquisition of permits and hiring of contractors, etc. The purchase of the land will be through a loan from DDA of $ 180,000 – the same amount DDA originally paid for the land. Holding the loan for the land protects the authority’s investment and allows it to ensure that the ANDP is doing what it is committed to doing.

As the houses are built and sold, this portion of the loan will be forgiven.

In addition to the land, DDA is also providing up to $ 200,000 to subsidize site preparation costs.

Unlike other real estate development projects, ANDP will not have recourse to external financing. They believe they have enough capital to build these six houses on their own, Perlmutter said. One gap in their budget is funding to prepare the site for construction and this is additional funding that the DDA has agreed to provide.

ANDP plans to work with James Cheeks at Fortas Homes to build the cottages. Fortas specializes in high quality small homes and has worked with ANDP on several other projects, Perlmutter said.

Once the agreement between DDA and ANDP is finalized, Perlmutter plans to obtain the first permit to disturb the soil before the end of the year or early January at the latest. The construction of the houses is expected to take between 12 and 15 months.

If you appreciate our work, please become a paying supporter. For as little as $ 3 a month, you can help us keep you up to date with your community. To become a supporter, click here.

Want Decaturish delivered to your inbox every day? Subscribe to our free newsletter by clicking here.

[ad_2]

]]>
Developer creates large residential neighborhood on north side golf course https://sadc-tribunal.org/developer-creates-large-residential-neighborhood-on-north-side-golf-course/ https://sadc-tribunal.org/developer-creates-large-residential-neighborhood-on-north-side-golf-course/#respond Tue, 19 Oct 2021 15:01:00 +0000 https://sadc-tribunal.org/developer-creates-large-residential-neighborhood-on-north-side-golf-course/ [ad_1] A preliminary conceptual plan for the Buckingham Cos project. (Image courtesy of the City of Indianapolis) An Indianapolis-based company plans to redevelop a par-3 golf resort on the north side into a sprawling residential neighborhood, with single-family homes, townhouses and hundreds of apartments. Buckingham Cos. hopes to build nearly 450 residences on a 25.5 […]]]>


[ad_1]

A preliminary conceptual plan for the Buckingham Cos project. (Image courtesy of the City of Indianapolis)

An Indianapolis-based company plans to redevelop a par-3 golf resort on the north side into a sprawling residential neighborhood, with single-family homes, townhouses and hundreds of apartments.

Buckingham Cos. hopes to build nearly 450 residences on a 25.5 acre property at 1775 E. 96th St., which is currently used by Shortee’s Golf Course. The development would be located just south of Interstate 465 and immediately west of Westfield Boulevard.

The project, whose development plans have been filed with the city’s Metropolitan Development Department, would include 65 single-family homes, approximately 58 townhouses and up to 324 apartments, as well as a multimodal trail and a public park.

The proposed project was set for a zoning hearing Wednesday with the Metropolitan Development Commission. It was postponed to November 17.

Once a farmland, the site has been home to Shortee’s since 2000.

Buckingham has indicated in public documents that he has Shortee’s property under contract for the development, pending city approvals. The Metropolitan Development Commission must approve an application to rezone the property in PD, planned development, from its current SU3 designation for special use in a residential area.

Single-family homes would run the length of the western part of the property, with the townhouses winding north and south to the middle of the property. The apartments would occupy most of the eastern half of the property.

The townhouses would be built in 13 three- or four-story buildings, each unit containing a minimum living area of ​​1,800 square feet, according to the documents. Each house would include a two-car rear-load garage, and its facades would consist largely of fiber cement panels, fiber cement siding, cast stone, or brick paneling, with vinyl siding largely absent from parts of the buildings. facing the audience. .

The apartments would be spread over nine buildings, of three or four floors. The apartments are said to have a dedicated clubhouse with a fitness center, outdoor pool, and lounge area, as well as a coffee station.

Single-family homes would vary between one and two stories. They would have attached or detached two-car garages and would be built with materials similar to townhouses.

As part of the project, Buckingham plans to cede approximately 2.75 acres along the western edge of the property to Indy Parks to create a public park and green space. The city has the option of refusing the donation, in which case the park would be integrated into the district as a common space that would be maintained by the three associations of owners of the district.

The development would include three retention basins. The project schedule has not yet been made public.

A representative for Buckingham did not respond to calls from IBJ for comment.

A similar project proposed by local developer Herman & Kittle Properties Inc. in 2015 was unsuccessful. Dubbed Links at 96th, the $ 45 million apartment community was expected to contain nearly 400 units. Homeowners nearby opposed the plan because of traffic issues and what they saw as an excessively dense units-to-acre ratio.

[ad_2]

]]>
https://sadc-tribunal.org/developer-creates-large-residential-neighborhood-on-north-side-golf-course/feed/ 0